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Old 05-14-2013, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,965,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I think one of the above pictures that was supposedly taken in the 18th century (1700-1799) should actually be labeled the 19th century (1800-1899) because photography did not exist in the 18th century.
University of Santo Tomas or Colegio de Santo Tomas. it's considered 17th century (founded April 28, 1611) and was hit and destroyed a part of it during WWII. It is 402 yrs old University.


UST Official Video (Brief ust history) - YouTube

Some of the old building those early 20th century building need to maintain
and preserved. The Santo Domingo church that was used to be in Intramuros was moved to other place in Metro Manila. Santo Domingo was moved to Quezon City because it was totally damaged during WWII, but the building is not like what it used to be. Nuestra Senora de La Naval was also moved there.


Old Town Manila - Intramuros - YouTube

Last edited by pinai; 05-14-2013 at 11:06 PM..
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Old 05-14-2013, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Filipinas
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There is also another forgotten landmark near Intramuros and Pasig
was the Magellan Monument that used to stand there.






It was destroyed in WWII


Old Philippines - Spanish Manila Forgotten Landmark (Magellan Monument) - YouTube

But there is also a Magellan Monument in Cebu built in 1866




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Old 05-14-2013, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinai View Post
There is also another forgotten landmark near Intramuros and Pasig
was the Magellan Monument that used to stand there.






It was destroyed in WWII


Old Philippines - Spanish Manila Forgotten Landmark (Magellan Monument) - YouTube

But there is also a Magellan Monument in Cebu built in 1866



I don't understand why the Americans didn't bother to rebuild colonial buildings or landmarks that were bombed, after all I believe Manila wouldn't have been bombed if there were no Americans there. And Landmarks are probably not that hard to build again at that time especially there were still vacant.

Speaking of Magellan, I don't know why his name had to be changed in our history books as well. He was a Portuguese and his name was a bit hard to pronounce Fernao de Magalhaes but they could have at least translated it to Spanish Fernando de Magallanes. I only found out his name was not really Ferdinand Magellan when I went to Portugal before and I saw hi monument there.
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Old 05-15-2013, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
I don't understand why the Americans didn't bother to rebuild colonial buildings or landmarks that were bombed, after all I believe Manila wouldn't have been bombed if there were no Americans there. And Landmarks are probably not that hard to build again at that time especially there were still vacant.

Speaking of Magellan, I don't know why his name had to be changed in our history books as well. He was a Portuguese and his name was a bit hard to pronounce Fernao de Magalhaes but they could have at least translated it to Spanish Fernando de Magallanes. I only found out his name was not really Ferdinand Magellan when I went to Portugal before and I saw hi monument there.
They should help the Philippines built those destroyed buildings but instead after 1 yr when most of these landmark turned into dust they gave us 'independence' at least they should help us built those damage buildings and landmark where it used to stand, you know Japan gave money to re-built the Maestranza in Intramuros at least. I don't know if Americans gave money for those destroyed landmarks specially those Spanish buildings specially that the Americans goal is to delete the Spanish in the Philippines and expand the english. Americans contributed more in Baguio City but some areas in Manila used to be a Spanish name street or bridge was also replaced to American Names like Taft Avenue, Jones Bridge, Blumentritt etc. They should just give the credit to the original who built it lol

Last edited by pinai; 05-15-2013 at 12:33 AM..
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Old 05-15-2013, 12:53 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinai View Post
They should help the Philippines built those destroyed buildings but instead after 1 yr when most of these landmark turned into dust they gave us 'independence' at least they should help us built those damage buildings and landmark where it used to stand, you know Japan gave money to re-built the Maestranza in Intramuros at least. I don't know if Americans gave money for those destroyed landmarks specially those Spanish buildings specially that the Americans goal is to delete the Spanish in the Philippines and expand the english. Americans contributed more in Baguio City but some areas in Manila used to be a Spanish name street or bridge was also replaced to American Names like Taft Avenue, Jones Bridge, Blumentritt etc. They should just give the credit to the original who built it lol
I agree with you. They shouldn't have replaced the names in English. Those streets and bridges were already built long before they came and occupied the country, it was disrespectful of them changing the names for English.
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Old 05-15-2013, 01:11 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
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Intramuros Manila Film in 1965

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VN5g5SG6r5Q
Intramuros as described by Nick Joaquin
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Old 05-15-2013, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
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Another Landmark that you'll see in Manila that survive in WWII is the
Legazpi-Urdaneta Monument
Built in 1891




Quote:
Legazpi-Urdaneta Monument.
Located at the corner of Burgos and Bonifacio Drive, the statue was erected in memory of Spanish conquistador Miguel Lopez de Legazpi and Augustinian Fr. Andres de Urdaneta.

The project for its construction began in 1891 when Governor-General Valeriano Weyler signed a decree creating a council to take charge of collection subscriptions for the monument. It was awarded to Agustin Querol as sculptor and Luis Maria Cabello as architect. The monument was finished in Spain and brought to the Philippines.
The timing was unfortunate, however, for it was already the end of Spanish rule. The statue was left in storage at the Customs Building in San Nicolas It was erected during the American period, survived World War II, and still stands today at its original site.

The marble pedestal is four-sided and topped by figures of Legazpi and Urdaneta. Ther conquestador is dressed in armor and carries the Spanish flag in his left hand while his extended right hand clutches a rolled-up document symbolizing the possession of the city. Urdaneta is dressed in his Augustinian habit with a crucifix in his raised right hand and a Bible on his left. On the side facing Bagumdayan Drive (now Burgos Drive) is a compass, rope and laurel wreath with the words URDANETA, MDLXVII (1568). The symbol represent Urdaneta’s role as the navigator of the Legazpi expedition.

Facing Intramuros are the coat of arms of Spain with the motto “NE PLUS ULTRA”; while facing the sea is the word LEGAZPI with the date MDCLXXII (1572), a crown and helmet with oak and palm leaves. The symbols represent Legazpi’s role as conquistador of the Philippines Facing Roxas Boulevard is a draped figure of a woman with a laurel wreath and a medallion with a cross at her breast. Her right arm is raised, index finger pointing upward. A slab before her bears the inscription XXIV JUNIO, MDLXXI (June 24, 1571), the date of the foundation of the City of Manila. The entire monument is fenced off with an iron railing.

From the book “Ciudad Murada, a Walk Through Historical Intramuros” by Jose Victor Z. Torres. A book that I highly recommend.
Anda Monument built in 1871






Quote:
Located in the Anda Circle along Bonifacio Drive, this monument in memory of Governor General Simon de Anda was originally located in front of Fort Santiago. Simon de Anda fought against invading British troops.
Queen Isabella II Monument (1860)





Quote:
The Queen of Spain, Reina Isabel II instructed Ponciano Ponzano, a Spanish sculptor to cast a bronze statue of her image and likeness, which will be shipped to Manila where it will be erected in her honor. The statue of the queen arrived in the Philippine soil on July 14, 1860, with much pomp and pageantry as if the queen in her flesh came. It was first erected at the Plaza Arroceros. Due to the queen’s mismanagement of her royal court, an uprising known as the Carlist Revolution of 1868 was plotted against her. She went into an exile and was replaced by her son.

Meanwhile in the Philippines, a new government was established, in the person of Governor General Carlos Maria de la Torre, a Carlist. His first anti-Bourbon move in the islands was to dismantle the former queen’s statue and to dump it in a bodega. Due to the fear that the statue will be melted down and its iron be used for other purposes, the Sociedad Economica de Amigos de Pais requested that they would like to keep it as a work of art. But because it was not funded by the Spanish Government in the Philippines,

it was not handed to them. It was instead stored in one of the bodegas inside the Ayuntamiento. When the Anti-Bourbon campaign slightly subsided, the statue finally found a new place to stand. In 1896, Malate Church served as her second home. It stood there until fierce typhoon Yoling toppled her down in 1970. The statue was returned to Intramuros in 1975, when it was restored in time for the state visit of her great great-grandson Principe Carlos, later King Carlos of Spain. How befitting that she was installed near an ancient gate where her name was also inscribed, the Puerta Isabel II.

Last edited by pinai; 05-15-2013 at 05:27 AM..
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Old 05-15-2013, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,965,031 times
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Another Historical Site in Manila is Paco Park & Cemetery built in 1820





Quote:
Located in General Luna Street, Paco Park was built by the Dominican Fathers in 1820 for the purpose of burying the dead of the Spanish elites. It was once the municipal cemetery of Manila for autocratic families who resided in old Manila or Intramuros during the Spanish colonial era. Dr. Jose P Rizal was interred there after his execution and was later exhumed and was buried back to Luneta a.k.a. Bagumbayan, where he was executed.

It is now a recreational area where, when Friday arrives, “Paco Park Presents” feature the finest musical talents and chorales. Local and guest stars perform for an evening of classical and traditional Filipino music.

Laarnie Losala at Paco Park 2/2 - YouTube
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Old 05-15-2013, 11:18 AM
bg7
 
7,697 posts, read 8,163,628 times
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Its very sad what was lost, especially considering the ugliness of Manila today.

They Government should pressure the Japanese for a huge donation to restore Intramuros (ultimately, it was their fault whether American bombing did most damage or not).
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Old 05-15-2013, 05:09 PM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,668,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
I don't understand why the Americans didn't bother to rebuild colonial buildings or landmarks that were bombed, after all I believe Manila wouldn't have been bombed if there were no Americans there. And Landmarks are probably not that hard to build again at that time especially there were still vacant.

Speaking of Magellan, I don't know why his name had to be changed in our history books as well. He was a Portuguese and his name was a bit hard to pronounce Fernao de Magalhaes but they could have at least translated it to Spanish Fernando de Magallanes. I only found out his name was not really Ferdinand Magellan when I went to Portugal before and I saw hi monument there.
I don't think it's only in the Philippines that the name was changed to Magellan. A lot of names in earlier history had been translated to different versions in different languages. Columbus is actually Colombo in Italian and Colon in Spanish. Most names from the Bible and the names of saints have different versions in different languages, and earlier historical figures often have their names "translated". Most English books will use King Philip of Spain instead of King Felipe. It is only in recent times that they mostly use the original names for monarchs. Papal names are still translated though. Pope John Paul is officially Ioannes Paulus (Latin) but can be written as Giovanni Paulo, Juan Pablo, Joao Paulo, Johannes Paul, Jean-Paul, etc. in various languages.
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