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Old 12-31-2013, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Does the Philippines have anything like Lotte World in Korea?

Lotte World - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
Old 01-01-2014, 02:02 AM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
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Tiger Beer hit the nail on the head. Japanese folks make up in quantity and diversity where they don't have mega malls. One other aspect to this is their aging population and their depopulating countryside. It's a mixed bag, but typically in smaller cities the suburbs and countryside are being depopulated so land that was cheap and easily developed doesn't see growth. Rather, it shrinks. In fact a lot of ghost malls exist now in Japan. Ghost malls exist elsewhere for a variety of reasons but land overspeculation and depopulation are chief culprits there.

Another reason I can think of is that mega-malls chiefly rely on cars/motorized cycles and large parking lots. Japan ... really doesn't do that sort of thing. Cars are uber expensive to buy and operate in Japan. Just getting your driver's license is ~$3000. In the States, a person can learn from an experienced adult for free essentially and study on their own and simply pay the ~$150 in fees (depending where you live).

Hence you see the bewildering array of smaller-scale shopping malls and small stores in train stations in Japan. And I don't see the possibility of mega-malls opening up really. That's not a bad thing in my opinion.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 05:15 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
Tiger Beer hit the nail on the head. Japanese folks make up in quantity and diversity where they don't have mega malls. One other aspect to this is their aging population and their depopulating countryside. It's a mixed bag, but typically in smaller cities the suburbs and countryside are being depopulated so land that was cheap and easily developed doesn't see growth. Rather, it shrinks. In fact a lot of ghost malls exist now in Japan. Ghost malls exist elsewhere for a variety of reasons but land overspeculation and depopulation are chief culprits there.

Another reason I can think of is that mega-malls chiefly rely on cars/motorized cycles and large parking lots. Japan ... really doesn't do that sort of thing. Cars are uber expensive to buy and operate in Japan. Just getting your driver's license is ~$3000. In the States, a person can learn from an experienced adult for free essentially and study on their own and simply pay the ~$150 in fees (depending where you live).

Hence you see the bewildering array of smaller-scale shopping malls and small stores in train stations in Japan. And I don't see the possibility of mega-malls opening up really. That's not a bad thing in my opinion.
Car ownership is higher in Japan than the Philippines and Singapore in particular, yet Singapore is much more mall dominated. They're not the sprawling Americans malls with huge parking lots, most are serviced by very good public transport. Owning a car in Singapore is very expensive. Even many pretty wealthy pretty in Singapore don't bother with a car, I wouldn't if I lived there even if I could afford both the car and the license.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Does the Philippines have anything like Lotte World in Korea?

Lotte World - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Well Mall of Asia has amusement or small theme park located outside the bay which is part of the mall.
https://www.facebook.com/SMBYamuseme.../photos_albums

the Ice Skating rink is inside the mall as well as the bowling & billiards, we don't have the theme park that has Bahrain City Centre which is Water Theme Park on top of the mall. Kids and family likes this additional theme parks being added as part of the mall because some malls they only have few space for rides etc.

SM Mall of Asia Amusement Park by the bay




There is area for small concert space for live show and entertainment (SM MOA Arena) . I think the price is also affordable for the masses. I heard they're planning to put up a bigger and better theme parks in the area of Pasay City / Paranaque which is also near the SM MOA and hopefully looks much better so let's wait and see.

SM Mall of Asia Arena

Last edited by pinai; 01-01-2014 at 09:19 AM..
 
Old 01-01-2014, 06:28 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Car ownership is higher in Japan than the Philippines and Singapore in particular, yet Singapore is much more mall dominated. They're not the sprawling Americans malls with huge parking lots, most are serviced by very good public transport. Owning a car in Singapore is very expensive. Even many pretty wealthy pretty in Singapore don't bother with a car, I wouldn't if I lived there even if I could afford both the car and the license.
*shrugs*

If you go outside Tokyo you can find huge malls around.

I wonder if land prices have anything to do with it? If so then Singapore is an anomaly in that regard.

And let's not forget we're talking a huge area of land and the shopping and social habits of each people are very different. And, in a sense, in some areas you can say the entire neighborhood is one huge mall. Look at Ginza. I think that's perhaps how Japan never really adopted the mega mall. The people, once established in a pattern, will be hard to break that one, especially when a mega mall can't give them what they already have or any better, so why bother, especially with land prices there?
 
Old 01-01-2014, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Howard County, MD
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My friend is from a Filipino family, and he says people love malls over there because of the air conditioning.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eskercurve View Post
*shrugs*

If you go outside Tokyo you can find huge malls around.

I wonder if land prices have anything to do with it? If so then Singapore is an anomaly in that regard.

And let's not forget we're talking a huge area of land and the shopping and social habits of each people are very different. And, in a sense, in some areas you can say the entire neighborhood is one huge mall. Look at Ginza. I think that's perhaps how Japan never really adopted the mega mall. The people, once established in a pattern, will be hard to break that one, especially when a mega mall can't give them what they already have or any better, so why bother, especially with land prices there?
Most malls in Singapore are at least 3 stories, often 5+, and different to a lot of malls one sees in Australia or the US which are 1 and 2 stories. The exception is some of the inner city malls here, and some others like Westfield Shoppingtown Parramatta, so there is a utilisation of space. These malls are always very busy so it's definitely always a worthwhile investment.
 
Old 01-01-2014, 09:49 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 10,823,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Most malls in Singapore are at least 3 stories, often 5+, and different to a lot of malls one sees in Australia or the US which are 1 and 2 stories. The exception is some of the inner city malls here, and some others like Westfield Shoppingtown Parramatta, so there is a utilisation of space. These malls are always very busy so it's definitely always a worthwhile investment.
Interesting. Well, in a sense, Japan does technically have a mall culture as it seems every major train station in Tokyo has a mall that you highlight, if not actually in the station, then quite close to it. Though, once you get outside Tokyo, as I mentioned, the story usually changes.
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