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Old 02-03-2014, 06:32 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
1,022 posts, read 3,144,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Oh that's true. What are some differences between Javanese and West Sumatran/Malay culture? I think one is that many Javanese only have one name.

Yes star anise is indeed used a lot in Malaysian cuisine . Coconut milk is of course a big thing throughout Southeast Asia.
The Javanese are more into their tradition and culture, they might be adherent to Islam but still practices form of their old believes. Many Javanese are still practicing old ceremonies and black magic, their culture are mixture of old religion, Hinduism and Islam.. and consider it as part of their heritage, they don't take these practices as blaspehmy but instead respect it. If Java remained Hindu-Buddhist you will just see another Bali on a larger scale really.

Sumatran Malay - almost like Malaysian Malays, but language form have changed in Sumatra and their culture is mostly untouched unlike the Malays in Malaysia with heavy influence from Bugis, and other races etc. They are known to be second most religious behind Aceh and their culture mostly have elements of Islam. Sumatran Malays actually have different branches, unlike Malays in Malaysia where they are considered as one.

 
Old 02-03-2014, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Likewise Portuguese egg tart (Pastel de nata) and milk pudding have been a staple in Macau for a long time as well. Many Singaporeans also eat a lot of western style pastries at home. Curry puffs are also very similar to empanadas.
Pastel de Nata was not really eaten in Macau a long time ago. I saw in a documentary show about the person who brought it there. It was a bit recent.

Is oven common in Singaporean houses ? Just asking because Singaporeans are mostly Chinese and Chinese don't normally eat sweets mostly fruits right ? In China, all the Apartments I have been do not have ovens and ovens are very rare in the appliance stores.

Last edited by Hermosaa; 02-03-2014 at 07:23 AM..
 
Old 02-03-2014, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,235,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
The Javanese are more into their tradition and culture, they might be adherent to Islam but still practices form of their old believes. Many Javanese are still practicing old ceremonies and black magic, their culture are mixture of old religion, Hinduism and Islam.. and consider it as part of their heritage, they don't take these practices as blaspehmy but instead respect it. If Java remained Hindu-Buddhist you will just see another Bali on a larger scale really.

Sumatran Malay - almost like Malaysian Malays, but language form have changed in Sumatra and their culture is mostly untouched unlike the Malays in Malaysia with heavy influence from Bugis, and other races etc. They are known to be second most religious behind Aceh and their culture mostly have elements of Islam. Sumatran Malays actually have different branches, unlike Malays in Malaysia where they are considered as one.
Interesting. So Muslims in Java are more tolerant of other religions? It seems Islam is less tolerant of syncreticism than Roman Catholicism. I wonder if they are as pious/zealous, because Jamaah Islamiyah is well known from Java, but of course represents a radical minority I assume? So most Indonesians are Javanese, then? Yet Indonesian is based more on a West Sumatran dialect, more like Malay? How come Indonesia is not based on Javanese, I wonder.

Yes, so Medan is like Malaysia? I know Aceh has sharia law, only place in SEA to have it. In Malaysia I think the government uses religion to exploit the Malays and help keep them in power.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Though I think most people associate creme caramel with France, maybe in the Philippines, but no one else thinks of it as Filipino cuisine.
I think Creme Caramel is famous in Anglo countries while in hispanic countries, it's Flan de Leche or just Flan introduced by Spain. I don't really know which country started it but they're done in different ways some put more eggs than others.

I didn't say it is Filipino because I even stated that it is a Spanish influenced dessert but has become like a Filipino symbol because a Filipino party is never complete without it. It is I guess aside from Lechon ( suckling pig ) one of the biggest contributions of Spain in Filipino cuisine. It probably has been around for 500 years now.

Since in the Philippines, it was introduced by the Spanish, I think of it more as a Spanish dessert. it's the Creme Brulee that is more French for me.

Crème caramel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by Hermosaa; 02-03-2014 at 07:29 AM..
 
Old 02-03-2014, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
1,022 posts, read 3,144,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Interesting. So Muslims in Java are more tolerant of other religions? It seems Islam is less tolerant of syncreticism than Roman Catholicism. I wonder if they are as pious/zealous, because Jamaah Islamiyah is well known from Java, but of course represents a radical minority I assume? So most Indonesians are Javanese, then? Yet Indonesian is based more on a West Sumatran dialect, more like Malay? How come Indonesia is not based on Javanese, I wonder.

Yes, so Medan is like Malaysia? I know Aceh has sharia law, only place in SEA to have it. In Malaysia I think the government uses religion to exploit the Malays and help keep them in power.
Javanese are very tolerant and in fact large number of converts into Christianity are by Javanese people, mainly during Suharto eras where apperently this act commited by Muslim is seen too evil.

And why it is not used as national language is because if we use Javanese language then it wouldn't be fair for all the other races, Bahasa Indonesia is influenced by the Dutch actually and are a based on Betawi Malay (native Jakartans) language, and Batavia is where the Dutch headquarter was, and it was used as trading language back then and then evolves gradually it transformed into Bahasa Indonesia. Bahasa Indonesia is used for unifying the 600 languages and dialects all over Indonesia under one banner. Javanese maybe dominant and presents almost 50% of the population but then in Java itself there are Sundanese, Maduranese etc whom do not speak Javanese language. So to use Javanese language as the national language just wouldn't make any sense at all.

Medan in a sense i almost similar to Malaysia, maybe less developed Malaysia you might see it as... large collection of colonial buildings, it also have Indian community and significant Chinese population. Bataknese also represent large number of the population, that might differ it though. There is a Malay Sultan palace and mosque in Medan, but they're very Arabic rather than Malays...
 
Old 02-03-2014, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,235,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Pastel de Nata was not really eaten in Macau a long time ago. I saw in a documentary show about the person who brought it there. It was a bit recent.

Is oven common in Singaporean houses ? Just asking because Singaporeans are mostly Chinese and Chinese don't normally eat sweets mostly fruits right ? In China, all the Apartments I have been do not have ovens and ovens are very rare in the appliance stores.
I think it's been awhile, it was introduced to HK later, but yeah not too sure. Either way it's pretty entrenched. But no Macau wasn't as influenced as the Philippines, don't know why really. Maybe because it was a tiny settlement.

Actually I've never thought about it. Been in a few houses but not too many kitchens, I don't really remember. Many Singaporeans eat out a lot as well. I guess a lot of food is just wok-fried, pan-fried, boiled or steamed.

I'm not sure how they cook roast chicken and roast duck.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,235,411 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
I think Creme Caramel is famous in Anglo countries while in hispanic countries, it's Flan de Leche or just Flan introduced by Spain. I don't really know which country started it but they're done in different ways some put more eggs than others.

I didn't say it is Filipino because I even stated that it is a Spanish influenced dessert but has become like a Filipino symbol because a Filipino party is never complete without it. It is I guess aside from Lechon ( suckling pig ) one of the biggest contributions of Spain in Filipino cuisine. It probably has been around for 500 years now.

Since in the Philippines, it was introduced by the Spanish, I think of it more as a Spanish dessert. it's the Creme Brulee that is more French for me.

Crème caramel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Yes, I don't know, I like it though, it's usually served in small servings for one person. Creme brulee is very French, of course, I assume creme caramel is the same.

Yes but do most ordinary poor Filipinos eat it, or only the more rich/western ones?
 
Old 02-03-2014, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,235,411 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
Javanese are very tolerant and in fact large number of converts into Christianity are by Javanese people, mainly during Suharto eras where apperently this act commited by Muslim is seen too evil.

And why it is not used as national language is because if we use Javanese language then it wouldn't be fair for all the other races, Bahasa Indonesia is influenced by the Dutch actually and are a based on Betawi Malay (native Jakartans) language, and Batavia is where the Dutch headquarter was, and it was used as trading language back then and then evolves gradually it transformed into Bahasa Indonesia. Bahasa Indonesia is used for unifying the 600 languages and dialects all over Indonesia under one banner. Javanese maybe dominant and presents almost 50% of the population but then in Java itself there are Sundanese, Maduranese etc whom do not speak Javanese language. So to use Javanese language as the national language just wouldn't make any sense at all.

Medan in a sense i almost similar to Malaysia, maybe less developed Malaysia you might see it as... large collection of colonial buildings, it also have Indian community and significant Chinese population. Bataknese also represent large number of the population, that might differ it though. There is a Malay Sultan palace and mosque in Medan, but they're very Arabic rather than Malays...
I heard Christians were still being persecuted in Java though? Maybe the government allows them to convert, but the society is still intolerant of it?

Ah, for some reason i heard it was more based on Sumatran Malay...but I mean, by population Java is the most populous so it would be like what other countries do, like China with Mandarin, or Spain with Castillian (sp?) Spanish.etc. Of course, imposing Indonesian is still imposing a language nonetheless, whether it's based on Javanese or something else.
 
Old 02-03-2014, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
1,022 posts, read 3,144,960 times
Reputation: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I heard Christians were still being persecuted in Java though? Maybe the government allows them to convert, but the society is still intolerant of it?

Ah, for some reason i heard it was more based on Sumatran Malay...but I mean, by population Java is the most populous so it would be like what other countries do, like China with Mandarin, or Spain with Castillian (sp?) Spanish.etc. Of course, imposing Indonesian is still imposing a language nonetheless, whether it's based on Javanese or something else.
Yes there are issues of minor church attack, but not heavy prosecution, in fact more attacks are carried againts muhammadiyah muslim sect rather than christian churches. The Javanese society tend to be acceptive towards religious minority, even if you eat pork in front of them wouldnt matter much and not taken offensive. In villages especially religious minority enjoys great freedom, rather than cities where globalization and information had spoiled the people's mindset. If a family member convert some are ok with it and some are not, they don't really force you to convert back though and some might get kicked out from the house, but mostly there might be slight resentment and disappointment but they tend to be generally fine with it. Yes radicals really represent small number of people in Java, afterall there are 130 million people there. Sundanese in Western Java out the bounderies of Jakarta however are more religious than the Javanese people.

This doesn't happen in Sumatra, especially by the Minangkabau, if they find out you convert you will not be considered Minagkabau (although there is a church using Minang language, and so does other languages) and have to exit your home.

If Indonesian government used Javanese language, then other races will think that only Javanese are favored by the javanese dominated government... because ethnic issue in Indonesia is rather serious in this matters, all wants equality. Javanese again are only in Java, not a huge island, and have many languages, they are not as many in other island except big city, they are not like Mandarin people who really dominate most of China. They represent minority in other islands where other ethnic lives. Indnesian language are based on Sumatran Malay language, and is considered as Malays but it has been influenced with other things like Dutch, Javanese, Sundanese etc and not entirely Malay anymore.

Not to mention Javanese sanskrit based handwriting, no... don't think other islands wanted it, that would screw their identity as an ethnic group, because Indonesia is not all Java but combination of various ethnic groups. Though Bahasa Indonesia is the main language, each islands have local language thought at schools.

Last edited by Goshio22; 02-03-2014 at 08:16 AM..
 
Old 02-03-2014, 08:02 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,998,915 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Yes, I don't know, I like it though, it's usually served in small servings for one person. Creme brulee is very French, of course, I assume creme caramel is the same.

Yes but do most ordinary poor Filipinos eat it, or only the more rich/western ones?
We all eat it. It's not seen as an upper class thing. I thought it was a Filipino desert for the longest
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