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Old 02-09-2014, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,867,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
My favorite Filipino dessert is silvanas, similar to sans rival. And yeah, can give you a heart attack as well (butter overload)... *sigh*
I love Silvanas too

 
Old 02-09-2014, 01:04 PM
 
163 posts, read 200,000 times
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"I am sure for Filipinos " Born and Raised " in the Philippines, they all love the foods I mentioned since they " GREW up" eating those foods and most of the people in the Philippines hasn't really eaten foods other than Filipino cuisine. "

This is the most ridiculous assumption I've ever read. I've explored more cuisines than most of the locals, American-born and raised locals of the Bay Area.

Filipino cuisine, just as with most other cuisines is a reflection of the colonizers cuisine - of course tailored to the local conditions. Flavors are strong, but not as "complex" as cuisines of neighboring southeast asian nations. Predominant flavor profiles: salty & sour. Predominant proteins: pork and fish.

Neighboring nations use a lot of "spices" such as curry (mix), cardamom and turmeric. These spices are hardly (if not at all) used in Filipino cuisine. Again, attribute that to History. Filipino cuisine uses a lot of salt, pepper, garlic, vinegar and fish sauce.

"Lack lustre" is highly subjective. Growing up eating variations of Asian Food, Italian food, etc - - I find American food lacklustre and lacking character (I only really like southern/creole).
 
Old 02-12-2014, 07:16 PM
 
Location: US of A
13 posts, read 18,650 times
Reputation: 24
Our diet is meat .Adobo,Pinakbet and Fish everything serves with rice This is probably why we don’t excessively get fat. Most of us have good metabolism that no matter how many cupful of rice or meats we eat.

Anyways here are the best Restaurants in manila Area...

El Cirkulo

"El Cirkulo" first opened in 1995; Chef J. Gamboa serves contemporary Spanish cuisine in Manila; some of his signature dishes include "slow roasted U.S. beef belly with horseradish cream...
"El Cirkulo" first opened in 1995; Chef J. Gamboa serves contemporary Spanish cuisine in Manila; some of his signature dishes include "slow roasted U.S. beef belly with horseradish cream sauce" and "Paella montana with portabella mushrooms"; Chef Gamboa is constantly adding new dishes to his menu leaving his customers excited with anticipation


Style: Awesome Spanish Cuisine
Area: Makati

Inagiku

"Inagiku", located in the Makati Shangri-la Hotel, you’ll experience some of the world class Japanese cuisine; Master Sushi Chef, Wataru Hikawa, prepares some of the most exotic Japanese...
"Inagiku", located in the Makati Shangri-la Hotel, you’ll experience some of the world class Japanese cuisine; Master Sushi Chef, Wataru Hikawa, prepares some of the most exotic Japanese dishes that you’ll ever find; this restaurant is definitely a keeper, even though it’s on the pricier side, the food is well worth it; alternatively for a fresh Japanese lunch try "Serina" (Makati Cinema Sq, Manila, Philippines); prices are reasonable and your appetite will definitely be satisfied


Style: Japanese at the Shangri-La
Area: Makati

Milky Way

"Milky Way" is an awesome Filipino restaurant serving homestyle cuisine at a reasonable price; you have the option of dining in or take out; the "crispy hito" and "ensaladang...
"Milky Way" is an awesome Filipino restaurant serving homestyle cuisine at a reasonable price; you have the option of dining in or take out; the "crispy hito" and "ensaladang mustasa" will make you want to go back for more

Style: Filipino Cuisine On The Go
Area: Makati





Sala Bistro - Sala Bistro Manila - all info, facts & ratesSala Bistro


"Sala Bistro " is an elegant restaurant serving modern European cuisine; it is the best burger in town with a side of truffle mashed potatoes; have the butterscotch pudding for dessert simply...
"Sala Bistro " is an elegant restaurant serving modern European cuisine; it is the best burger in town with a side of truffle mashed potatoes; have the butterscotch pudding for dessert simply irresistable!


Style: Continental Food In A Hip Setting
Area: Makati

And Congo Grille Bar And Restaurant

Or we have KFC Fried Chicken served with rice. We have Fridays, Burger King, and Kenny Rogers. Jollibee and Mc donalds if you want Humburgers.










 
Old 02-17-2014, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,305,510 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by BroadwayDiva View Post
"I am sure for Filipinos " Born and Raised " in the Philippines, they all love the foods I mentioned since they " GREW up" eating those foods and most of the people in the Philippines hasn't really eaten foods other than Filipino cuisine. "

This is the most ridiculous assumption I've ever read. I've explored more cuisines than most of the locals, American-born and raised locals of the Bay Area.

Filipino cuisine, just as with most other cuisines is a reflection of the colonizers cuisine - of course tailored to the local conditions. Flavors are strong, but not as "complex" as cuisines of neighboring southeast asian nations. Predominant flavor profiles: salty & sour. Predominant proteins: pork and fish.

Neighboring nations use a lot of "spices" such as curry (mix), cardamom and turmeric. These spices are hardly (if not at all) used in Filipino cuisine. Again, attribute that to History. Filipino cuisine uses a lot of salt, pepper, garlic, vinegar and fish sauce.

"Lack lustre" is highly subjective. Growing up eating variations of Asian Food, Italian food, etc - - I find American food lacklustre and lacking character (I only really like southern/creole).
Hmmm, most Asian cuisine didn't seem that influenced by the coloniser's cuisine. Like you don't see Indians having roast dinners...I mean there is some influence, like baguettes in Vietnam, the odd fish'n'chip shop in Singapore or Malaysia at hawker stalls, well and of course western food too, but in general the food in Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, India.etc seems pretty local/Asian without much European influence.
 
Old 02-17-2014, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,867,818 times
Reputation: 797
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Hmmm, most Asian cuisine didn't seem that influenced by the coloniser's cuisine. Like you don't see Indians having roast dinners...I mean there is some influence, like baguettes in Vietnam, the odd fish'n'chip shop in Singapore or Malaysia at hawker stalls, well and of course western food too, but in general the food in Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, India.etc seems pretty local/Asian without much European influence.
I think it had something to do with how influential the colonisers were. I think Spain was really very influential and the most influential among all the European colonisers as the Spanish were really able to propagate Catholicism in all of their colonies and almost all of their colonies share the same culture, Philippines is in Asia but still shares similar culture with Latin America. I don't think Brasilians are similar in culture to Macanese or Moroccan to Vietnamese.

Last edited by Hermosaa; 02-17-2014 at 06:25 PM..
 
Old 02-17-2014, 05:47 PM
 
35,324 posts, read 25,297,462 times
Reputation: 32421
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Hmmm, most Asian cuisine didn't seem that influenced by the coloniser's cuisine. Like you don't see Indians having roast dinners...I mean there is some influence, like baguettes in Vietnam, the odd fish'n'chip shop in Singapore or Malaysia at hawker stalls, well and of course western food too, but in general the food in Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, India.etc seems pretty local/Asian without much European influence.

The french influence on baking in Cambodia is rather strong.
 
Old 02-17-2014, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,305,510 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
I think it had something to do with how influential the colonisers were. I think Spain was really very influential and the most influential among all the European colonisers as the Spanish were really able to propagate Catholicism in all of their colonies and almost all of their colonies share the same culture, Philippines is in Asia but still shares similar culture with Latin America. I don't think Brasilians are similar in culture to Macanese or Moroccan to Vietnamese.
How come the Spanish influence in the Philippines was so much more pervasive, I wonder. I mean they didn't settle in large numbers like in Latin America. Might it have something to do with Spanish colonial policies?
 
Old 02-17-2014, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,305,510 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
The french influence on baking in Cambodia is rather strong.
Well like I said there's some influence but Cambodian food is more or less Asian, with Asian ingredients, cooking techniques, recipes.etc. Banh mi is actually an example of a fusion food, as it is made with I believe a mixture of wheat and rice flour giving it it's distinctive crispy texture. It's not too surprising as the European elite generally just lived among themselves segregated from the populace. Macau has a few examples, like pork chop bun, Portuguese egg tarts and milk pudding.

Last edited by The Postman; 02-17-2014 at 07:50 PM..
 
Old 02-17-2014, 07:49 PM
 
1,102 posts, read 1,677,454 times
Reputation: 972
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
How come the Spanish influence in the Philippines was so much more pervasive, I wonder. I mean they didn't settle in large numbers like in Latin America. Might it have something to do with Spanish colonial policies?
It's because the Philippines was a Spanish colony for 300+ years. Malacca and Singapore were part of the British Empire for like maybe 150 years (?), while other parts of Malaysia were part of the British Empire for less than 100 years, or in the case of Sabah and Sarawak, maybe less than 50 years. Vietnam was a French colony for 50 to 60 years, but there's already some French influence in their food. The British are kind of an exemption though when it comes to food from the colonizers. British cuisine is even more lackluster. I actually haven't been to a "British" restaurant. Does any fish and chips restaurant count as British?
 
Old 02-17-2014, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,305,510 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
It's because the Philippines was a Spanish colony for 300+ years. Malacca and Singapore were part of the British Empire for like maybe 150 years (?), while other parts of Malaysia were part of the British Empire for less than 100 years, or in the case of Sabah and Sarawak, maybe less than 50 years. Vietnam was a French colony for 50 to 60 years, but there's already some French influence in their food. The British are kind of an exemption though when it comes to food from the colonizers. British cuisine is even more lackluster. I actually haven't been to a "British" restaurant. Does any fish and chips restaurant count as British?
Hmmm, but Indonesia was a colony for a long time too, and the British started settling India over 300 years ago actually. Macau too. How many Spanish people actually went to the Philippines? Must've been a lot.

Vietnam was from about 1880 to 1954. Mostly just baguettes...they eat snails too but I think they do in Asia anyway.

I guess it would be British food. There is the odd 'British restaurant' here but yeah it's not usually thought of as much of a 'cuisine'.
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