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Old 07-07-2013, 01:17 PM
 
164 posts, read 219,089 times
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Hello,

in the USA while it is legally straight forward and black and white where the borders are between Canada and the USA and Mexico and the USA, socially and culturally, the line is rather ambiguous. Instead as one moves away from the USA-Mexico border southward, Mexico gradually becomes more Mexican and as one moves northward America becomes more American. Similar for Canada. Here are some examples:

1. TJ and San Diego are divided by a border, yet San Diego is heavily Mexican in some ways, many Americans visit TJ for day trips, and there are plenty of Americans living in TJ and English speaking stores that accept dollars.

2. Some Texas border towns have Mexican American majorities, speak Spanish and it is possible for some Mexicans who live right over the border to get border crossing cards enabling them to walk across for a day or two.

3. In Upstate New York, near the Quebec border, many Americans are ethnically similar to French Canadians and actually speak French and there are many Canadians who cross over for an hour or so to visit Niagra falls.

4. Some towns on the US Canada border actually overlap and some stores in Canada near the border have many American shoppers and take US dollars.

My question is the following:

China is bordered by India and Russia. Is the situation between the borders similar. For instance, is there any social or culture overlap between China and India or China and Russia along the border.

In other words:

1. Is the area of India near the border of China at all Chinese culturally, demographically, and socially and vice versa. Are there Chinese people living in India along and the border and Indian people living in China along the border or are the worlds across the border completely different.

2. Are the southern areas of Russia near Chinese border crossings somewhat Chinese in terms of people culture, and demographics? Are there any Russians living in the far North of China.

In other words, are the borders between China and Russia and India like the borders between East and West Germany where the worlds were completely different or are they similar to the US-Mexico border where it takes a few miles for one to truly be in a different country?

Thanks
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Old 07-07-2013, 01:48 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,807 posts, read 70,635,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelOrear View Post
Hello,

in the USA while it is legally straight forward and black and white where the borders are between Canada and the USA and Mexico and the USA, socially and culturally, the line is rather ambiguous. Instead as one moves away from the USA-Mexico border southward, Mexico gradually becomes more Mexican and as one moves northward America becomes more American. Similar for Canada. Here are some examples:

1. TJ and San Diego are divided by a border, yet San Diego is heavily Mexican in some ways, many Americans visit TJ for day trips, and there are plenty of Americans living in TJ and English speaking stores that accept dollars.

2. Some Texas border towns have Mexican American majorities, speak Spanish and it is possible for some Mexicans who live right over the border to get border crossing cards enabling them to walk across for a day or two.

3. In Upstate New York, near the Quebec border, many Americans are ethnically similar to French Canadians and actually speak French and there are many Canadians who cross over for an hour or so to visit Niagra falls.

4. Some towns on the US Canada border actually overlap and some stores in Canada near the border have many American shoppers and take US dollars.

My question is the following:

China is bordered by India and Russia. Is the situation between the borders similar. For instance, is there any social or culture overlap between China and India or China and Russia along the border.

In other words:

1. Is the area of India near the border of China at all Chinese culturally, demographically, and socially and vice versa. Are there Chinese people living in India along and the border and Indian people living in China along the border or are the worlds across the border completely different.

2. Are the southern areas of Russia near Chinese border crossings somewhat Chinese in terms of people culture, and demographics? Are there any Russians living in the far North of China.

In other words, are the borders between China and Russia and India like the borders between East and West Germany where the worlds were completely different or are they similar to the US-Mexico border where it takes a few miles for one to truly be in a different country?

Thanks
There are a lot of Chinese along the Russo-Chinese border. There are also Chinese traders who cross back and forth, selling goods. Furthermore, China is leasing property away from the border, deeper into Siberia, that's being farmed by its own people. And finally, some of the border areas are populated by Native peoples who share characteristics with ethnic minorities in China, or have some Chinese ancestry.
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Old 07-07-2013, 03:29 PM
 
6,726 posts, read 6,611,101 times
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India really shares the border with "Tibet", so there are not so many ethnic Chinese (not so many people at all).

Some Chinese work in Russia, but most are short-term residents.
Some Russians live/work in China too.

The far west of China shares borders with a bunch of *stans. People from both sides are culturally related there.
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Old 07-07-2013, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,292,936 times
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There are a lot of border crossings in the world that are open to people that have residence cards of the two countries, but not to travelers with other nationality. I found one on the Austrian -Yugoslavian border, when Yugoslavia was still whole. At Victoria Point, Myanmar, hundreds of Burmese cross over to work as day laborers in Thailand, but the border is not open to anyone of any other nationality. Women from the Malawian island of Likoma go over to Mozambique to market, but the border is not open to anyone else. The first time I was in Leticia, Colombia, people could wander freely across the borders into a Brazilian village, but I suspect that is more formalized now. Those are the ones I've encountered myself, there must be thousands more.

There is a town on the Brazil/Uruguay border (Chuy) where anyone can freely wander back and forth across the border at any time, but you need to show documents to immigration officers when leaving the town going into Brazil or Uruguay. One side of the street is in Brazil, the other in Uruguay: http://www.uruguay-info.net/images/chuy_border_road.jpg
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Old 07-08-2013, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Jersey
2,299 posts, read 3,399,461 times
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A small number of Tibetans live in Kashmir, but that's about it. The border between India and China is mountainous and extremely sparsely populated. However, there is a high degree of overlap in Nepal with the people of the lowlands being typical Hindus while the highlands have people who belong to cultures more related to Tibet/China.
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Old 07-09-2013, 08:49 AM
 
12,301 posts, read 18,421,290 times
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I can't tell you about the other borders but I can tell you China-India is in some remote ground, with Nepal acting like a buffer between India and China. And there you have Tibet - and the border there, at least on the Tibet side, is some last century iron curtain "red China"/Berlin Wall type sh*t (compared to the rest of China, which I have been to several times). Very very difficult to cross, and I tried as a tourist from Nepal - just too much red tape. Yeah, we are talking about PRC soldiers at the border and patrolling the border, shooting to kill chinese citizens who try to illegally cross over to "the west".

Of interest however, culturally I noticed a very significant difference between Nepalese living in the valleys of, say, Kathmandu and the more mountanous areas. Kathmandu being Hindu and resembling the population on the Indian sub-continent. The mountainous areas closer to the border being Bhuddist and definetly more asian looking.
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Old 12-14-2013, 04:04 AM
 
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Historically, indian subcontinent has always been isloated from neighboring areas by the Himalayas on the north , and the indian ocean everywhere else.

The himalayas separate india from china , so for all practical purposes, there could well have been a large ocean between india and china , as far as cultural mixing is concerned.
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Old 12-14-2013, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,256,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I can't tell you about the other borders but I can tell you China-India is in some remote ground, with Nepal acting like a buffer between India and China. And there you have Tibet - and the border there, at least on the Tibet side, is some last century iron curtain "red China"/Berlin Wall type sh*t (compared to the rest of China, which I have been to several times). Very very difficult to cross, and I tried as a tourist from Nepal - just too much red tape. Yeah, we are talking about PRC soldiers at the border and patrolling the border, shooting to kill chinese citizens who try to illegally cross over to "the west".

Of interest however, culturally I noticed a very significant difference between Nepalese living in the valleys of, say, Kathmandu and the more mountanous areas. Kathmandu being Hindu and resembling the population on the Indian sub-continent. The mountainous areas closer to the border being Bhuddist and definetly more asian looking.
Yes, the valleys and gangetic plain are more culturally Indic. They speak nepali, similar to Hindi, and are mostly Hindu.
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Old 12-14-2013, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,256,138 times
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There were a lot of Chinese in russia and Russians in china before the communist era. Indeed Vladivostok was a Chinese city. Now cross border trade and migration is picking up again.
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Old 12-14-2013, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,540 posts, read 3,274,092 times
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As a Canadian ( note my screen name ) I have to correct the OP about a few things.

First, Canadians don't have to cross the border, to see Niagara Falls . We have a lovely view of the falls , from Niagara Falls, Ontario. The Niagara river forms a part of the International border, between Canada and the United States.

Yes a FEW Americans, who live near the International boundary, do speak French. Speaking a language has nothing to do with "ethnicity ". The ability to speak a language is no indicator of race or nationality, either. My Wife speaks fluent Mandarin, although she was born in The Bahamas. She learned it for her career advancement.

Yes, some retail stores in Canada, near the border, do take US currency, although they have no legal requirement to do so, under Canadian law. It is a choice that individual business owners make. They know that when they go to their bank in Canada, to deposit US currency, they will be paying a service charge to do so. Of course, when the situation is reversed, and a Canadian wants to pay with Canadian cash in the USA, the laughter is loud, and the refusal is likely to be rude, and abrupt.

Although the US has required that ALL persons wanting to enter the USA MUST have a valid passport, or a "enhanced State issued driver's license" since July of 2009, hundreds of Americans are turned away, at the Canadian border, every day of the year. Canada does not want to be stuck with Americans, who can't prove their citizenship at the US border, so we deny them entry to Canada. How long will it take for this fact to register with the American public ?

And don't even mention the subject of guns, at the border. We confiscate dozens of them a week, across Canada, at the border, and in some cases, the person with the gun ends up in jail in Canada.

Jim B.

Toronto.
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