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Old 02-06-2014, 09:41 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,847,456 times
Reputation: 796

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
East Timorese are actually the same with the western counterpart, but its more of a Protestant in the west while the East are Catholic. They are actually pacific islanders/Melanesian rather than Austronesians or mix of both, and lots of them are Portuguesse by descent. Lots of people in the area surrounding the islands there have Portuguesse blood.
I was mainly talking about behaviour.

It is quite easy to get mixed when there are only like 500,000 population, although I think there are so many of them who looks more aborigines.

 
Old 02-06-2014, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,847,456 times
Reputation: 796
Filipino Morcon




Filipino Embutido



 
Old 02-08-2014, 03:52 AM
 
Location: Bright lights Baked Ziti
491 posts, read 1,331,722 times
Reputation: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post

What are your experiences/opinions?
My experience is different from yours after living in Makati. I wasn't as adventurous as other Americans that I worked with but did try quite a few local dishes. I love their version of lechon, another by product form the Spanish culture. There's another one that's similar to lechon that my Filipino colleague introduce me to, called crispy pata from Max's and sisig from Dencio's. Man, that stuff can give you a heart attack but that stuff is good.

For fish dishes, At LZM near Tagaytay I tried the milk fish (poisson du lait) or bangus as the locals call it. They say this fish is full of bones and can be tough to eat but LZM does a great job in serving it completely boneless. Hands down, this had to be one of my favorite fried fish Filipino dish. LZM is a hole in the wall restaurant just across the Riviera Golf club.

If you are ever in Serendra, try out ABE. Abe is one of my favorite Filipino restuarants in the Philippines. I love their steamed rice served and baked inside a hollow bamboo. Their crispy "flap" (not sure about the spelling) tilapia was really good. But, my favorite is called Sugpo aligue. It is giant prawns sauteed in crab fat. This is another heart attack meal, but man it is so good. This meal is one of those once a year meal, lol.

My favorite dessert is sans rival, again take it easy on this one too, lol. If you are ever in Greenbelt, try Razon's Halo halo, their rendition of this cold dessert is the best in my opinion. It's very simple, it doesn't mix all those beans and yam, in other words, it doesn't pile it all up. Just shaved ice, flan, and maybe a little of purple yam and milk and that's it. I heard they use water buffalo milk, but can't confirm that.

My favorite hot drink is similar to how the Columbian's in South America make it. It's another by product of their Spanish culture. It's made with this wooden spindle and mix the hot chocolate with the spindle. I saw the Columbian's make this hot chocolate in the same manner by spinning this wooden spindle by hand. Ok, thanks to google, I think it's called tsokolate de batirol. I think that's what they call the wooden spindle.
Oh man, you gotta try this chocolate drink. Once you try this, you will never wanna drink any other hot chocolate except this one. It almost has this hint of peanut butter taste to it which increases the intensity of the chocolate flavor. Hands down the best hot chocolate drink. Dang, I'm craving for this drink now, just thinking about it


As far as bread, my favorite is their pan de sal. The Filipinos eat this for breakfast but I enjoy eating it with every meal. It's a roll. I recommend only getting it at Pan de Manila caused it's baked in a hearth oven which they call pugon. You gotta buy the hot ones, they are best while hot. Man, sometimes, I just munch on them and end up eating the whole bag and they never make it home. I love this bread.
 
Old 02-08-2014, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,847,456 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tappan Zee View Post
My experience is different from yours after living in Makati. I wasn't as adventurous as other Americans that I worked with but did try quite a few local dishes. I love their version of lechon, another by product form the Spanish culture. There's another one that's similar to lechon that my Filipino colleague introduce me to, called crispy pata from Max's and sisig from Dencio's. Man, that stuff can give you a heart attack but that stuff is good.

For fish dishes, At LZM near Tagaytay I tried the milk fish (poisson du lait) or bangus as the locals call it. They say this fish is full of bones and can be tough to eat but LZM does a great job in serving it completely boneless. Hands down, this had to be one of my favorite fried fish Filipino dish. LZM is a hole in the wall restaurant just across the Riviera Golf club.

If you are ever in Serendra, try out ABE. Abe is one of my favorite Filipino restuarants in the Philippines. I love their steamed rice served and baked inside a hollow bamboo. Their crispy "flap" (not sure about the spelling) tilapia was really good. But, my favorite is called Sugpo aligue. It is giant prawns sauteed in crab fat. This is another heart attack meal, but man it is so good. This meal is one of those once a year meal, lol.

My favorite dessert is sans rival, again take it easy on this one too, lol. If you are ever in Greenbelt, try Razon's Halo halo, their rendition of this cold dessert is the best in my opinion. It's very simple, it doesn't mix all those beans and yam, in other words, it doesn't pile it all up. Just shaved ice, flan, and maybe a little of purple yam and milk and that's it. I heard they use water buffalo milk, but can't confirm that.

My favorite hot drink is similar to how the Columbian's in South America make it. It's another by product of their Spanish culture. It's made with this wooden spindle and mix the hot chocolate with the spindle. I saw the Columbian's make this hot chocolate in the same manner by spinning this wooden spindle by hand. Ok, thanks to google, I think it's called tsokolate de batirol. I think that's what they call the wooden spindle.
Oh man, you gotta try this chocolate drink. Once you try this, you will never wanna drink any other hot chocolate except this one. It almost has this hint of peanut butter taste to it which increases the intensity of the chocolate flavor. Hands down the best hot chocolate drink. Dang, I'm craving for this drink now, just thinking about it


As far as bread, my favorite is their pan de sal. The Filipinos eat this for breakfast but I enjoy eating it with every meal. It's a roll. I recommend only getting it at Pan de Manila caused it's baked in a hearth oven which they call pugon. You gotta buy the hot ones, they are best while hot. Man, sometimes, I just munch on them and end up eating the whole bag and they never make it home. I love this bread.

Thank you Tappan Zee for all your positive comments regarding Filipino food.
Yes you are right Lechon is a Spanish contribution to Filipino cuisine and I guess it is their biggest contribution as it has become the symbol of Filipino culture.
Crispy Pata is another Spanish contribution... There are also other pork dishes that are still a by product from
spanish influence Lechon Kawali ( deep fried pork belly with very crispy skin very very similar to how they do in Spain and Portugal ).

Chocolate de Batirol is what we got from Mexico during the 250 years of governance from Mexico.



Yes Bangus is really good, my husband who is not a fish lover likes it too as the Filipino bangus always tastes good because they are always marinated well and it is good that Filipinos have invented removing all the spines before cooking it. I had it once in a Chinese restaurant thinking it was boneless but afterall, it was not so we ended up not eating it since it was impossible to eat it full of spines using chopsticks.

Sans Rival should be a French cake since it has a French name but it is already so Filipino since it is always present in Filipino pastry stores.

Again, thank you Tappan Zee
 
Old 02-08-2014, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,847,456 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
correction: Well, you can "thank" the Spanish for making the Philippines' cuisine what it is today.

Imagine without having

Lechon
Caldereta
Adobo
Menudo
Mechado
Afritada
Picadillo
Callos
Cozido
Pochero
Lengua Estufada
Paella
Valenciana
Embutido
Morcon
Cardello
Crispy Pata
Lechon Kawali/Karajay
Pastel de Pollo

Leche Flan, Brazo de Mercedes, Crema de Fruta, Tocino del Cielo

Ensaimada, Empanada, Mamon, Turones, Barquillos, Polvorones, Yemas, Pastillas de Leche, Pan de Sal, Pan de Leche, Pan de Coco, Chicharon etc.

Should we be ungrateful ?

Last edited by Hermosaa; 02-08-2014 at 06:31 AM..
 
Old 02-08-2014, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,965,031 times
Reputation: 402

Another fine Filipino restaurant aside from ABE restaurant
is Laudico Bistro Filipino restaurtant

1521 Filipino Restaurant in Burgos Circle Forbes town in Bonifacio Global City


XO 46 Heritage Bistro Filipino Visayan Room
Valero St. Salcedo Village, Makati City

Last edited by pinai; 02-08-2014 at 08:28 AM..
 
Old 02-08-2014, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,965,031 times
Reputation: 402
Café Kapitan in Marikina City


Corazon Filipino Hispano Cuisine Restaurant
Shangri-La Plaza Mall


Café Via Mare Greenbelt Makati


I really like HourPhilippines TV it shows a lot of restaurant & places in the Philippines so
visit this youtube site http://www.youtube.com/user/lordancheta/videos for those who are interested

Last edited by pinai; 02-08-2014 at 09:18 AM..
 
Old 02-08-2014, 03:15 PM
 
201 posts, read 264,889 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Should we be ungrateful ?
That is your personal opinion and it does not necessarily reflect the opinion of all Filipinos. For example, another Filipino mentioned (the second post of this thread) that he/she doesn't like Filipino food except for lumpia and adobo.

As for myself, there are some Filipino foods/desserts I like and some I don't like. In general though, it seems the main Filipino dishes are salty and oily (which is not entirely unique to Filipino cuisine; for example, Chinese cuisine can be oily and greasy as well).

Since you have highlighted that Filipino cuisine is largely based on Spanish cuisine, then maybe the OP should also say that Spanish food is "lacklustre and/or bad"

------------------------------------

to the OP: One comment in the first link you provided pretty much sums it up

Quote:
you just don’t like Filipino food the way Filipinos like them and the food is not made for foreigners. It’s for the Filipinos
That and using pre-existing bias towards Malaysian, Thai, etc. cuisine to unfairly judge Filipino cuisine.
 
Old 02-08-2014, 05:22 PM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,668,250 times
Reputation: 971
My favorite Filipino dessert is silvanas, similar to sans rival. And yeah, can give you a heart attack as well (butter overload)... *sigh*

 
Old 02-08-2014, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,847,456 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
That is your personal opinion and it does not necessarily reflect the opinion of all Filipinos. For example, another Filipino mentioned (the second post of this thread) that he/she doesn't like Filipino food except for lumpia and adobo.

As for myself, there are some Filipino foods/desserts I like and some I don't like. In general though, it seems the main Filipino dishes are salty and oily (which is not entirely unique to Filipino cuisine; for example, Chinese cuisine can be oily and greasy as well).

Since you have highlighted that Filipino cuisine is largely based on Spanish cuisine, then maybe the OP should also say that Spanish food is "lacklustre and/or bad"

------------------------------------

to the OP: One comment in the first link you provided pretty much sums it up


That and using pre-existing bias towards Malaysian, Thai, etc. cuisine to unfairly judge Filipino cuisine.
I am sure for Filipinos " Born and Raised " in the Philippines, they all love the foods I mentioned since they " GREW up" eating those foods and most of the people in the Philippines hasn't really eaten foods other than Filipino cuisine.

Pan de Sal is very staple in every Filipino table in the Philippines every morning and merienda.

I don't think Filipino is as oily as Chinese. We might have some fried fish and chicken and Bulalo/ Pata soup but most of the stews and noodles are not floating in oil unlike Chinese food.
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