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Old 09-10-2013, 08:58 PM
 
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There is most definitely plenty of people having interest for travel in Nepal and Bhutan. They have rich ancient history, considered important holy and sacred sites for people following the religion/spirituality from there, and the scenery.

Bhutan is even ranked one of the happiest countries in the world, even if very isolated from most of the world.

What level of influence comes from India and China since Bhutan and Nepal are completely surrounded with those massive, more geographically imposing countries. Is Bhutan and Nepal having any noticeable resemblance to Tibet?
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Old 09-10-2013, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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I would say Nepal is more culturally like India. It can be broadly divided between the lowlands, and the highlands-valleys. People in the lowlands seem pretty much like Indians, their language is similar to Hindi and they're mostly Buddhists. Those in the highlands like the sherpas seem a bit more like Tibetans and many are Buddhist.

Bhutan seems more like Tibet with not that much Indian influence. It's very closed off and expensive to visit.
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Old 09-10-2013, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Sikkim was the third Himalayan nation, between Nepal and Bhutan. It remained independent, choosing not to join India in 1947, but then became an Indian state in 1975. It is very much worth visiting, with wonderful old monasteries and great view of the Himalayas. It can be very cold there even in late spring, if you are not dressed for it, and the people, who are used to it keep all the doors and windows open all the time, with the wind whistling through.

It's necessary to have a special endorsement on your Indian visa to enter Sikkim, and passports are checked and stamped at the border. Even Indians require a permit. I needed visas then for Assam, Maghalaya and Tripura, too, but now they are open for free travel. But travel permits are still required for the other four states up near the Burmese border.

Last edited by jtur88; 09-10-2013 at 10:59 PM..
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Old 09-11-2013, 02:26 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I would say Nepal is more culturally like India. It can be broadly divided between the lowlands, and the highlands-valleys. People in the lowlands seem pretty much like Indians, their language is similar to Hindi and they're mostly Buddhists. Those in the highlands like the sherpas seem a bit more like Tibetans and many are Buddhist.

Bhutan seems more like Tibet with not that much Indian influence. It's very closed off and expensive to visit.
Sorry I meant to say those in the lowlands are mostly Hindus. They also tend to look like Indians. Those in the highlands tend to look between Chinese/Tibetans and Indians. Nepalese food, judging from the Nepalese restaurants I've been to, is more like northern Indian.
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Old 10-20-2013, 01:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I would say Nepal is more culturally like India. It can be broadly divided between the lowlands, and the highlands-valleys. People in the lowlands seem pretty much like Indians, their language is similar to Hindi and they're mostly Buddhists. Those in the highlands like the sherpas seem a bit more like Tibetans and many are Buddhist.

Bhutan seems more like Tibet with not that much Indian influence. It's very closed off and expensive to visit.
Is there ever a time when Nepal was going to be part of India, and something similar to what happened between Tibet-China? Yeah, Nepal feels like a mix of India and Tibet.

I have more interest to visit Bhutan compared to Nepal, even if Nepal is interesting for travel. The exclusive visiting laws in Bhutan is one of the most strict in the world for allowing foreigners to visit there, and a unique opportunity for anyone being able to visit there.

Some people say Bhutan is one of the last countries in the world to get any modernized or globalized influence, rated one of the most happiest countries in the world, and somehow having a not too oppressive monarchy government system easily entering a very late democracy system.



Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Sikkim was the third Himalayan nation, between Nepal and Bhutan. It remained independent, choosing not to join India in 1947, but then became an Indian state in 1975. It is very much worth visiting, with wonderful old monasteries and great view of the Himalayas.

It's necessary to have a special endorsement on your Indian visa to enter Sikkim, and passports are checked and stamped at the border. Even Indians require a permit. I needed visas then for Assam, Maghalaya and Tripura, too, but now they are open for free travel. But travel permits are still required for the other four states up near the Burmese border.
This is interesting news there was a 3rd Himalayan nation existing: Sikkim and then becoming a region of India in the 1970s.

Yeah, the monastery/temples are unique in the Himalayas: Tibet, Bhutan, Nepal, unique Himalayan souvenirs, crafts home furniture items, and intriguing, foreign, and exotic place to visit in the world.

How is Northern India regions: Kashmir, Jammu, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand in Indian Himalayas compared to Sikhkim, Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet?

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 10-20-2013 at 01:12 PM..
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Old 10-20-2013, 01:32 PM
 
12,319 posts, read 18,433,096 times
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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Sorry I meant to say those in the lowlands are mostly Hindus. They also tend to look like Indians. Those in the highlands tend to look between Chinese/Tibetans and Indians. Nepalese food, judging from the Nepalese restaurants I've been to, is more like northern Indian.
Yes, from my experience. The cultural, religious, and ethnical difference is entirely based on geographics, not national borders. The highlands - without any doubt east-asian looking and buddhist. A distinct difference that is obvious to anyone visiting up there. Note that many of the communities in the mountains are unreachable via roads, and thus remain somewhat isolated (although they manage very well via systems of trails, pack animals, and airfields here and there).
Because the politcal center is the Kathmandu valley (i.e. the lowlands), which also holds most of the population, they are more politically and religously aligned with India. That, perhaps, has shifted as the government is politically shifting left, with Maost and communist holding seats of power.
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Old 10-20-2013, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,263,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Is there ever a time when Nepal was going to be part of India, and something similar to what happened between Tibet-China? Yeah, Nepal feels like a mix of India and Tibet.

I have more interest to visit Bhutan compared to Nepal, even if Nepal is interesting for travel. The exclusive visiting laws in Bhutan is one of the most strict in the world for allowing foreigners to visit there, and a unique opportunity for anyone being able to visit there.

Some people say Bhutan is one of the last countries in the world to get any modernized or globalized influence, rated one of the most happiest countries in the world, and somehow having a not too oppressive monarchy government system easily entering a very late democracy system.





This is interesting news there was a 3rd Himalayan nation existing: Sikkim and then becoming a region of India in the 1970s.

Yeah, the monastery/temples are unique in the Himalayas: Tibet, Bhutan, Nepal, unique Himalayan souvenirs, crafts home furniture items, and intriguing, foreign, and exotic place to visit in the world.

How is Northern India regions: Kashmir, Jammu, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand in Indian Himalayas compared to Sikhkim, Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet?
I'm not actually sure about the history of Nepal. I know Siddhartha Gautama was born in Lumbini, which is now in southern Nepal, and that area is part of the Gangetic plain and is pretty culturally like the Gangetic plain.

Bhutan would be indeed interesting to visit for that and other reasons. It's monarch appears benevolent and to really care about his people - seems to, at least, don't know enough about it.

I didn't know about Sikkim, interesting.

Jammu and Kashmir I think are mostly Muslim with Buddhist minorities mostly in the montains like in Ladakh, many exiled Tibetans. There are many ethnic minorities/tribal group in eastern India, most of them look more East Asian than South Asian with their own unique cultures.
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