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Old 07-29-2013, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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And after what point do you no longer think of yourself as 'Chinese'?

Especially if they are culturally Thai, speak Thai, mostly eat Thai food, practise Theravada Buddhism.etc and do not practice any Chinese culture (other than Thai culture influenced by China), would they just consider themselves 'Thai' or Chinese Thai?

After all, Thais also largely come from China, but they don't consider themselves 'Chinese' rather just Thai.

After how long does someone just become 'Thai' as opposed to Thai-Chinese?

Isn't it all just a matter of self-identification?

 
Old 07-30-2013, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Earth
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I know two sisters. One says she is Thai and the other says she is Chinese.
 
Old 07-30-2013, 03:37 AM
 
Location: SGV, CA
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My Thai-Chinese American friend told me he identifies himself as Chinese to his ethnic Thai friends, Thai-Chinese to his Chinese friends and Thai to everyone else.
 
Old 07-30-2013, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Interesting. Yeah, I think you're mostly whatever you identify yourself as. Language and religion largely define you more than ancestry iMO.
 
Old 02-05-2014, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by red4ce View Post
My Thai-Chinese American friend told me he identifies himself as Chinese to his ethnic Thai friends, Thai-Chinese to his Chinese friends and Thai to everyone else.
It's interesting hearing perspectives from those who have Chinese ancestry but retain little or no of the that culture, and do not speak Chinese, like myself.

Wondering if any Thai experts here can share their observations/insight?
 
Old 02-05-2014, 08:48 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, California
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probably the same as a Chinese that practices American culture, to other Chinese they say they are Chinese, to whites they say they are Chinese American or some say they are American if they have lived in the USA a long time
 
Old 02-05-2014, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr bolo View Post
probably the same as a Chinese that practices American culture, to other Chinese they say they are Chinese, to whites they say they are Chinese American or some say they are American if they have lived in the USA a long time
I usually just say I'm Australian if someone asks, and if they ask more I tell them my parents are from Singapore and Malaysia.
 
Old 02-05-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, California
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If I lived in Thailand all my life , I would probably identify as a Thai

the more recent immigrants would probably mention Chinese since they would not be fully assimilated into Thai culture / language
 
Old 02-05-2014, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr bolo View Post
If I lived in Thailand all my life , I would probably identify as a Thai

the more recent immigrants would probably mention Chinese since they would not be fully assimilated into Thai culture / language
Does Thailand even still get a lot of immigrants from China? I know it gets a lot of Chinese tourists, though.
 
Old 02-06-2014, 07:06 AM
 
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Well, think of this way, an American of Chinese origin will still be a Chinese American in 100 years, no matter how little connection he or she still maintains with China.

Plus, China is a great country with very strong culture and tradition (which doesn't apply to many countries on the earth). I don't see the point of trying not to identify oneself as Chinese when he is one.
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