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Old 02-22-2014, 02:54 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,668,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Hainanese chicken rice was invented in Singapore...you might be thinking of Wenchang chicken, which is not the same, the rice is not flavoured. Lechon is not unique to the Philippines...it's like some Filipinos claiming creme brulee or paella as 'Filipino' haha.
If you represent Singapore, I pity the other Singaporeans whose reputation has been damaged by your ignorance and arrogance. What makes you think that the Filipino version of lechon is exactly the same as that of the other countries? The ingredients and other cooking techniques are all different, except for the pig and the charcoal.

The name Hainanese Chicken Rice alone means that whoever invented it and named it still acknowledge that its origins is Hainanese, despite the minor addition of some flavors to the rice. Aren't a lot of the world's dishes a variant of some other things in other places anyway?

To answer the post in your original question, it is bad and lackluster because your logic goes like this:
* Lechon -- not tried, but has excellent reputation ... other not so popular or tasty variants found in other countries... rejected as not Filipino despite being most popular in the Philippines and a national symbol
* Jollibee -- tried, not good ... became standard as Filipino food because it is not good, even if it is hamburgers and fried chicken (originally American)
* Magnolia ice cream -- tried, excellent ... the ones sold in Singapore is licensed from the Philippines ... ignored as having any connection with the Philippines and just embraced as Singaporean
* Other Filipino food -- not tried, rejected for visually unappealing due to the brown sauce, subconsciously rejected for being Filipino. Not sure what color you want your food sauce? Pink?

With logic like that, do not know what explanation to give you. Maybe time to close the thread!

 
Old 02-22-2014, 03:23 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,001,496 times
Reputation: 1798
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Yes but it originated in Europe and was just imported into the PI. It wasn't created in the Philippines.

TONS of dishes were created in Singapore/Malaysia. Which is why it's a bit misleading when people talk about 'Chinese, Malay and Indian' food there. Yes, it's true you have a few things that were imported from China or India, fish ball soup or something, but you have tons of dishes which are a genuine fusion of different influences and new innovations.
well a lot of our food came from somewhere else but was adapted in the Philippines.

Adobo is one of the popular Filipino dishes that originated in the Philippines. The Spanish just named it adobo but it's not the same. You'll also find the same dish in Guam, but they call it Estufao. I think it was brought to Guam from the Philippines
 
Old 02-22-2014, 03:29 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,848,433 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Hainanese chicken rice was invented in Singapore...you might be thinking of Wenchang chicken, which is not the same, the rice is not flavoured. Lechon is not unique to the Philippines...it's like some Filipinos claiming creme brulee or paella as 'Filipino' haha.
We do not have Creme Brulee in the Philippines, we have Flan de Leche/ Leche Flan. Yes, it was Madre Espana that introduced it to us, but it has been part of the Filipino culture for maybe 500 years so it has become " Filipino " to us that it is present in all Filipino parties and also prepared in homes and not just prepared in restaurants and cafes. I make it every Saturday except for today as I am making Cuatro Leches.
We never proclaimed Paella as ours. We always acknowledge the generosity of the Spanish for having shared with us their national food.
 
Old 02-22-2014, 03:39 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,001,496 times
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its like saying Lumpia isnt a Filipino food just because there are spring rolls all over Asia. Lumpia is probably the first thing that comes to mind when Americans think of Filipino food
 
Old 02-22-2014, 04:09 AM
 
Location: singapore
1,526 posts, read 1,271,551 times
Reputation: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
If you represent Singapore, I pity the other Singaporeans whose reputation has been damaged by your ignorance and arrogance. What makes you think that the Filipino version of lechon is exactly the same as that of the other countries? The ingredients and other cooking techniques are all different, except for the pig and the charcoal.

The name Hainanese Chicken Rice alone means that whoever invented it and named it still acknowledge that its origins is Hainanese, despite the minor addition of some flavors to the rice. Aren't a lot of the world's dishes a variant of some other things in other places anyway?


With logic like that, do not know what explanation to give you. Maybe time to close the thread!
Aiyo.. Why so serious ??
 
Old 02-22-2014, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,238,353 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
If you represent Singapore, I pity the other Singaporeans whose reputation has been damaged by your ignorance and arrogance. What makes you think that the Filipino version of lechon is exactly the same as that of the other countries? The ingredients and other cooking techniques are all different, except for the pig and the charcoal.

The name Hainanese Chicken Rice alone means that whoever invented it and named it still acknowledge that its origins is Hainanese, despite the minor addition of some flavors to the rice. Aren't a lot of the world's dishes a variant of some other things in other places anyway?

To answer the post in your original question, it is bad and lackluster because your logic goes like this:
* Lechon -- not tried, but has excellent reputation ... other not so popular or tasty variants found in other countries... rejected as not Filipino despite being most popular in the Philippines and a national symbol
* Jollibee -- tried, not good ... became standard as Filipino food because it is not good, even if it is hamburgers and fried chicken (originally American)
* Magnolia ice cream -- tried, excellent ... the ones sold in Singapore is licensed from the Philippines ... ignored as having any connection with the Philippines and just embraced as Singaporean
* Other Filipino food -- not tried, rejected for visually unappealing due to the brown sauce, subconsciously rejected for being Filipino. Not sure what color you want your food sauce? Pink?

With logic like that, do not know what explanation to give you. Maybe time to close the thread!
I talk about Singapore a lot but I don't claim to represent it...it's because of my family connections. I'm still Australian.

Well if you know anything about Hainanese chicken rice, it's called that because it was invented by Hainanese chefs in SINGAPORE.

Well I'm more referring to people's opinions, which are generally negative...maybe there is good Filipino cuisine, but it seems to depend more on the cook, Anthony Bourdain seemed to like some of the stuff he had, but in general, I'm asking why it hasn't gained popularity and seems lacklustre.

I still said I'd try, but it just doesn't really jump out at me to try it.
 
Old 02-22-2014, 06:31 AM
 
6,993 posts, read 9,538,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
but in general, I'm asking why it hasn't gained popularity and seems lacklustre.
Filipino lechon is nearly impossible to cook without using Philippine native pig. They will never accomplish the the thin crispy skin with an equally thin layer of melt in your mouth fat and meat using commercialized Smithfield pigs or even Berkshire pork. Most of the lechons and suckling pigs I have eaten outside the Philippines have skins that are too thick and not as crunchy with too much fat protruding. The Spaniards get around this by using piglets, but not with grown pigs.

The rest of Filipino cuisine has gained popularity outside the country. Here in the US, it is popular among the young artistic hipster crowd particularly pork bar-b-cue, shrimp sinigang, tocino, sisig and kare kare. Also Pampangueno food which is ironically not popular among Filipinos in the Philippines. The ones who don't eat Filipino food in large numbers are in the older, less dynamic suburban demographic who prefer Chinese take out and PF Chang's. They do, however, like home cooked adobo and sinigang.
 
Old 02-22-2014, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,848,433 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Forest_Hills_Daddy View Post
Filipino lechon is nearly impossible to cook without using Philippine native pig. They will never accomplish the the thin crispy skin with an equally thin layer of melt in your mouth fat and meat using commercialized Smithfield pigs or even Berkshire pork. Most of the lechons and suckling pigs I have eaten outside the Philippines have skins that are too thick and not as crunchy with too much fat protruding. The Spaniards get around this by using piglets, but not with grown pigs.

The rest of Filipino cuisine has gained popularity outside the country. Here in the US, it is popular among the young artistic hipster crowd particularly pork bar-b-cue, shrimp sinigang, tocino, sisig and kare kare. Also Pampangueno food which is ironically not popular among Filipinos in the Philippines. The ones who don't eat Filipino food in large numbers are in the older, less dynamic suburban demographic who prefer Chinese take out and PF Chang's. They do, however, like home cooked adobo and sinigang.
I agree about the difference in taste and crispiness. I had Lechon in Portugal before and the pig was totally roasted as in black but it wasn't so crispy and the skin was thick.
 
Old 02-22-2014, 07:00 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,001,496 times
Reputation: 1798
I almost broke my teeth trying to eat some lechon here in the states. Too thick

Last edited by Smtchll; 02-22-2014 at 07:15 AM..
 
Old 02-22-2014, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Poshawa, Ontario
2,986 posts, read 3,320,081 times
Reputation: 5622
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
What are your experiences/opinions?
Having Filipino family members, I disagree with your statement wholeheartedly. I have had several Filipino dishes and they were all very good. Perhaps the ones you tried were made by bad cooks.

Now, if your post was describing authentic Chinese food, I would agree 100%. I have tried it a few times and have never been impressed. A Chinese co-worker raved about one specific restaurant and asked us to try it. We all chipped in and got 10 different dishes. All of them were bland, heavy on organ meats and very similar in taste. Needless to say, there were a lot of leftovers. Give me chop suey, soo gai and chicken balls over that crap any day!
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