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Old 04-15-2013, 05:33 PM
 
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Singapore separated from Malaysia in the 1960s, so not that long ago. Malaysia decided on Singaporean independence. They separated based on distrust and ideological differences between the leaders in the state of Singapore and the federal government in Malaysia for politics, economic, financial, and social policies. Singapore in Malaysia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

They have a similar Chinese, Indian, and Malay blend going on. Some of the lifestyle and energy continues to have similarities.

Singapore is a lot more Buddhist, Christian, Secular/Non-Religious, but also continues to have a significant percentage of Muslims. Malaysia has a very high percentage of Muslims, but the secular version of Islam.

Singaporeans and Malaysians always travel between both countries.

Singapore really benefited from independence, and is an ultra wealthy city state country, and Malaysians appear to not mind that Singapore is a separate country now. They both managed this relatively peacefully and appear to have mostly good relations together in modern times.
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Old 04-16-2013, 02:58 AM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
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Yes, especially because right across the strait in Malaysia there is Johor Bahru, which would technically be in Singapore's "metropolitan area" the way New Jersey is with New York, despite being two different countries. Well, so more like Detroit and Windsor or San Diego and Tijuana with more interactivity. I suppose.

Culturally, yes Singapore still draws quite a lot of Malaysian culture.
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Old 04-16-2013, 09:29 AM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Singapore separated from Malaysia in the 1960s, so not that long ago. Malaysia decided on Singaporean independence. They separated based on distrust and ideological differences between the leaders in the state of Singapore and the federal government in Malaysia for politics, economic, financial, and social policies. Singapore in Malaysia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

They have a similar Chinese, Indian, and Malay blend going on. Some of the lifestyle and energy continues to have similarities.

Singapore is a lot more Buddhist, Christian, Secular/Non-Religious, but also continues to have a significant percentage of Muslims. Malaysia has a very high percentage of Muslims, but the secular version of Islam.

Singaporeans and Malaysians always travel between both countries.

Singapore really benefited from independence, and is an ultra wealthy city state country, and Malaysians appear to not mind that Singapore is a separate country now. They both managed this relatively peacefully and appear to have mostly good relations together in modern times.
Many Malay Malaysians DO mind about the loss of Singapore. They regard it as a Malay realm that should have been part of Malaysia (esp the Sultanate of Johor), but unfortunately with a twist of fate, has become dominated by Chinese, a fact that is especially loathed by the nationalists. Ultra-nationalists often use this as a rallying call to incite the Malays so as to stand up united against a possible usurpation of political power by the Chinese community in Malaysia, and warn them not to vote for any Chinese/Non-Malay/secular political parties.

Malaysia's Islam is largely moderate, but not secular. Secularism is generally frowned on by religious Muslim Malays.

Malaysia-Singapore relations were particularly rocky during Mahathir's term as PM of Malaysia and Lee Kuan Yew's term as PM of Singapore. Both were extremely charismatic leaders during their premiership in their own respective countries, and both were frequently at odds with each other when it comes to anything political. Things only turned for the better with the arrival of the new century and the retirement of these two political veterans.
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Old 04-16-2013, 09:30 AM
 
Location: southern california
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the poor malay provide the day labor for them much like mexico and the united states.
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Old 04-16-2013, 10:38 AM
 
Location: San Diego CA
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I was living in Singapore at the time of the break with Malaysia. Remember the Singapore prime minister Lee Kuan Yew on television making the announcement.
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Old 04-16-2013, 06:51 PM
 
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Generally, Singaporean and Malaysian having good relationship to one another. If Singapore is part of Malaysia now, the Chinese ethnic will make up the majority instead of Muslim. So that is why It has to be divined into two countries.
I am Singaporean-Chinese
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Old 04-16-2013, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Great_Jack View Post
Generally, Singaporean and Malaysian having good relationship to one another. If Singapore is part of Malaysia now, the Chinese ethnic will make up the majority instead of Muslim. So that is why It has to be divined into two countries.
I am Singaporean-Chinese
On that note, I was really surprised how many Chinese live in Malaysia. Especially in Ipoh, Malacca, Penang, etc.
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Old 04-17-2013, 08:31 AM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Great_Jack View Post
Generally, Singaporean and Malaysian having good relationship to one another. If Singapore is part of Malaysia now, the Chinese ethnic will make up the majority instead of Muslim. So that is why It has to be divined into two countries.
I am Singaporean-Chinese
The Chinese population in Singapore is around 2.8 million, while there are around 7 million of them in Malaysia, adding up to a total of 9.8 million, which is still lagging behind the 14.8 million Malay Muslims in Malaysia alone.

Aside from politics, relations between common Malaysians and Singaporeans are generally amicable, since many still have families and relatives on both sides of the causeway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
On that note, I was really surprised how many Chinese live in Malaysia. Especially in Ipoh, Malacca, Penang, etc.
Ipoh is about 70% Chinese. Chinese Penangites mainly live on Penang island, while the Malays tend to concentrate on mainland Penang (Seberang Perai/Province Wellesley). Malacca state is 1/3 Chinese. The national capital, Kuala Lumpur has about the same numbers of Malays and Chinese.
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Old 04-17-2013, 09:14 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,116 posts, read 23,634,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyh View Post
The Chinese population in Singapore is around 2.8 million, while there are around 7 million of them in Malaysia, adding up to a total of 9.8 million, which is still lagging behind the 14.8 million Malay Muslims in Malaysia alone.

Aside from politics, relations between common Malaysians and Singaporeans are generally amicable, since many still have families and relatives on both sides of the causeway.



Ipoh is about 70% Chinese. Chinese Penangites mainly live on Penang island, while the Malays tend to concentrate on mainland Penang (Seberang Perai/Province Wellesley). Malacca state is 1/3 Chinese. The national capital, Kuala Lumpur has about the same numbers of Malays and Chinese.
I think at the time of decolonization, the demographics were either really close or a a slight Chinese majority. Over the decades, the Malay population grew a lot faster than the Chinese population did and government policy in Malaysia made it disadvantageous for some Chinese Malaysians to stay in the country rather than emigrate.
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Old 04-17-2013, 02:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
I think at the time of decolonization, the demographics were either really close or a a slight Chinese majority. Over the decades, the Malay population grew a lot faster than the Chinese population did and government policy in Malaysia made it disadvantageous for some Chinese Malaysians to stay in the country rather than emigrate.
Yes, at the time of decolonization. On the time Chinese was majority of Malaysia. For now Malay ethnic is majority because Malays population are growing up faster than Chinese popolation.
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