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Old 02-03-2014, 02:18 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,231,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
Thanks! The Philippines has versions of a lot of those too. Like layered cake is called sapin-sapin and you can easily get durian ice cream and candies. However, am not a fan of Asian desserts, most of which are based on sticky rice, tapioca or coconut. Yeah, I like those Macanese egg tarts. It sounds like Lau Pa Sat is similar to Hong Kong's Hui Lau Shan. Not a huge fan as well. I would rather just eat Western desserts, cheesecakes and chocolate truffle cakes. If nothing else is available, would rather get the Haagen-Dazs or Magnum ice cream :-)

Anyway, I may go to Kuching later this month. Anything you can recommend there?
Yes, S'pore has all of those too of course, Haagen-Daz, Movepick, Ben and Jerry's, Coldstone, Baskin Robbin's.etc.

Interesting, maybe it's the pan Malay influence?

So you don't like kuih lapis? Pity because there's a store there that sells tons of varieties of lapis.

Kuching laksa is a well known local dish. Plus they have often serve rice in these tall cones, like their nasi goreng or fried rice, I don't know if it's a Sarawak thing.

Do not hesitate to explore around Kuching. Bako national park is a must-see, as well as the orang utan sanctuary, and the various native villages.

 
Old 02-03-2014, 04:20 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,846,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Singapore does too. There are French bakeries which some delicious French pastries. I think this combination of both the best of east and west makes Singapore one of the greatest cities in the world for foodies. It's a benefit of globalisation. All in all Singapore is more global and international than Manila. Singapore's GDP alone is more than the Philippines, a nation of 90 million:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...y_GDP_(nominal)

Singapore was the second most visited city in the world in 2012:

Euromonitor Report: Hong Kong Is the World


I see a lot more foreigners now than I used to.
Singapore may be more global of course since it is one of the most important countries in Asia but Filipino lifestyle has been westernised for sooo long already. Western desserts and cakes are not just made and eaten in Pastry houses but in homes. Baking cakes and pastries in homes has been practised for so long already especially during Fiestas. Flan de Leche, a Spanish influenced dessert and has become like a symbol of Filipino dessert has been around for a long long time already as Philippines became independent from Spain for over a hundred years already.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 04:26 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Singapore may be more global of course since it is one of the most important countries in Asia but Filipino lifestyle has been westernised for sooo long already. Western desserts and cakes are not just made and eaten in Pastry houses but in homes. Baking cakes and pastries in homes has been practised for so long already especially during Fiestas. Flan de Leche, a Spanish influenced dessert and has become like a symbol of Filipino dessert has been around for a long long time already as Philippines became independent from Spain for over a hundred years already.
Likewise Portuguese egg tart (Pastel de nata) and milk pudding have been a staple in Macau for a long time as well. Many Singaporeans also eat a lot of western style pastries at home. Curry puffs are also very similar to empanadas.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 04:33 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I should also mention the cookies! Bengawan Solo is a great place to sample them, there are two outlets at Changi airport. The pineapple tarts, layer cake, pandan cake, currant and almond cookies are some the delights you can try there.
Sounds very Indonesians, except the current and almond cookies.. and the name "Bengawan Solo" - Solo or Surakarta is a city in Java
 
Old 02-03-2014, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Singapore may be more global of course since it is one of the most important countries in Asia but Filipino lifestyle has been westernised for sooo long already. Western desserts and cakes are not just made and eaten in Pastry houses but in homes. Baking cakes and pastries in homes has been practised for so long already especially during Fiestas. Flan de Leche, a Spanish influenced dessert and has become like a symbol of Filipino dessert has been around for a long long time already as Philippines became independent from Spain for over a hundred years already.
Though I think most people associate creme caramel with France, maybe in the Philippines, but no one else thinks of it as Filipino cuisine.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
Sounds very Indonesians, except the current and almond cookies.. and the name "Bengawan Solo" - Solo or Surakarta is a city in Java
Well yes, Indonesia and Malaysia are very similar culturally, Malay culture has most in common with Sumatra. We share many dishes, like rendang, otak otak, a lot of fried fish, ikan bilis, satay, a lot of peanuts, coconut rice, sambal and rice (a lot of things with fried egg, nasi lemak combines all of this), nasi goreng, kueh lapis, same style of kari ayam/curry chicken.etc.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 04:39 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,667,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Likewise Portuguese egg tart (Pastel de nata) and milk pudding have been a staple in Macau for a long time as well. Many Singaporeans also eat a lot of western style pastries at home. Curry puffs are also very similar to empanadas.
There are a few Lord Stow's stores in Manila where you can get the Macanese egg tarts. There's also Old Chang Kee where you can get the curry puffs. Not sure if the Old Chang Kee outlets are still open as they were not that busy when I last bought curry puffs from them. It's not that they don't taste good, it's just that their prices in Manila were very high that you can get several empanadas for one curry puff.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
There are a few Lord Stow's stores in Manila where you can get the Macanese egg tarts. There's also Old Chang Kee where you can get the curry puffs. Not sure if the Old Chang Kee outlets are still open as they were not that busy when I last bought curry puffs from them. It's not that they don't taste good, it's just that their prices in Manila were very high that you can get several empanadas for one curry puff.
Oh they have Old Chang Kee in Manila? Interesting.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well yes, Indonesia and Malaysia are very similar culturally, Malay culture has most in common with Sumatra. We share many dishes, like rendang, otak otak, a lot of fried fish, ikan bilis, satay, a lot of peanuts, coconut rice, sambal and rice (a lot of things with fried egg, nasi lemak combines all of this), nasi goreng, kueh lapis, same style of kari ayam/curry chicken.etc.
I heard that Johor and Singapore have bunches of Javanese community, it might explain everything, some of them arent actually Malays but are categorized as one. In malaysia the Malays are the whole Austronesian compared to Indonesia where it is a race of its own. Main difference between Malaysian-Indonesian food is simple, we use clove more and you used star anise. Coconut water is also more prominent here than in Malaysia whom used coconut milk.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,231,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
I heard that Johor and Singapore have bunches of Javanese community, it might explain everything, some of them arent actually Malays but are categorized as one. In malaysia the Malays are the whole Austronesian compared to Indonesia where it is a race of its own. Main difference between Malaysian-Indonesian food is simple, we use clove more and you used star anise. Coconut water is also more prominent here than in Malaysia whom used coconut milk.
Oh that's true. What are some differences between Javanese and West Sumatran/Malay culture? I think one is that many Javanese only have one name.

Yes star anise is indeed used a lot in Malaysian cuisine . Coconut milk is of course a big thing throughout Southeast Asia.
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