U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-26-2015, 10:45 AM
 
448 posts, read 501,512 times
Reputation: 170

Advertisements

Educated or rich Chinese want their kids to have good English level.

Nowadays, it is easy to come across local people in Shanghai, Beijing, Seoul, Taipei and Hong Kong with western education or near-native western English accents(American, British and Australian accents) Local kids who have not studied overseas but picked up a western English accent by being taught by native english teachers or watching US movies.

For westerners in Asia, these are the Asians they most likely to befriend or date with because these local Asians are more westernised and better in English than most of the local people.

Tokyo has very few such kind of westernised Japanese.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-26-2015, 11:45 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,310,849 times
Reputation: 7587
Quote:
Originally Posted by lokeung) View Post
Japanese maybe introvert, but they were extremely keen to learn from the Westerners. Japan was the first modern country in Asia, to adopt western innovation, clothings and systems of government. Became a military power but was wrong to invade others in world war 2. It is still the most developed country in Asia.

Koreans and Chinese are as introvert as the Japanese, and still look at foreigners with suspicion. They are all modernising but not very westernised nations. Any Koreans, Mainland Chinese, Singaporeans, Hongkongers and Taiwanese would be considered very outstanding and employed by large coporations in Asia with high pay if they graduated from Harvard, Yale, MIT, Oxbridge and Chicago. There are increasing number of Chinese with western education returning to work in fast-booming Shanghai. Don't know about the prospect of such graduates in Japan.

Right after world war 2, the US, Canada and Australia were better countries to live. Japanese did not have the English ability to move and they were still unofficially considered as enemy by people in allied countries for some years. It was difficult for them to be accepted in other countries.
Being culturally introverted is not the same thing with isolation. The Japanese excel at learning whoever is the strongest at the time (not just westerners, which is relatively a short period), but their culture is inward looking, Chinese and Koreans, less so.

Outward looking doesn't mean "westernized". I don't know why we talk about westernization as some common goal, as if it is a more advanced thing to do. Why would Asian countries with thousands of their own history want to be "westernized"? Of course there are a lot of western influences, but lifestyle and the way of thing aren't, and don't have to be "westernized" - which doesn't mean better.

The Japanese not having the English to move is not the real reason for not moving. How many Chinese who moved at that time spoke fluent English? Millions who live in US/Canada still don't speak decent English. But they are less attached to their homeland and want to try something, somewhere new for a different life, while the Japanese on the other hand, prefer sticking with their own, although they do learn from the strongest.

Speaking of job prospects, alumni connection is extremely important among Japanese enterprises, so if you graduate from Berkeley yet have no inside connection, it could be hard for you to be accepted and promoted. Japanese companies are internally more rigid. You might as well have graduated from a not so reputable university locally. In major Chinese cities however, western degrees have some glamour and are often preferred, and that has always been the tradition (since the early 1900s, as those students who studied abroad were considered cultural elites).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2015, 01:29 PM
 
448 posts, read 501,512 times
Reputation: 170
I think they did send some people to study in western countries in the early years of Meiji restoration, but much less when Japan became modern by the early 20th century. Many went to work in Hawaii and Brazil and did not return to Japan.

The Japanese actually think their country is better the US in some ways, there is little difference in level of development between Japan and the US. But China is not as developed as the US in education and technology, that's why western degrees have some glamour and are preferred. Of course China as a large country still have a lot of outstanding people, but without the western education.

Tokyo's residential real estate have became cheaper than Shanghai's. But rents of shops in Tokyo's busy shopping areas remain expensive. I would rather buy a house in Shanghai than Tokyo.

I also have the choices to choose US fund, Japan fund and China fund for my pension investment plan. China fund is the best performing. Japan fund is the last choice because of their slow performance.

Last edited by lokeung); 06-27-2015 at 01:39 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2015, 05:59 AM
 
919 posts, read 606,311 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
^Eh I feel like people everywhere just don't know much about the rest of the world, not just Americans. I've heard stories about how Taiwanese were mistaken as Thai abroad because of how similar Taiwan and Thailand sound like and I've experienced the exact same stuff myself in France.

And Asians are no better.
Wow, this is an awesome illustration!

I guess very few people understand what this implies exactly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2015, 06:26 AM
 
919 posts, read 606,311 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerbalm1985 View Post
I think Japanese are no so willing to learn other languages because of xenophobia.
It is funny for me to see this kind of statement.

When Chinese and Korean refused almost everything from Europe, Japanese tried to learn almost everything from Europe.

Both 電 and 雷 meant thunder originally. Since when 電 means electricity then? Since a Japanese learned the knowledge from books written in foreign language and gave 電 a new meaning.

I guess you are a Huaren(华人), who doesn't want to learn the local languages spoken originally in Singapore, exactly because of xenophobia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2015, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Singapore
653 posts, read 542,930 times
Reputation: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post
It is funny for me to see this kind of statement.

When Chinese and Korean refused almost everything from Europe, Japanese tried to learn almost everything from Europe.

Both 電 and 雷 meant thunder originally. Since when 電 means electricity then? Since a Japanese learned the knowledge from books written in foreign language and gave 電 a new meaning.

I guess you are a Huaren(华人), who doesn't want to learn the local languages spoken originally in Singapore, exactly because of xenophobia.
?????????????

I am a Singaporean, not Chinese.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2015, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,792 posts, read 5,155,746 times
Reputation: 4597
^I think he meant racially. After all Singaporean ID cards do contain one's race on it. I know that from a Singaporean friend, I've seen her card.
I almost wanted to point out how racist it is but eh it's not like Taiwan isn't a racist place so who am I to judge.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post
When Chinese and Korean refused almost everything from Europe, Japanese tried to learn almost everything from Europe.
And I agree with this.

I feel like many people are under certain impression that the Japanese speak particularly horrible English, not that it's not untrue but Japan's neighbors honestly are in NO position of mocking them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2015, 11:50 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,310 posts, read 23,803,150 times
Reputation: 11739
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
It is not so much about Japanese find their country very good, but rather the introverted culture itself. Unlike Koreans and Chinese for example, the Japanese look at anything foreign with suspicion. While an American degree usually receives high regard in China or Korea, with a foreign degree, including American ones, the Japanese upon returning to Japan might find it harder to finder good jobs.

True that few Japanese migrate overseas, but it has less to do with whether Japan is good or not. Americans and Canadians immigrate all the time. Plus, it is not like Japan has been doing well economically for the past 20 years - the country hardly had any growth. People keep forgetting that Japan is not always rich. Immediately after WII it was probably as poor as many developing countries, yet not many Japanese choose to immigrate. The reason is still the Japanese in general are less curious about other parts of the world, that that have an introvert culture and don't usually go out of their way to settle in different parts of the world.
Americans don't immigrate all the time. It's an extremely low percentage of US-born citizens that emigrate from the country permanently. It's the same for Canadians except for a somewhat larger percentage that gets pulled into the US.

Japan did have a significant amount of immigration, for its population size, for a period of time back when there was much greater population pressures and while it was working its way into becoming a developed country. Much of that immigration was to the Americas, but a lot of it was into other parts of East and Southeast Asia. Almost the entirety of the latter was reversed at the end of WWII because they were basically persona non grata--not really because there was a lack of will to emigrate or lack of curiosity. Meanwhile, countries that were still accepting of Japanese immigration, such as Brazil (which barely just stopped a complete ban on Japanese immigration by a single vote in the legislature), saw a strong growth in Japanese migrants.

And that 20 year of economic stagnation was also accompanied by population stagnation which meant there was rather limited push pressure to emigrate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-02-2015, 10:11 PM
 
919 posts, read 606,311 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigerbalm1985 View Post
?????????????

I am a Singaporean, not Chinese.
I was talking about your ethnicity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-03-2015, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Mount of Showing the Way
1,953 posts, read 2,076,689 times
Reputation: 615
Communism it will support the Shanghai After collapse.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top