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Old 08-26-2013, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Most K-pop and J-pop, and for that matter a lot of the more modern Catonese and Mandarin pop music, seems just to be really western/modern in style, sometimes with a lot of English lyrics. In contrast, Indian pop music stills seems to incorporate a lot of traditional Indian styles, like the tabla/beat, the vocal style, the melodies.etc...while there's a place for straight electronic dance pop with Korean lyrics, it'd be nice to see more traditional Korean music - the melodies, instrumentation, vocal delivery, even lyrics, in modern Korean pop music. I listened to even some older Chinese pop, like Teresa Teng, and it has an 'oriental flavour'. Has this sort of gone out of vogue in East Asia?

 
Old 08-27-2013, 09:56 AM
 
Location: SGV, CA
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I hope not. Traditional music is a beautiful artistic and technical endeavor that should not be cheapened by shoehorning it into modern pop. The copious use of broken English is pretty annoying though.
 
Old 08-27-2013, 10:08 AM
 
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not necessary to integrate both, beauty of the music is to have separate traditional music and contemporary pop.
 
Old 08-27-2013, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by red4ce View Post
I hope not. Traditional music is a beautiful artistic and technical endeavor that should not be cheapened by shoehorning it into modern pop. The copious use of broken English is pretty annoying though.
I agree about how annoying it is
 
Old 08-27-2013, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
I agree about how annoying it is
I guess it could be done wrong, but that's one of the thing I like about some of the Indian pop/dance music songs, how it's still recogniseably Indian not just generic western music in Hindi.etc.
 
Old 08-28-2013, 01:15 AM
 
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I think most Chinese pop songs are still very Chinese. At least you don't hear anything similar in the US.
Well, maybe they are not "Chinese" in a sense that they do not resemble traditional Chinese music that much, but they are still unique.

It seems that Chinese people do not like music with strong beats. The most popular ones are always soft with smooth melody. I also find that there are fewer tone-deaf people in China than in America. Most (like 90%) Chinese can carry a tune, but many Americans cannot.
 
Old 08-28-2013, 02:27 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
I think most Chinese pop songs are still very Chinese. At least you don't hear anything similar in the US.
Well, maybe they are not "Chinese" in a sense that they do not resemble traditional Chinese music that much, but they are still unique.

It seems that Chinese people do not like music with strong beats. The most popular ones are always soft with smooth melody. I also find that there are fewer tone-deaf people in China than in America. Most (like 90%) Chinese can carry a tune, but many Americans cannot.
I asked my mum if it was harder for a tone-deaf person to learn a tonal language. I think speaking a tonal language probably helps with that. I also asked her how Chinese or other tonal languages can be fit to a melody, since the tone defines the meaning.
 
Old 08-28-2013, 08:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I asked my mum if it was harder for a tone-deaf person to learn a tonal language. I think speaking a tonal language probably helps with that. I also asked her how Chinese or other tonal languages can be fit to a melody, since the tone defines the meaning.
Traditional Chinese opera does follow the tones of Chinese languages (to some extent).
Cantonese songs still do that. Mandarin songs usually do not, but there are exceptions.
 
Old 03-13-2014, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Omaha Nebraska and dreamland when I am sleeping
3,096 posts, read 6,473,731 times
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sad though, except for PSY and his one hit Gangnam style in the usa

J-POP and K-POP has never caught on in the states. Guess americans are fickle when it comes to music diversity.




btw, what are some popular K-POP and J-POP bands or singers out there.


Other than PSY and SISTAR http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sistar , I am not familiar with K-POP or J-POP music
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