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Old 02-03-2014, 12:41 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
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i must say breadtalk is all over Asia now, they are almost everywhere in Indonesia.... its only ok for few first try then afterwards i am so sick of it

 
Old 02-03-2014, 12:42 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr bolo View Post
seems like a lot of the foods are almost unrecognizable , mostly stewed dishes all chopped into small pieces in gravy / sauce

the dish the Postman tried sounds like it could of been Dinuguan? pork inards cooked in pig's blood with dark sauce like a stew, the dish they tell the kids it's chocolate meat

mostly served cafeteria style like they serve food in the army
Yes Filipino food is mostly " Stews or Estufado ". We have 5 stews that were all influenced by Spain and Mexico. Filipino food unlike other Asian food use a lot of Tomato sauce in stews, something we got again from Spain.

Caldereta
Menudo
Mechado
Afritada
Callos

And we have minced beef cooked in tomato sauce, potatoes, Carrots, Green Olives, Raisins. It's called Picadillo and very similar to Picadillo/ Arroz a la Cubana in Cuba and all Hispanic nations.

I am surprised you know about Dinuguan. It is really an authentic Filipino food. It's my favourite.

Last edited by Hermosaa; 02-03-2014 at 01:31 AM..
 
Old 02-03-2014, 01:28 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,235,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
I agree that Filipino food is a bit lackluster, but it's not as bad as what the OP stated.

There are two things that Anthony Bourdain liked re Filipino food, one is lechon and the other one is halo-halo. Lechon is not readily available overseas. Halo-halo is similar to the Malaysian ice kacang. I don't exactly agree that desserts from Malaysia/Singapore are better. As much as I like Malaysian/Singaporean food, I haven't had any outstanding desserts that I can recall.

Pork barbecue, chicken barbecue and roasted chicken are cooked in charcoal, and similar to lechon, are not readily available overseas. Filipinos tend to adapt to other cultures easily, and few who went abroad are good cooks when they were in the Philippines anyway, so that explains the low number of restaurants abroad.

Also, Jollibee is not representative of Filipino food. It's a fast food chain. It's not even thought of as "Filipino food" within the Philippines. Their biggest seller is fried chicken. It's not that bad, but if the OP sampled it in the US where they use American chickens that grow as big as turkeys, it tastes awful. The Jollibee in the US also have pancit palabok that has very thick noodles. Also taste worse than what is available in the Philippines. Filipino style spaghetti tastes as bad overseas as in the Philippines though.

Maybe due to more outside influences, I would say Filipinos go and eat at restaurants of other cuisines more often than people from other countries. In China, it's normal to eat at Chinese restaurants maybe 80% of the time, while in the Philippines, when people go out to eat, it's probably like only 20 to 30% to "Filipino" restaurants. Just go to a shopping mall and count how many "Filipino" restaurants are there and most likely less than a third. There are probably as many Chinese restaurants, a lot of fast food, some Western fine dining places, and quite a number of Japanese/Korean restaurants too.
Come to Singapore/Malaysia and I will show you. You might just not have known where to find good stuff. Ice kacang (endless variety), cendol, colourful kueh (I love the kueh dada myself, pandan flavoured green crepes with a filling of coconut and caramelised sugar), kueh lapis (layer cake), gula melaka, shaved ice, custard tarts (yes a Portuguese/Macanese thing but also popular in Singapore), various flaky pastries with various sweet fillings, various Malay/Indian sweets and candies, durian ice cream and durian cake (if you like durian), pulut hitam, mango pudding, mango and sticky rice (also Thai). Seriously, come to Lau Pa Sat or something in Singapore and you will be overwhelmed...plus all the tropical fruits.etc which are delicious in themselves. No other Asian cuisine can hold a candle to the sheer array and deliciousness of sweets that you find over there. The range of more western style sweets, cakes and pastries in Singapore is also fairly impressive. Also a lot of desserts from Taiwanese/Hong Kong. Eating dessert is just as fun as eating savoury meals there.

Last edited by The Postman; 02-03-2014 at 01:39 AM..
 
Old 02-03-2014, 01:35 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Come to Singapore/Malaysia and I will show you. You might just not have known where to find good stuff. Ice kacang (endless variety), cendol, colourful kueh (I love the kueh dada myself, pandan flavoured green crepes with a filling of coconut and caramelised sugar), kueh lapis (layer cake), gula melaka, shaved ice, custard tarts (yes a Portuguese/Macanese thing but also popular in Singapore), various Malay/Indian sweets and candies, durian ice cream and durian cake (if you like durian), pulut hitam, mango pudding, mango and sticky rice (also Thai). Seriously, come to Lau Pa Sat or something in Singapore and you will be overwhelmed...plus all the tropical fruits.etc which are delicious in themselves. No other Asian cuisine can hold a candle to the sheer array and deliciousness of sweets that you find over there. The range of more western style sweets, cakes and pastries in Singapore is also fairly impressive. Also a lot of desserts from Taiwanese/Hong Kong. Eating dessert is just as fun as eating savoury meals there.
Chinese aren't really so known for having desserts are they ? When I go to Chinese restaurants, I still always have to go to Western pastry stores to have my dessert.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 01:41 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Chinese aren't really so known for having desserts are they ? When I go to Chinese restaurants, I still always have to go to Western pastry stores to have my dessert.
Well I'm talking about Singapore/Malaysia, not China, the desserts are a mix of all different influences. The food in Malaysia is totally unique.

Yes, in a lot of Chinese restaurants dessert is mostly fresh fruit (which is healthy I guess, but I know what you mean, sometimes I crave something a lot sweeter/richer). I'm not sure if you like Taiwanese/HK style dessert places, I'm not as big a fan of sweet potato or taro pieces, I've had the fungus in sweet soup with wolfberries (fungus sounds bad but it actually doesn't taste like much). Of course there are the famous shaved ice, I love the mango shaved ice, things like mango or pomelo with coconut milk and mochi...a lot of these places also have pearl/bubble tea. These are common in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore.

Let's just say the range (and usually quality) of sweets you can find in Singapore is much much superior to most of China and indeed probably anywhere in Asia. For instance you might see kueh like things in Vietnam, but from what I've had, it simply does not compare to our kuih/kueh in taste. Kueh was originally a Malay/Peranakan-Straits Chinese thing.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 01:43 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Kueh Dadar ( Sweet Nonya Pancake Roll) recipe

Kueh dada, a delicious delicacies enjoyed by Malaysians and Singaporeans. The crepe has a fragrant flavour, is slightly sweet, while the inside is joyously sweet with a nice texture...anything with gula melaka (really just like palm sugar) is also delicious, and rosewater, as is found in Ice kacang and Bandung, a Malay-Indian drink of condensed milk with rosewater syrup (pink colour).
 
Old 02-03-2014, 01:57 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,847,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well I'm talking about Singapore/Malaysia, not China, the desserts are a mix of all different influences. The food in Malaysia is totally unique.

Yes, in a lot of Chinese restaurants dessert is mostly fresh fruit (which is healthy I guess, but I know what you mean, sometimes I crave something a lot sweeter/richer). I'm not sure if you like Taiwanese/HK style dessert places, I'm not as big a fan of sweet potato or taro pieces, I've had the fungus in sweet soup with wolfberries (fungus sounds bad but it actually doesn't taste like much). Of course there are the famous shaved ice, I love the mango shaved ice, things like mango or pomelo with coconut milk and mochi...a lot of these places also have pearl/bubble tea. These are common in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore.

Let's just say the range (and usually quality) of sweets you can find in Singapore is much much superior to most of China and indeed probably anywhere in Asia. For instance you might see kueh like things in Vietnam, but from what I've had, it simply does not compare to our kuih/kueh in taste. Kueh was originally a Malay/Peranakan-Straits Chinese thing.
I am not really a fan of Asian desserts. I prefer western desserts like Flan de Leche , rich chocolate ganache cake, Tres Leches cake, Fudge, Sex in a Pan, Floating Island etc.

Philippines has a lot of Western desserts as well especially now with the presence of many Cafes.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,235,411 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
I am not really a fan of Asian desserts. I prefer western desserts like Flan de Leche , rich chocolate ganache cake, Tres Leches cake, Fudge, Sex in a Pan, Floating Island etc.

Philippines has a lot of Western desserts as well especially now with the presence of many Cafes.
Singapore does too. There are French bakeries which some delicious French pastries. I think this combination of both the best of east and west makes Singapore one of the greatest cities in the world for foodies. It's a benefit of globalisation. All in all Singapore is more global and international than Manila. Singapore's GDP alone is more than the Philippines, a nation of 90 million:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...y_GDP_(nominal)

Singapore was the second most visited city in the world in 2012:

Euromonitor Report: Hong Kong Is the World


I see a lot more foreigners now than I used to.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 02:07 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,668,250 times
Reputation: 971
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Come to Singapore/Malaysia and I will show you. You might just not have known where to find good stuff. Ice kacang (endless variety), cendol, colourful kueh (I love the kueh dada myself, pandan flavoured green crepes with a filling of coconut and caramelised sugar), kueh lapis (layer cake), gula melaka, shaved ice, custard tarts (yes a Portuguese/Macanese thing but also popular in Singapore), various flaky pastries with various sweet fillings, various Malay/Indian sweets and candies, durian ice cream and durian cake (if you like durian), pulut hitam, mango pudding, mango and sticky rice (also Thai). Seriously, come to Lau Pa Sat or something in Singapore and you will be overwhelmed...plus all the tropical fruits.etc which are delicious in themselves. No other Asian cuisine can hold a candle to the sheer array and deliciousness of sweets that you find over there. The range of more western style sweets, cakes and pastries in Singapore is also fairly impressive. Also a lot of desserts from Taiwanese/Hong Kong. Eating dessert is just as fun as eating savoury meals there.
Thanks! The Philippines has versions of a lot of those too. Like layered cake is called sapin-sapin and you can easily get durian ice cream and candies. However, am not a fan of Asian desserts, most of which are based on sticky rice, tapioca or coconut. Yeah, I like those Macanese egg tarts. It sounds like Lau Pa Sat is similar to Hong Kong's Hui Lau Shan. Not a huge fan as well. I would rather just eat Western desserts, cheesecakes and chocolate truffle cakes. If nothing else is available, would rather get the Haagen-Dazs or Magnum ice cream :-)

Anyway, I may go to Kuching later this month. Anything you can recommend there?
 
Old 02-03-2014, 02:16 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,235,411 times
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I should also mention the cookies! Bengawan Solo is a great place to sample them, there are two outlets at Changi airport. The pineapple tarts, layer cake, pandan cake, currant and almond cookies are some the delights you can try there.
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