U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-17-2013, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,857,765 times
Reputation: 797

Advertisements

[quote=zilam98;29615129]and what about korean, german, french, chinese, etc? how do they compare to filipino english accents?[/

I find it hard understanding Chinese English... Strange mainland Chinese and Chinese from Hongkong and Macau have the same accent when they speak English. They sound so nasal.

I love French English... It's so sexy to me. It's like they are still speaking French. I love French English and Spanish English ( Antonio Banderas' English accent is really sexy ).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-18-2013, 12:18 PM
 
1,447 posts, read 1,847,731 times
Reputation: 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter Brimelow View Post
Filipino English accent sounds funny to the ears of North Americans, Brits, and Australians.


what i was really asking about was their syllabic accent, if those other nationalities that dont speak english as native language (e.g. germans, russians, chinese, koreans, japanese, french, thai, saudi arabians etc) have more consistently correct syllable accenting compared to filipinos'.

dont just say filipino english accent sounds funny if you havent even heard other nations who dont speak english natively when they speak english. try to be rational, won't you?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,857,765 times
Reputation: 797
I wonder if Brits find American accent funny as well since it is very different from theirs.

Kiwi accent is kind of weird and funny to me. I guess it is the funnniest one to me among the English Native Speakers. They pronounce the " Red " " Read " .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Western Oregon
472 posts, read 481,478 times
Reputation: 374
I learned from professor John McWhorter that Tagalog varies in shades from north to south Phillipines. The farther the distance, the harder to understand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Western Oregon
472 posts, read 481,478 times
Reputation: 374
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
I wonder if Brits find American accent funny as well since it is very different from theirs.

Kiwi accent is kind of weird and funny to me. I guess it is the funnniest one to me among the English Native Speakers. They pronounce the " Red " " Read " .
Well yeah, and even within the USA there is so much variety of accents. I remember a few times I could hardly understand what someone from another part of the USA was saying.

That's the nature of human language--differences are the rule, not the exception. TV and movies keep some similarity going, but variation is the norm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 10:54 PM
 
1,447 posts, read 1,847,731 times
Reputation: 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by 97701 View Post
Well yeah, and even within the USA there is so much variety of accents. I remember a few times I could hardly understand what someone from another part of the USA was saying.

That's the nature of human language--differences are the rule, not the exception. TV and movies keep some similarity going, but variation is the norm.
i agree. in as much as there are different nationalities existing, with variations in each nationality, there should be diversity in languages as well. no language should be seen or heard as funny just because it's different.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Western Oregon
472 posts, read 481,478 times
Reputation: 374
The important thing is that we communicate with people from other places instead of closing off our world. That is important if you want to learn more. If we disregard people because we don't understand them, and we make no effort to understand them, we are limiting our comprehension to our own little part of the world, when we could be learning more. I have lived in different places and I have learned so much everywhere. Honestly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-18-2013, 11:22 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,012,935 times
Reputation: 1798
Indigenous languages of Mindanao


The Kadayawan Festival 2008 Preview - YouTube

At 1:05 you can hear how they say the same sentence in all these different languages on Mindanao
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2013, 11:28 AM
bg7
 
7,697 posts, read 8,183,133 times
Reputation: 15093
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilam98 View Post
and what about korean, german, french, chinese, etc? how do they compare to filipino english accents?

See my previous post re. accent versus the suprasegmental issue in Filipino-English. The reason it sounds odd to many Western ears is the emphasis on the "wrong" syllable or the "wrong" word in the sentence, its not an accent issue per se. In any event, Filipino-English is its own brand of English, which is fine.

As one other poster maintained - communication is the key - as long as we can communicate thats all that matters!

However, the poster with the normative ideal that each langauge should be sound-neutral to all listeners is silly, just some PC idea. If you don't understand the vocabulary, then a language is just a series of sounds to which you will have a non-language response. Mandarin sounds pleasantaly sing-songy to me, Japanese sounds angry sometimes and sultry other times, german sounds officious, Italian mellifluous etc etc.. To pretend that each sound has equal effect on each individual is daft. We can rationalize it sure, but to pretend there is no emotive response prior to that rationalization ....... uh huh if you wanna pretend go ahead
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-20-2013, 05:47 PM
 
1,447 posts, read 1,847,731 times
Reputation: 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
See my previous post re. accent versus the suprasegmental issue in Filipino-English. The reason it sounds odd to many Western ears is the emphasis on the "wrong" syllable or the "wrong" word in the sentence, its not an accent issue per se. In any event, Filipino-English is its own brand of English, which is fine.

As one other poster maintained - communication is the key - as long as we can communicate thats all that matters!

However, the poster with the normative ideal that each langauge should be sound-neutral to all listeners is silly, just some PC idea. If you don't understand the vocabulary, then a language is just a series of sounds to which you will have a non-language response. Mandarin sounds pleasantaly sing-songy to me, Japanese sounds angry sometimes and sultry other times, german sounds officious, Italian mellifluous etc etc.. To pretend that each sound has equal effect on each individual is daft. We can rationalize it sure, but to pretend there is no emotive response prior to that rationalization ....... uh huh if you wanna pretend go ahead
of course, we all know that anyone who doesnt speak english as first language is bound to have less than ideal/perfect/correct english communication skills.

what im asking is if the germans, koreans, russians, chinese, japanese, french, etc--any nationality that is non-native english speaking--have better/more consistently correct syllable accenting compared to filipinos. i did NOT say about their pronunciation. i get what you're pointing at. like say the word "accurate". in native english speaking, the correct accent should be on the first syllable, but filipinos tend to accent the second syllable. now, do those non-native english speaking nationalities accent the same way as the filipinos or are they more consistently correct with their syllable accenting?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top