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Old 03-04-2013, 07:50 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
In Shanghai, many residential buildings are in European styles, so it may be similar to NYC in this regard.
I'd be interested in seeing the old historic part of town. I'd like to see the Russian part of Harbin, too. Is the air in Shanghai breathable?
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Old 03-04-2013, 09:47 PM
 
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New York and Toyko are similar in the sense that they are huge capital cities of wealthy countries. They are both crowded, major world hubs of business/culture, extremely urbane, filled with creative energy and world class amenities that arguably only London can match. Of course there are differences but the biggest diference is that NYC is a cosmopolitan city. Yes, Tokyo has people from around the world living there but it is a tiny fraction compared to NYC. This gives NYC a flavor and more ecletic patchwork of different personalities/people/neighborhoods that Tokyo can't compete with. But Tokyo is definitely bigger. I believe I read the metro area was 35million or something...the biggest city in the world. Just looking at the subway map, one can infer that it is bigger city than NYC. I spent a few days there and barely dented the subway map - the city was that big with crowds everywhere with lots of intersting things to explore just like NYC, although it was much more expensive to do anything in Tokyo. In fact, a lot of travellers don't spend too much time in Tokyo because it is so astronomically expensive.

The modern architecture in some parts of downtown like Ginza (downtown shopping district) did remind me a little bit of midtown Manhattan. Tokyo is very modern, as NYC still has a large stock of old housing and historical buildings mixed in with modern gems. But the modern is a little different there...it is Japan after all so they have their own style. I think if one loves big urbane cities, one will love both of these cities...as they set the standard.

Last edited by johnathanc; 03-04-2013 at 09:57 PM..
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Old 03-04-2013, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Soho is in Manhattan.
my thought sstill stands
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Old 03-05-2013, 01:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PA Born View Post
I actually found Tokyo to be less busy/crowded than NYC, and more spread out.

Tokyo is a multinodal city, and is kind of a mix between in LA and NYC. Like LA, it has a variety of activity centers, and not one main "core". But like NYC, most of the main activity centers are in a general area (in Tokyo, the Yamamote Loop) and it's very transit-oriented (probably even moreso than NYC).

The areas right next to train stations in Tokyo are extremely dense and busy, though they aren't super high density like in Manhattan. But you can go two blocks away and be in these narrow streets with single family homes and the like. It's kinda weird, and hard to describe if you're used to North American or European urban contexts.

But Tokyo is HUGE, make no mistake. I don't think it ever feels as intense as the very busiest areas of Manhattan, though.

Regarding "relative newness", Tokyo feels newer than NYC, but doesn't really feel "new". The biggest growth decades in Tokyo were the 60's and 70's, so you see tons of buildings from that area. It doesn't feel "new" like parts of Seoul or Shanghai or wherever.

The subway is newer than NYC, but not "new". It feels like 50's/60's feel, and is kind of simple and unadorned. It looks maybe like the postwar subway systems in Germany or wherever, or maybe like Toronto or Mexico City (maybe a bit newer and nicer than Toronto, which has kind of a dilapidated system). But Tokyo Metro does not feel all super-modern and shiny like in Hong Kong or Seoul.
I think overall Tokyo is more like LA than NYC, since LA has a more modern look and feel, and as you mentioned the sprawl with multiple skylines. Both are in a large basin surrounded by mountains, and in an earthquake zone. LA also has a large Japanese influence.

NYC on the other hand is more like London than Tokyo. There was another thread in which the neighborhoods of London were compared to the ones of NYC. The Canary Wharf area looks like Lower Manhatten with skyscrapers on a peninsula.
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Old 03-05-2013, 10:50 AM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnathanc View Post
New York and Toyko are similar in the sense that they are huge capital cities of wealthy countries.
They are the largest cities in their respective countries, yes, but NYC is not the capital of USA.
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyh View Post
They are the largest cities in their respective countries, yes, but NYC is not the capital of USA.
I agree and perhaps it was a bad choice of words on my part. I meant they are business and cultural capitals of their respective countries.
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Well, both are massively large and all the characteristics that come from that would be similar.

But, at the same time, they are totally different. New York City is the entire planet living in one city, with large neighborhoods of massive immigrant groups all over the place. You can get off the subway and end up in Poland or India or Puerto Rico or Korea, etc. It's all in NYC is large numbers. Many of the neighborhoods are really different from each other through the city as well.

Tokyo does have some non-Japanese, but nowhere on the scale of NYC by any means at all. Tokyo has a much more homogenous feel among both the neighborhoods and the people.
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Old 03-07-2013, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnathanc View Post
I agree and perhaps it was a bad choice of words on my part. I meant they are business and cultural capitals of their respective countries.
I thought you were referring to "capital" as in capital goods, resources, and wealth.
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Old 03-09-2013, 10:57 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
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Judging from what I've experienced going through NYC and Tokyo ...

Manhattan is like a few of the nodes of Tokyo jammed together. Tokyo doesn't want to build too many tall buildings because of earthquakes. So they spread out. I'd say Manhattan is kinda like Ginza, with some Shinjuku thrown in there. Za' Gin has all the high-class shops and stuff that you'd expect and Shinjuku has the busy people running around.

Though to be sure, both cities are totally unique and different from one another. It's true about the subway and JR of Tokyo vs. the subway of NYC. NYC subways have been around for the better part of a century. Tokyo's since the 50s. Tokyo station is what I expect most of Tokyo's stations to look like if the war hadn't happened.

And to be sure, you're a HECK of a lot safer in Tokyo, and you're not guaranteed to get Hep-C from the toilets in Tokyo station (or any station in Tokyo really). OK I'm exaggerating. But you won't see as many crazies and people wanting money because ... well I think it's outlawed in Tokyo. It just doesn't happen.

Yeah, comparing the two is pretty difficult. You have to go there to experience it.
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Old 03-09-2013, 11:34 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I'd be interested in seeing the old historic part of town. I'd like to see the Russian part of Harbin, too. Is the air in Shanghai breathable?
Much more so than most other major cities in China and a huge step up from Beijing. Not the best, but far from the worse.

One of the better urban preservation bits of Shanghai (which generally isn't so good at valuing its architectural history) is that the shiny new skyscrapers were built across the river from the older parts of town in a greenfield area rather than just demolishing the older buildings (though some of that has been done as well).
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