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Old 11-02-2007, 12:18 AM
 
Location: Utah
1,455 posts, read 3,583,178 times
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I've enjoyed reading this thread! I am interested in learning what life is like in former Soviet countries.
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Old 11-02-2007, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Bike to Surf!
3,080 posts, read 9,942,068 times
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Om Bee, thanks for your replies. Regarding racism and gaps in social status; I was merely suggesting that these are the two big factors that have historically destabilized countries in "our" hemisphere like Venezuala and Cuba. I'm glad to hear that racism is not a problem in Kz, and that people have a positive attitude about the income gap.

What do you think is the best solution to the nationality question? Should the Russians try to assimilate better and not discriminate against non-Russians? Should the Kazaks be more accepting and not worry about foreign backgrounds?

I guess the answer is obviously "yes" to both but how do you get people to change?

I would like to go skiing in Kz.

Is there any open-air prospecting? In mountains not far from where I live, you can go for a walk and find precious and semi-precious stones just lying around on the ground--if you are very, very lucky that is. And, even if you don't find anything, at least you had a nice walk. When you talked about mineral wealth, that sort of thing just came to my mind. Is there anything like that in Kz or is it all just "potassium" mines?
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Old 11-02-2007, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
295 posts, read 756,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Om Bee View Post
Hi, CroatWebWanderer! (May I ask you to shorten your nick? - just jocking, good practice for me to write in English)

I'm glad your friend enjoed the skiing resort and I'm sure he'd enjoed the mountains too. Ask him what cultural shok he received while attending the country. But I hope he had a good time there.

About "Borat" I won't arguie with you about in what exactly country it was filmed. It wasn't in Kazakhstan for sure. And film is hystericaly shocking and funny. Not the softest sense of humor, so... I impressed with Cohen just because he has the courage to do such a things. Talk about "moral" in the entertainment industry.

My regards.
No problem, you can call me CWW, Croat or, maybe, Web?

Actually a friend said he expected the city to be more Asian. It was a business trip, he was taken around by his hosts, locals in Alma Ata, and he saw some nice restaurants and clubs.

According to www searches I've just done, looks Kazakhstan is a prosperous place, and that both Almaty and the new capital prosper fairly quickly.
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Old 11-02-2007, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 22,019,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Om Bee View Post
Thank you for your post.
Lately more attention given to archeological sites in Kazakhstan. And I'm very happy about it. I'm sure there is a lot to find - because of Chingyz Khan was there a long time. Have you seen the "Golden Man"? That is one of the most important historical foundings in Kazakhstan.

Wish you the best in your researches.

Regards.

I agree and I know a lot of wonderful excavations are under way still now. I am sure a lot more will be uncovered. "the golden man" ( or was it a warrior Princess !? nobody is sure, still , )is indeed legend amongst archaeologists. I really hope I can visit again one day, I remember my visit with great fondness and I would love to see some of the archaeological sites/digs too. You sound like a lovely and very warm person.
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Old 11-03-2007, 07:29 PM
 
31 posts, read 127,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lolagranola View Post
I've enjoyed reading this thread! I am interested in learning what life is like in former Soviet countries.
Thank you for replay, LolaGranola!

Each new republic unique with their customs and traditions. If you know , it was 15 of them. Some more close to the Europe and some more close to the Middle East and China, but all of them have border with Russia also. So, influence on life in each republic coming from what neighbors around.
I'm writing about Kazakhstan only and maybe later will write about my experiences when I was traveling at the time of Soviet through Russia. But that was time of Soviet and there are so many changes since.
By reading this thread you'd probably already have a bit of idea how it is life in Kazakhstan.

Regards.
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Old 11-03-2007, 08:04 PM
 
31 posts, read 127,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sponger42 View Post
Om Bee, thanks for your replies. Regarding racism and gaps in social status; I was merely suggesting that these are the two big factors that have historically destabilized countries in "our" hemisphere like Venezuala and Cuba. I'm glad to hear that racism is not a problem in Kz, and that people have a positive attitude about the income gap.

What do you think is the best solution to the nationality question? Should the Russians try to assimilate better and not discriminate against non-Russians? Should the Kazaks be more accepting and not worry about foreign backgrounds?

I guess the answer is obviously "yes" to both but how do you get people to change?

I would like to go skiing in Kz.

Is there any open-air prospecting? In mountains not far from where I live, you can go for a walk and find precious and semi-precious stones just lying around on the ground--if you are very, very lucky that is. And, even if you don't find anything, at least you had a nice walk. When you talked about mineral wealth, that sort of thing just came to my mind. Is there anything like that in Kz or is it all just "potassium" mines?
Hi, Sponger42!

What do I think about nationality question? Particulary in Kazakhstan, I think that the biggest stupor on it right now - language question. Kazakhs want everybody will start to learn their language (by law it is official language right now), but more than half country's population speaking russian. I guess government should deal with it - if they want to change all official documentation on kazakh language, then they will lose in so many ways. My opinion on that - each piece of paper has two sides. Use one for kazakh language, other one for russian. That's it.

Yea, if you'll go to the mountains, you could go practicaly very free for the walk. I'm not promise to you, that you'll find there presious stones, but there is place - calls "Big Almaty's lake" - that is pearl by itself, if you have enough breath to reach it.

Lake itself surrounded by mountains and so cold even at the summer time, that, I believe, there is not even fish or any other life form could live in it.
You could see reflection of the mountains in the lake and reflection of the sky. Very-very beautiful. There is some places where I guess you could find some stones (not only petrolium), but I'm not geologist, so I could not name for you any. What you could do, if you are really interested - in Almaty there is geological museum, where they showing different minerals and calling names of places, where they founded it - so, take some pen and paper, when attending.

My regards, and if you'd ever go there for skiing, I wish you the good time for you and joyment.
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Old 11-03-2007, 08:19 PM
 
31 posts, read 127,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CroatWebWanderer View Post
No problem, you can call me CWW, Croat or, maybe, Web?

Actually a friend said he expected the city to be more Asian. It was a business trip, he was taken around by his hosts, locals in Alma Ata, and he saw some nice restaurants and clubs.

According to www searches I've just done, looks Kazakhstan is a prosperous place, and that both Almaty and the new capital prosper fairly quickly.
Hi, Weby!

Yea, if he'll go to the country again tell him to attend Shymkent - it will meet his expectations. Almaty is very-very multinational. Perhaps, do not call kazakhs "asians" or "oriental", some of them very pissed off on that.

Compare to some other post Soviet republics, yes, Kazakhstan is developing pretty fast.
But you also could find another side of Kazakhstan - where people are living in very poor condition, not enough health care, where man will dominate in the family and put woman down... Every coin has two sides.

My regards to you.
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Old 11-03-2007, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Lake Country, Wisconsin
396 posts, read 1,513,669 times
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My brother was in the Peace Corps there about 12 years ago. He really liked the people there. He taught English in a very small town and was the first American to be stationed there. Everyone was very friendly and helpful. He had to bury his potatos in the dirt floor of a garage for the winter, which I found interesting. Also things like plastic wrap were non existant. He did come back a vegetarian(too many sheep head's I think) and also would tell everyone he couldn't drink because of his religion(made that up as most could drink him under the table) He also became fluent in Russian. He has alot of great stories from his time there.
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Old 11-03-2007, 08:55 PM
 
31 posts, read 127,095 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
I agree and I know a lot of wonderful excavations are under way still now. I am sure a lot more will be uncovered. "the golden man" ( or was it a warrior Princess !? nobody is sure, still , )is indeed legend amongst archaeologists. I really hope I can visit again one day, I remember my visit with great fondness and I would love to see some of the archaeological sites/digs too. You sound like a lovely and very warm person.
Hi, Mooseketeer!

"Golden man" hah? You'd probably know more about him/her than me. National museum of Kazakhstan was in States with it exibits, I believe in 2 cities, one of which is New-York last year.
Story that I heard about the "golden man" - that it was acctualy very young boy-warrier in some very high position at that time, when he passed away. Perhaps some son of some khan maybe.

A bit from my experience on foundings. In Almaty there is place in the city calls "Tastak" where people live in houses. A few houses were build on the hill. Later, they found some archeological "goodies" under it. Another thing I heard that at the time of Chingiz Khan, they had a tradition to barry their wariers and put hill above the grave. When I was living in Kazakhstan and often go out of city into the hills I was always wondering which one is natural, and which one has "secret" beneth it.

Influence of Chingiz Khan is still very great between kazakh people. They still have 3 dzhuzes - formed after three sons of Chingiz Khan. Genetic influence of tatar-mongol "Gold Orda" also strong among kazakhs. They have black hair, dark eyes. Before that - I heard they looked with very light or red color hair and light color eyes. Sometimes in the northern area of Kazakhstan you could still meet people like that.

Thank you for your compliment on my persona, but I'm not always like that. Sometimes I could be very harsh and ironic.

My best regards to you. Maybe you could tell some story about your archeological foundings in Kazakhstan? If it is not confidential, of course.

Best wishes and good luck in your archeological vetures.
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Old 11-03-2007, 09:23 PM
 
31 posts, read 127,095 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunflower53072 View Post
My brother was in the Peace Corps there about 12 years ago. He really liked the people there. He taught English in a very small town and was the first American to be stationed there. Everyone was very friendly and helpful. He had to bury his potatos in the dirt floor of a garage for the winter, which I found interesting. Also things like plastic wrap were non existant. He did come back a vegetarian(too many sheep head's I think) and also would tell everyone he couldn't drink because of his religion(made that up as most could drink him under the table) He also became fluent in Russian. He has alot of great stories from his time there.
Hi, Sunflower53072!

No, kidding! Became a vegetarian after visiting Kazakhstan? Yea, I supose - too much ship heads!

About potatoes - yes, there is a lot of people using that kind of saving the vegetables for the winter time. They would put potatoes, onion, garlic, carrot, beet eathier in their basement under their house (which doesn't have any hitter in it and tmperature is always like in refregirator, or simply they will dig some hole in the ground and put vegetabeles there. It saving big amount of vegetabeles fresh all the winter and they can have their "vitamins" at winter time.

Yeap, 12 years ago - no plastic, especcialy if your brother was in the small town. What city he was in? Was he living with some local family or it was some camp from his organization? Maybe he would like to share some stories here?

If he'd became fluent in russian, I guess he spent a long time among locals. It is not easy language for the learning. Specificaly for the americans, because roots of language very different and rules of grammar sometimes very confusing. What about kazakh language? Probably he'd pick up a few words of it too.

Ask him, if he would like to visit that city again.

With the way politics going in Kazakhstan right now - my opinion, that people should learn English more.

My best regards.
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