U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 02-18-2014, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,238,353 times
Reputation: 2833

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
British food is quite bland...lacks salt and pepper
Lacks salt? I'd say on the opposite, its often so bland that they rely on salt for seasoning lol...kinda like Filipino food. Hearty comfort food but the flavours are not complex.

 
Old 02-18-2014, 06:22 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,668,647 times
Reputation: 971
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I wouldn't say that, British cuisine is/has been pretty influential actually. 'Australian' cuisine is pretty British based.
So what is Australian cuisine? I haven't been to Australia, but I guess no one travels to Australia for the food? I've tried kangaroo jerky and vegemite, both of which I rate as lackluster and/or bad...
 
Old 02-18-2014, 06:26 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,668,647 times
Reputation: 971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
British food is quite bland...lacks salt and pepper
That's probably why they always have those salt and pepper shakers. It's the diner's job to season the dish to taste. I would much rather prefer the chef does that job.
 
Old 02-18-2014, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,238,353 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
So what is Australian cuisine? I haven't been to Australia, but I guess no one travels to Australia for the food? I've tried kangaroo jerky and vegemite, both of which I rate as lackluster and/or bad...
There's 'bush tucker' like various plants/fruits/roots and animal products which people have eaten here for thousands of years, and then stuff like meat pies, fish'n'chips, damper...which is hardly original. There are a few things like Lamingtons, Pavlova we like to claim as our own, or even Vegemite which is just like Marmite...But in terms of the culinary scene, because of being so multicultural and having great produce we have some of the best chefs and best dining scenes in the world.
 
Old 02-18-2014, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,848,433 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Lacks salt? I'd say on the opposite, its often so bland that they rely on salt for seasoning lol...kinda like Filipino food. Hearty comfort food but the flavours are not complex.
Yes lacks salt. Every time I had Sunday roast when I was in the UK, I always want to add salt. Same with Fish and chips.
 
Old 02-18-2014, 06:38 AM
 
Location: West Jakarta + Tangerang
376 posts, read 742,812 times
Reputation: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
Not sure what Indonesia got from the Dutch, but Dutch cuisine is not exactly outstanding either. I think the Philippines absorbed more of its colonizer's influence compared to the neighboring countries because the Spaniards actually imposed their religion, and in that sense, tried to impose a different way of life from what was present. Religion dictates a lot of what one can eat and should not eat. For a long time, the Philippines also followed the Catholic tradition of no meat on Fridays. Also, there was not a strong presence of a unified culture when the Spaniards arrived. In contrast, Macau has very influential Chinese culture and cuisine. Indonesia had some old kingdoms/empires in Java and Sumatra, and most parts of mainland Asia already belonged to empires/kingdoms of various sizes (at least all of which were larger than whatever was present in pre-Hispanic Philippines).

There weren't that many Spanish colonizers who went to the Philippines. A lot who went were also Spanish priests. There are some Filipinos who had Spanish priests in their ancestry anyway, but it would be much more if they weren't supposed to be celibate.

Vietnam's French influence may not be huge, but Vietnam had a well-established culture/cuisine by the time the French arrived, and the time was not very long. I will consider any time after onset of World War II and when any revolution against the colonizers to be not as influential already, if at all.
#139 Roti+Meses+Mentega, Makanan Langka di Dunia | KOMPETIBLOG 2013
I know the Dutch have given some very significant influence in Indonesia ^ ^
 
Old 02-18-2014, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,238,353 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Yes lacks salt. Every time I had Sunday roast when I was in the UK, I always want to add salt. Same with Fish and chips.
Well that is pretty easy to fix. Just shake some salt on it. Food that is otherwise poorly flavoured, though, is harder to fix.

Maybe your tastebuds are still too Filipino. Very salty.
 
Old 02-18-2014, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,848,433 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well that is pretty easy to fix. Just shake some salt on it. Food that is otherwise poorly flavoured, though, is harder to fix.

Maybe your tastebuds are still too Filipino. Very salty.
Portuguese food isn't that salty either but some of them also thinks British food lacks salt and pepper.
 
Old 02-18-2014, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,238,353 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Portuguese food isn't that salty either but some of them also thinks British food lacks salt and pepper.
Some Spanish and Portuguese food seems to have spices and chilli, like paella and peri-peri chicken, too.
 
Old 02-18-2014, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,848,433 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Some Spanish and Portuguese food seems to have spices and chilli, like paella and peri-peri chicken, too.
Paella isn't spicy at all. Frango com Piri Piri ( spicy chicken ) is.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top