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Old 03-06-2013, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom9 View Post
But the English would have certainly pushed the Anglican church rather than the Catholic church wouldn't they? IN the case of India and the Empire in general.
I think The Portuguese were around there also, I think thats where the name Colombo came from.
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Tom9 View Post
But the English would have certainly pushed the Anglican church rather than the Catholic church wouldn't they? IN the case of India and the Empire in general.


No the English were strictly concerned about money and keeping the peace as long as they held onto power. They made it a point not to get involved in religious issues. The British even made it a point to restrict the Portguese and their zeal for religious conversion (Goan Inquistion).
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:02 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
I think The Portuguese were around there also, I think thats where the name Colombo came from.
Yes Ceylon (Sri Lanka) was a Portuguese and then a Dutch possession, but their hold on it was rather tenuous. Catholicism is still far commonly practised than Protestantism among Indian Christians, despite centuries of British rule.
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
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I would also add Burma as a country of devout Buddhist. You are practically a minority if you practice another religion and will have problems finding work and could be persecuted for being Muslim, Christian, etc...

The festivals, ceremony's and pilgrimages are very interesting.
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:05 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by Momotaro View Post
I would also add Burma as a country of devout Buddhist. You are practically a minority if you practice another religion and will have problems finding work and could be persecuted for being Muslim, Christian, etc...

The festivals, ceremony's and pilgrimages are very interesting.
Burma is stuck in the past, which is both good and bad.

Thailand is like 96% Buddhist but I wonder how religious most Thais are.
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Old 03-06-2013, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Columbus, Ohio
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Burma is stuck in the past, which is both good and bad.

Thailand is like 96% Buddhist but I wonder how religious most Thais are.

I would say a good portion of the 96% (just a guess) are not very religious. Thailand is a very free society for the most part, which tends to lead to folks being less devout that their ancestors.
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:02 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momotaro View Post
I would say a good portion of the 96% (just a guess) are not very religious. Thailand is a very free society for the most part, which tends to lead to folks being less devout that their ancestors.
Yes. I mean having sex with a lot of strange foreign men is probably not something that the Buddha would have approved of.
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Old 03-06-2013, 10:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Momotaro View Post
I would also add Burma as a country of devout Buddhist. You are practically a minority if you practice another religion and will have problems finding work and could be persecuted for being Muslim, Christian, etc...

The festivals, ceremony's and pilgrimages are very interesting.
Several years back I saw a documentary on Burmese Jews. I suppose at this point one would have to really dog around for it. It was on PBS. It was truly a surprise if true and I have no doubt that it was.

Added on Edit. If you have not seen the film by Ichikawa Kon "The Harp of Burma" (Black and white version from the 1950's then there is a treat in store for you.
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Old 03-07-2013, 12:33 AM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mistertee View Post
No the English were strictly concerned about money and keeping the peace as long as they held onto power. They made it a point not to get involved in religious issues. The British even made it a point to restrict the Portguese and their zeal for religious conversion (Goan Inquistion).
The Dutch were also active in missionary activities (with their purist Calvinist/Reformed Church tradition) and were militantly anti-Catholic of the Portuguese and their converts. That said, an overwhelming majority of the Sri Lankan Christians remain Catholics to this day. While the English were not tolerant of Catholic practices in their home turf, they were surprisingly quite accommodating to the Catholics in their overseas colonies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Momotaro View Post
I would say a good portion of the 96% (just a guess) are not very religious. Thailand is a very free society for the most part, which tends to lead to folks being less devout that their ancestors.
They may not be religious in the sense that they follow the teachings of the Buddha, but they certainly are spiritual (with a mix of superstitions, like visiting witch doctors/shamans) that folk beliefs pervade the religious traditions of the Thais.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom9 View Post
Several years back I saw a documentary on Burmese Jews. I suppose at this point one would have to really dog around for it. It was on PBS. It was truly a surprise if true and I have no doubt that it was.

Added on Edit. If you have not seen the film by Ichikawa Kon "The Harp of Burma" (Black and white version from the 1950's then there is a treat in store for you.
I visited the one and only synagogue (still operating and manned by a few remnant Jewish caretakers) in Yangon, and it receives many foreign and Jewish visitors every now and then. Interestingly, it is located in a predominantly Indian Muslim neighbourhood. Talk about coexistence!
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Old 03-07-2013, 02:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyh View Post
The Dutch were also active in missionary activities (with their purist Calvinist/Reformed Church tradition) and were militantly anti-Catholic of the Portuguese and their converts. That said, an overwhelming majority of the Sri Lankan Christians remain Catholics to this day. While the English were not tolerant of Catholic practices in their home turf, they were surprisingly quite accommodating to the Catholics in their overseas colonies.


They may not be religious in the sense that they follow the teachings of the Buddha, but they certainly are spiritual (with a mix of superstitions, like visiting witch doctors/shamans) that folk beliefs pervade the religious traditions of the Thais.


I visited the one and only synagogue (still operating and manned by a few remnant Jewish caretakers) in Yangon, and it receives many foreign and Jewish visitors every now and then. Interestingly, it is located in a predominantly Indian Muslim neighbourhood. Talk about coexistence!



Correct about the Dutch. But they were defeated in battle in Kerala, India, thus ending what colonial and conversion efforts there. As for Jews, the same co existence can be found in Kerala, India. I am a Jew from India. Kerala has been the only place in the world that has allowed us to flourish and live peacefully for centuries.
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