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Old 11-14-2014, 10:47 PM
 
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[quote=joseanto071;32758224]Are you SERIOUS??? I'm actually studying Chinese. It is more simplistic and straightforward than English and my Native language Spanish. You are the ignorant and judgemental person and you are SO OBLIVIOUS. Spanish and English grammar is much harder and complex than Chinese.

In Chinese, there is no distinction between masculine and feminine, no distinction between past, present or future, or singular and plural. quote]


This is because you are on the very sheer outer layer of the language and you are not even close to the culture yet.

By the way, there is no point to make a comparison on intelligence between these two countries. Chinese and Indian communities in California at the beginning of this year were in the battle fighting against the SCA5 plan and they won. )))

P.S The above sentence is a typical Chinese way of expression. Do you really know what I mean? Am I straightforward enough?

Last edited by lily76; 11-14-2014 at 11:25 PM..

 
Old 11-15-2014, 02:25 AM
 
6,726 posts, read 6,612,834 times
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I think Indians are truly better at presentations and speaking out in class or meetings.
It's not just personality or English skill, it's probably a difference in educational methods.

When I was in graduate school in the US, the Chinese students never talked in class even if some of them spoke quite good English. I think we consider it either a show-off or an embarrassment, and would not do good to our social life.
 
Old 11-15-2014, 10:02 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,273,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joseanto071 View Post
Also, before any of you guys attack me of generalizing or being racist or nationalist. I think this is how it is since this is how Mandarin and Hindi are built. I don't know much about Hindi, but I've seen many Indians express themselves kind of in a more elaborate manner being more rich in adjectives, prefixes, suffixes, tenses, etc. Also adding more "in a way....", "afterwards", "Therefore," "Otherwise.....in a way that....". With Chinese, it's more simplistic and to the point and has fewer adjectives.

Not saying either is better or worse.
or there is another possibility: English is an official language in India while it plays close to no role in China. So Indian people's more sophisticated expression is really a result of better proficiency in the English language compared with the Chinese? Did you also notice an Indian usually has a much vocabulary than a typical Chinese person as well?

Most Indians I know are pretty fluent in English (despite the accent). Half the Chinese I know speak horrible English (small vocabulary, wrong grammar, thick accent, short/simply sentences), and another 25% mediocre, despite many having lived in the US for years.

Chinese culture (and Japanese culture) is as subtle and delicate as it gets if you know it well enough. To say the Chinese has a simplistic and direct way of expression is missing the whole point.

To give an example, it is very unusual for a Chinese person to say "I love you", even between parents and children or lovers, because saying that is a low context approach (most direct and straight forward) to convey emotion, normally adopted by less advanced cultures. There are dozens of more subtle and sophisticated way of expressing complicated emotions without saying words like love or even like. Saying I love you just sounds coarse and uncouth and represent lower class.
 
Old 11-15-2014, 10:11 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,273,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
I think Indians are truly better at presentations and speaking out in class or meetings.
It's not just personality or English skill, it's probably a difference in educational methods.

When I was in graduate school in the US, the Chinese students never talked in class even if some of them spoke quite good English. I think we consider it either a show-off or an embarrassment, and would not do good to our social life.
true.

Indians, like the Americans, are better at communication, or talking.
Although I don't necessarily think it is a good thing. Often I sit in meetings listening to people babbling about things endlessly with little logic, coherence and significance, as if time doesn't matter. It is like they feel they just need to talk to show they know stuff, when they really don't. Repeating things everyone already knows is a colossal waste of time.

I prefer the approach that if you can't add something new, or significant that contributes to the discussion in a meaningful way, then just don't talk. Talking sometimes makes one look powerful and knowledgeable, and sometimes only shows one's weakness and ignorance. And even if you have something to say, always keep it short and to the point. Nobody is interested in other people's endless rambling. I experience too much of it in the work place. Many talk the most, and in the end, they provide next to zero value.

I generally think most Americans in the work place talk too much, unnecessarily. They talk out of the perceived necessity to "participate" or to feel important, not because they have anything to contribute.
 
Old 11-15-2014, 10:24 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,273,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joseanto071 View Post
Are you SERIOUS??? I'm actually studying Chinese. It is more simplistic and straightforward than English and my Native language Spanish. You are the ignorant and judgemental person and you are SO OBLIVIOUS. Spanish and English grammar is much harder and complex than Chinese.

In Chinese, there is no distinction between masculine and feminine, no distinction between past, present or future, or singular and plural. This is one of the things I like about the language. I want to see you try and differentiate between preiterate tense and present indicative tense, or past tense. Next time think or research before you put this asinine comment.
The sophistication about the Chinese language doesn't lie in an overly complicated grammar or sentence structures, but rather the way how human emotions are expressed. The sentences are usually short and easy, but if you understand them based on the words, you are often mistaken, because that's probably not the speaker want to say.

Actually I lean toward the idea that Chinese doesn't have a grammar to speak of, at least not in the western sense. As a beginner you might find it incredibly easier, but later you will find it hard to really master - much more difficult than Spanish which seems to have so many tenses, gender coordination. The Chinese grammar looks like easy and you can just put words together, but as you progress, you will find there are too many tricky things you simply can't master, and the there are rules behind all the randomness only native speaks seem to know intuitively (they won't be able to explain).

Research show it takes 4 times the time for an English speaker to learn Chinese compared with Spanish, which means for an American, the time to fully master Chinese is equal the time required to learn French, Spanish, Italian and German combined.
 
Old 11-15-2014, 01:52 PM
 
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Yes many beginners say Chinese grammar is easy to learn. They will change their mind in a few years.
Very few foreigners can write decent Chinese. In fact I have seen none.
 
Old 11-17-2014, 03:57 PM
 
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Reputation: 10
I just hope this thread doesn't degrade to arguing about the racism of the poster instead of arguing about the point like 99% of threads about comparison.
Equality is rare in nature and with inequality comparison begs the question. This is a valid question plain and simple.
I'm gonna give my POV from dealing with both:
Chinese are shy, which also means they feel a bit friendlier, not talkative, and polite. It is true they are less socially adept (I would never call such a thing social "intelligence"). Note that these characteristics are correlated with intelligence proper, which agrees with my experience. Chinese are more intelligent proper than Indians.
Indians are more social, some of them, not all, can give the impression of rudeness. They are better in trade and less hard-working.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sankar tho View Post
Chinese can be physically identified ( mongoloid) ; Indians can be culturally identified .
Both can be physically identified with equal certainty. Eventhough Indians are Caucasoid, they are a heck of a lot different looking than Europeans and Americans of European origin.

Last edited by Amerez; 11-17-2014 at 04:00 PM.. Reason: spelling
 
Old 11-17-2014, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Washington State
18,586 posts, read 9,605,999 times
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I've worked in China and had many Chinese employees that I managed and I've worked with primarily Indian work force in the Middle East where I managed Indian labor. I'm not sure there is a big difference when it comes to intelligence. I think the Chinese are faster and more focused on the work and the Indians are slower and are more focused on personal interactions. Indians are focused on rules and are more rigid with paperwork and documentation while Chinese are more focused on the work product.

Both typically avoid direct confrontation but I think Chinese are more likely to be more direct but will work hard to not make it seem like confrontation while Indians will be very discreet and almost behind your back if they disagree with something you've requested.

Like all generalizations of this type, there are always exceptions.

I think the Indians will have to learn to move faster to catch the Chinese.
 
Old 11-17-2014, 10:35 PM
 
5 posts, read 8,738 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Yes, I was just dispelling stereotypes might have of studious Asian Americans. Chinese are also very outspoken, a lot of them, in some ways more than most Europeans. They're kind of like Americans, Russians, Italians in that sense. There are regional variations, too, and variations between urban and rural. Some of the friendliest, most warm-hearted people I know are Chinese, while some of the most cruel, cold and callous people are Chinese. Probably the same in most countries.
True. China is a big country with different ethnicity so you cant generalize chinese.
They do make perfect replicas with that talent, im sure they could do more.
 
Old 11-18-2014, 11:12 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,273,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
I've worked in China and had many Chinese employees that I managed and I've worked with primarily Indian work force in the Middle East where I managed Indian labor. I'm not sure there is a big difference when it comes to intelligence. I think the Chinese are faster and more focused on the work and the Indians are slower and are more focused on personal interactions. Indians are focused on rules and are more rigid with paperwork and documentation while Chinese are more focused on the work product.

Both typically avoid direct confrontation but I think Chinese are more likely to be more direct but will work hard to not make it seem like confrontation while Indians will be very discreet and almost behind your back if they disagree with something you've requested.

Like all generalizations of this type, there are always exceptions.

I think the Indians will have to learn to move faster to catch the Chinese.
The Chinese are more focused on the work and getting the work done.
The Indians are more focused on getting credit for the work done, no matter how much they contributed. This is essentially why they like "people interactions".

Of course it is a gross generalization but often stereotypes hold certain truth it them.
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