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Old 05-28-2013, 06:51 AM
 
Location: American Expat
2,189 posts, read 4,716,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
So the architecture, introduction of quoc ngu, baguettes and French pastries, french fries, cafe culture have nothing to do with the French? I'm not saying the influence is/was pervasive, but it's definitely noticeable.
You call banh mi a baguette!? It's not a baguette and it dosen't look like one. Banh mi is huge, airy (very much so) and oval. A baguette is long and it's real bread. And I don't want do disappoint you, but french fries are just called french fries, but it's from Belgium. Even if they were from France.. french fries.. really?? The thing is that everything people have mentioned here applies to any other country. I can get "baguettes" everywhere, I can get french fries everywhere ( Although that one dosen't count ).
I didn't see any "French looking buildings" in Ha Noi, but even if there are 1 or 2, I don't see how this makes any difference. The French just love to think the entire world revolves around them.
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Old 05-28-2013, 07:37 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
You call banh mi a baguette!? It's not a baguette and it dosen't look like one. Banh mi is huge, airy (very much so) and oval. A baguette is long and it's real bread. And I don't want do disappoint you, but french fries are just called french fries, but it's from Belgium. Even if they were from France.. french fries.. really?? The thing is that everything people have mentioned here applies to any other country. I can get "baguettes" everywhere, I can get french fries everywhere ( Although that one dosen't count ).
I didn't see any "French looking buildings" in Ha Noi, but even if there are 1 or 2, I don't see how this makes any difference. The French just love to think the entire world revolves around them.
So Vietnamese rolls aren't real bread? How so?

There are plenty of French colonial buildings in the French Quarter, Old Quarter.etc in Hanoi. At least more than a dozen or so.
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Old 05-29-2013, 11:44 AM
 
6,066 posts, read 10,848,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I haven't been to France or had a lot of French food so I can't say how authentic it is, but since many were owned and run by French people I assume they were. Of course not all of the ingredients would be readily available in Vietnam. I dined at the restaurant at the Metropole Hotel in Hanoi, the most famous hotel in Hanoi (many famous celebs stayed there) which had excellent food. The waiter was friendly and had an interest in wines, I think he did or was thinking of doing a wine-making course in France. I think quite a few Vietnamese dream of one day at least visiting Paris, so there is some connection to France as a cultural parent in some people, but probably not to the degree of say how Singaporeans view the UK.

Hoi An was my favourite place in Vietnam, because it had an old villagey feel - a lot of the streets didn't allow traffic only pedestrians, it had a lot of beautiful old buildings, and the food was all round delicious. It's getting a bit touristy though. Some of the pastries were nice. Vietnamese coffee is a bit strong and sweet though.

I didn't ask him too much about life in France. I think the idea of Asian Europeans, aside from British ones, is still a novelty for many people. Most people in the world are used to American, Canadian, Australian or British Asian people but less so German or French. I think Vietnamese are more likely to retain some of their culture, such as speaking the language, vs some other groups, but I'm not sure how much they've integrated.

If you have any more questions about Vietnam don't hesitate to ask me.
The French-Southeast Asian Vietnam relations is very interesting, even if mostly subtle, it is noticeable, and continuing to exist. Most people in the world probably don’t know the historical and modern connections between France-Vietnam.


However, of course Vietnam is unique, having a prominent Vietnamese national identity, and being mostly very different from France.

Traveling in Vietnam appears to be a very exciting adventure, exotic, and culturally vibrant with plenty of positive tourist attractions to offer for visitors. I would visit Saigon, Hoi An, Ha Long, Nha Trang, Hanoi, and Sapa highlands.

What are other worthwhile places for visiting in Vietnam to go with those places? Is living in Vietnam another story compared to visiting? Living there also seems to be intriguing, even if not the same as visiting.


Well, this novelty for the idea of Asian Europeans is going to change soon when more people know the reality.

All of the Asian Europeans I met up to now, including Vietnamese in France, Germany, UK, British Indians, French Indians, and even a Swedish Indian all said they have good, positive experiences for living in those countries of Europe, and becoming relatively easy to integrate, and assimilate into culture over there too. Asian immigration is becoming more popular in some European countries, and is successful for this part of multicultural activity for East/South/Southeast Asians.

These are some examples for people having a good, prominent life in Europe: A French Korean economic minister in present French government: Fleur Pellerin - Wikipédia

A French Vietnamese actress and senior marketing manager: Linh Dan Pham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Vietnamese German politician becoming the federal minister of Economics and Technology in Germany: Philipp Rösler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The current South Korean president even briefly studied in University of Grenoble in France in the 1970s!: Park Geun-hye - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


There is actually much more French Vietnamese than British Vietnamese: 250,000 to 300,000 people in France compared to 55,000 to 90,000 people in UK/England.
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Old 05-29-2013, 12:29 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
The French-Southeast Asian Vietnam relations is very interesting, even if mostly subtle, it is noticeable, and continuing to exist. Most people in the world probably don’t know the historical and modern connections between France-Vietnam.


However, of course Vietnam is unique, having a prominent Vietnamese national identity, and being mostly very different from France.

Traveling in Vietnam appears to be a very exciting adventure, exotic, and culturally vibrant with plenty of positive tourist attractions to offer for visitors. I would visit Saigon, Hoi An, Ha Long, Nha Trang, Hanoi, and Sapa highlands.

What are other worthwhile places for visiting in Vietnam to go with those places? Is living in Vietnam another story compared to visiting? Living there also seems to be intriguing, even if not the same as visiting.


Well, this novelty for the idea of Asian Europeans is going to change soon when more people know the reality.

All of the Asian Europeans I met up to now, including Vietnamese in France, Germany, UK, British Indians, French Indians, and even a Swedish Indian all said they have good, positive experiences for living in those countries of Europe, and becoming relatively easy to integrate, and assimilate into culture over there too. Asian immigration is becoming more popular in some European countries, and is successful for this part of multicultural activity for East/South/Southeast Asians.

These are some examples for people having a good, prominent life in Europe: A French Korean economic minister in present French government: Fleur Pellerin - Wikipédia

A French Vietnamese actress and senior marketing manager: Linh Dan Pham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Vietnamese German politician becoming the federal minister of Economics and Technology in Germany: Philipp Rösler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The current South Korean president even briefly studied in University of Grenoble in France in the 1970s!: Park Geun-hye - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


There is actually much more French Vietnamese than British Vietnamese: 250,000 to 300,000 people in France compared to 55,000 to 90,000 people in UK/England.
Those destinations are exactly the ones I did and that took 3 weeks. I think that's a good timeframe to be able to do it. I travelled by bus, train, plane and boat. For a first time visit, it's a great itinerary for getting a taste of a bit of everything.

If you plan to stay a bit longer, other places to visit include the national parks: Cat Tien, Phuc Cuoc (yes the names do sound rude haha), Bach Ma, Vu Quong, Yok Don in the Central Highlands. The central highlands townships/villages of Kontum and Pleku, Ba Be Lake scenic area, Mai Chau valley scenic area with more ethnic minorities. Phong Nha Cave near Dong Hoi, Khe Sanh and the DMZ. Tay Ninh province and Tay Ninh to see the Cao Dai religion. Purple Pagoda. My Son near Hoi An. Vung Tau and China Beach, Danang, with well known R&R spots during the War, but you can probably find better in Thailand. The Mekong Delta is great for a taste of village life as well, and sample some local produce.
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Old 06-02-2013, 11:13 AM
 
6,066 posts, read 10,848,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Those destinations are exactly the ones I did and that took 3 weeks. I think that's a good timeframe to be able to do it. I travelled by bus, train, plane and boat. For a first time visit, it's a great itinerary for getting a taste of a bit of everything.

If you plan to stay a bit longer, other places to visit include the national parks: Cat Tien, Phuc Cuoc (yes the names do sound rude haha), Bach Ma, Vu Quong, Yok Don in the Central Highlands. The central highlands townships/villages of Kontum and Pleku, Ba Be Lake scenic area, Mai Chau valley scenic area with more ethnic minorities. Phong Nha Cave near Dong Hoi, Khe Sanh and the DMZ. Tay Ninh province and Tay Ninh to see the Cao Dai religion. Purple Pagoda. My Son near Hoi An. Vung Tau and China Beach, Danang, with well known R&R spots during the War, but you can probably find better in Thailand. The Mekong Delta is great for a taste of village life as well, and sample some local produce.
Thank you for the specific traveling recommendations for Vietnam and the best places to visit.

The more I get to know about Vietnam, the more impressive, intriguing, and culturally vibrant Vietnam appears to me. I used to not consider Vietnam as a place to visit. I have a dramatic change of opinions for Vietnam and now I certainly view Vietnam as a worthwhile place to visit and experience, but for a lot more reasons other than related to this topic.

You are fortunate for traveling all over Asia, including for Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Sri Lanka recently.

Yes, Saigon, Hoi An, Ha Long, Nha Trang, Hanoi, and Sapa highlands appear to be the best destinations in Vietnam and a good timeframe for visiting within 3 weeks. This is also true for Cat Tien, Phuc Cuoc, Bach Ma, Vu Quong, Yok Don in the Central Highlands, Kontum, Pleku, Ba Be Lake scenic area, Mai Chau valley scenic area, Phong Nha Cave near Dong Hoi, Khe Sanh, Tay Ninh province.

What are your opinions for the other part of the earlier post for the Vietnamese community in France, Germany, and UK, and how well Asians are assimilating and integrating into certain European countries, including for the prominent European Asians I said earlier?
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Old 06-02-2013, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,166 posts, read 1,255,988 times
Reputation: 442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
You call banh mi a baguette!? It's not a baguette and it dosen't look like one. Banh mi is huge, airy (very much so) and oval. A baguette is long and it's real bread. And I don't want do disappoint you, but french fries are just called french fries, but it's from Belgium. Even if they were from France.. french fries.. really?? The thing is that everything people have mentioned here applies to any other country. I can get "baguettes" everywhere, I can get french fries everywhere ( Although that one dosen't count ).
I didn't see any "French looking buildings" in Ha Noi, but even if there are 1 or 2, I don't see how this makes any difference. The French just love to think the entire world revolves around them.
The banh mi IS THE DIRECT product of the French influence in the area. It is a fusion food of French baguette and the local flavors. A baguette is long? Have you ever heard of a DEMI baguette?

http://www.la-boulangerie.ie/images/...i-baguette.jpg

Looks like a banh mi, doesn't it? That's because it basically is. The only difference is that AS A FUSION FOOD the Vietnamese make their bread with rice flour. That doesn't make it "faux bread", and that is the reason for it having a slightly different texture and having the airy quality.
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Old 06-02-2013, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,359,093 times
Reputation: 11309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
You call banh mi a baguette!? It's not a baguette and it dosen't look like one. Banh mi is huge, airy (very much so) and oval. A baguette is long and it's real bread. And I don't want do disappoint you, but french fries are just called french fries, but it's from Belgium. Even if they were from France.. french fries.. really?? The thing is that everything people have mentioned here applies to any other country. I can get "baguettes" everywhere, I can get french fries everywhere ( Although that one dosen't count ).
I didn't see any "French looking buildings" in Ha Noi, but even if there are 1 or 2, I don't see how this makes any difference. The French just love to think the entire world revolves around them.
I'm trying to figure out how bread made with rice flour isn't bread...
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:04 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cnote11 View Post
The banh mi IS THE DIRECT product of the French influence in the area. It is a fusion food of French baguette and the local flavors. A baguette is long? Have you ever heard of a DEMI baguette?

http://www.la-boulangerie.ie/images/...i-baguette.jpg

Looks like a banh mi, doesn't it? That's because it basically is. The only difference is that AS A FUSION FOOD the Vietnamese make their bread with rice flour. That doesn't make it "faux bread", and that is the reason for it having a slightly different texture and having the airy quality.
Really, rice flour? Interesting. I wouldn't have guessed. I didn't know you could make bread out of rice flour.
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:05 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Thank you for the specific traveling recommendations for Vietnam and the best places to visit.

The more I get to know about Vietnam, the more impressive, intriguing, and culturally vibrant Vietnam appears to me. I used to not consider Vietnam as a place to visit. I have a dramatic change of opinions for Vietnam and now I certainly view Vietnam as a worthwhile place to visit and experience, but for a lot more reasons other than related to this topic.

You are fortunate for traveling all over Asia, including for Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Sri Lanka recently.

Yes, Saigon, Hoi An, Ha Long, Nha Trang, Hanoi, and Sapa highlands appear to be the best destinations in Vietnam and a good timeframe for visiting within 3 weeks. This is also true for Cat Tien, Phuc Cuoc, Bach Ma, Vu Quong, Yok Don in the Central Highlands, Kontum, Pleku, Ba Be Lake scenic area, Mai Chau valley scenic area, Phong Nha Cave near Dong Hoi, Khe Sanh, Tay Ninh province.

What are your opinions for the other part of the earlier post for the Vietnamese community in France, Germany, and UK, and how well Asians are assimilating and integrating into certain European countries, including for the prominent European Asians I said earlier?
Well I like Vietnamese food so I think it's a good thing, lol. I dont know how well Europeans are assimilating in those countries but it doesn't seem there is too much prejudice.
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Old 06-03-2013, 09:06 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,149 posts, read 23,676,300 times
Reputation: 11625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Really, rice flour? Interesting. I wouldn't have guessed. I didn't know you could make bread out of rice flour.
It's not all rice flour--it's a mix of wheat and rice flour. Rice flour was used as an extender since wheat flour was expensive and not native to the area, but it just so happened to impart a nice crispness to it.
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