U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-22-2013, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Washington State
18,580 posts, read 9,605,999 times
Reputation: 15827

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
projecting forward, it would seem Mandarin would be more important to know than English for the younger population.
Yeah I've wanted my kids to learn Mandarin but right now at least, almost all worldwide business is conducted in English and to change that will require circumstances that I can't imagine at this point. In the Middle East business is conducted in English, in Europe also, Africa yes, North America obviously, Hong Kong, Singapore, Autralia, Philippines, Malaysia...English. Chinese is difficult to learn especially to learn to write and I can't forsee how Mandarin becomes the worldwide language.

China has yet to eclipse the USA in GNP although they will at some point due to 4X the population of the USA but they'll not eclipse the GNP of the English speaking world in the next 50 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-22-2013, 06:39 PM
 
Location: The North
5,083 posts, read 9,101,145 times
Reputation: 4061
Probably outside the big cities it is true. There is no reinforcement of English learned in the villages and more rural parts of the country so even if English is mandatory in schools as a second language it will be learned as well as most people learn Spanish in the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-22-2013, 10:23 PM
 
1,447 posts, read 1,846,649 times
Reputation: 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
People keep saying this, but I personally know and have hung out in Hispanic majority neighborhoods in new York City, this argument does not hold water at all. The stereotype among Hispanic-Americans in the US is that, "I can't speak Spanish but abuelito/a does".
have you been to the south? i dont think new york city would be as much as a representative of future hispanic population trends as much as the southern states/cities do. here in texas, when you see a hispanic looking person, more often than not they can speak spanish, or latin american spanish even when they were born and raised in the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2013, 07:39 AM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,188,447 times
Reputation: 11619
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilam98 View Post
have you been to the south? i dont think new york city would be as much as a representative of future hispanic population trends as much as the southern states/cities do. here in texas, when you see a hispanic looking person, more often than not they can speak spanish, or latin american spanish even when they were born and raised in the US.
Let me ask you a question then. Are they first generation? How old are they? And, how do you know? Keep in mind that the majority of illegal immigrants are people under 40 these days. So, what does that mean? The Spanish you are hearing is 99% very likely spoken by a foreigner not a US citizen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2013, 09:34 AM
bg7
 
7,697 posts, read 8,177,667 times
Reputation: 15093
According to the Pew research center, by the third generation only 38% of hispanic immigrants "retain the ability to speak and understand Spanish". No surprise there. While the US will defintiely become more hispanic, and the number of people able to speak Spanish increases in absolute terms, Spanish is not going to supplant English in the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2013, 05:04 PM
 
1,447 posts, read 1,846,649 times
Reputation: 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Let me ask you a question then. Are they first generation? How old are they? And, how do you know? Keep in mind that the majority of illegal immigrants are people under 40 these days. So, what does that mean? The Spanish you are hearing is 99% very likely spoken by a foreigner not a US citizen.

well, ask yourself the same questions and let's compare. are the hispanic neighborhoods in NY first generation? how old are they? how do you know? are they legal or illegal immigrants?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2013, 05:49 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,188,447 times
Reputation: 11619
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilam98 View Post
well, ask yourself the same questions and let's compare. are the hispanic neighborhoods in NY first generation? how old are they? how do you know? are they legal or illegal immigrants?
No, most are 2nd or 3rd generation, some even 4th. The ones that speak Spanish are definitely the Baby Boomer generation. The wrinkles around their eyes, receding hairline, graying, etc. The ones under 30 are most likely citizens, ones over 30 probably legal. You know, if you tried to make some kind of point, I don't think it worked. Unlike you or the person I replied to, I've actually lived in these neighborhoods before and so have close relatives.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2013, 06:38 PM
 
1,447 posts, read 1,846,649 times
Reputation: 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
No, most are 2nd or 3rd generation, some even 4th. The ones that speak Spanish are definitely the Baby Boomer generation. The wrinkles around their eyes, receding hairline, graying, etc. The ones under 30 are most likely citizens, ones over 30 probably legal. You know, if you tried to make some kind of point, I don't think it worked. Unlike you or the person I replied to, I've actually lived in these neighborhoods before and so have close relatives.

even so, does the population of NY trump that of southern states to indicate future hispanic trends? granted, the ones in the south are probably more of the illegal types, not like the ever important NY neighborhoods who have legal residents or citizens, but they're living in the US to have some impact.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2013, 03:05 AM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
383 posts, read 1,062,954 times
Reputation: 143
Guys, let's stick back to Malaysia and not US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2013, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,259,807 times
Reputation: 2833
I was rather surprised on my last visit to visit my grandfather in Ipoh to meet some Chinese Malaysians who spoke very basic English or hardly at all! I didn't know such existed in Malaysia. I mean they're rare, and mostly old, but there was one lady who was in her 40s who I couldn't have a conversation with. I feel the more educated of the earlier generation have a better command of the language. Malaysia might have to start re-emphasising English to compete globally.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top