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Old 02-23-2014, 07:32 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Well San Fran might be an obvious choice due to the Chinese community, but it also has the crowds etc. I'd say only New York, Philadelphia, Chicago and San Fran could really compare, with NY only really comparing that much with the bigger Chinese cities. I've been to Beijing, Tianjin, Xian, Chongqing, Fuzhou, Hong Kong btw of the largest cities. Would like to check out Shanghai. NYC Chinatown does remind you a little of Hong Kong.
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Old 02-23-2014, 07:34 PM
 
Location: singapore
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I'm from Singapore, never been Hong Kong.. Wonder how different Singapore is from Hong Kong...
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Old 02-23-2014, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by singaporelady View Post
I'm from Singapore, never been Hong Kong.. Wonder how different Singapore is from Hong Kong...
Oddly similar in some ways, but of course also very different.
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Old 02-23-2014, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
That's odd...I associate Chinese concentrating in the inner city, although there are a few suburban areas where they move due to cost. But I think many prefer the more urban inner city environments where there are also more Chinese grocery shops and restaurants.
That was the old style. They'd create a Chinatown in whatever-city.

These days though, they move to the suburbs. Looking at Los Angeles, you have suburban cities like Monterey Park, CA, a suburb of LA, which is well over 50% Chinese. Most of the suburbs around Monterey Park are also large numbers of Chinese. Looking at Los Angeles itself, not so much Chinese, although there is a Chinatown, it's not where the Chinese actually live.

Washington DC as well, most of the Chinese live up in Montgomery County, Maryland. There is a symbolic Chinatown in DC too, but it's more commercial, with the bulk of Chinese heading to MD or VA.

Meanwhile, it's the young white Americans trying to move into urban cities across the U.S. these days.
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Old 02-23-2014, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by singaporelady View Post
I'm from Singapore, never been Hong Kong.. Wonder how different Singapore is from Hong Kong...
Hong Kong is more dense, more tall buildings, built up with a large bay and tons of mountains, which just densify things even more.

Singapore feels quite spread out, less walkable - granted there are areas that are very walkable. But HK is way more walkable for much longer distances, without the long stretches of nothingness that you might feel in SG, if you try to walk long distances.

Also, SG is more colorful and colonial in appearance. I love the bring colored buildings with the walkways that protect you from the rain throughout much of SG. In HK, it's more like tall buildings galore everywhere. For the most part, with variation as well, but not as brightly colorful as SG.
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Old 02-23-2014, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
That was the old style. They'd create a Chinatown in whatever-city.

These days though, they move to the suburbs. Looking at Los Angeles, you have suburban cities like Monterey Park, CA, a suburb of LA, which is well over 50% Chinese. Most of the suburbs around Monterey Park are also large numbers of Chinese. Looking at Los Angeles itself, not so much Chinese, although there is a Chinatown, it's not where the Chinese actually live.

Washington DC as well, most of the Chinese live up in Montgomery County, Maryland. There is a symbolic Chinatown in DC too, but it's more commercial, with the bulk of Chinese heading to MD or VA.

Meanwhile, it's the young white Americans trying to move into urban cities across the U.S. these days.
Well here in Australia it seems the inner city is becoming more and more Chinese and to an extent Korean and other Asian. I remember in 2002 Melbourne's CBD sort of felt more European, especially with food, now it seems dominated by Asian, especially Chinese. There is a lot of food from mainland China and Taiwan, not your old style Cantonese. Many of the inner city apartments and townhouses are inhabited by or owned by Chinese or other Asians.

There are however quite a few suburban areas in Melbourne and Sydney with a lot of Chinese. Box Hill, Glen Waverley, Sunshine, and to an extent Springvale (also very SEA), Clayton, Dandenong, Footscray. The inner suburbs of North Melbourne, Docklands, Richmond, Carlton are becoming more Asian.
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Old 02-23-2014, 09:49 PM
 
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I can tell you Chengdu, Chongqing, Wuhan, all those major inland cities are different from the coastal cities. Wealth disparity among local people is much greater in these inland large cities than the eastern cities. Atmosphere is more relaxed in these western major cities than the busier eastern cities, food is hotter and less prone to foreign influence.
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Old 02-23-2014, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Hong Kong is more dense, more tall buildings, built up with a large bay and tons of mountains, which just densify things even more.

Singapore feels quite spread out, less walkable - granted there are areas that are very walkable. But HK is way more walkable for much longer distances, without the long stretches of nothingness that you might feel in SG, if you try to walk long distances.

Also, SG is more colorful and colonial in appearance. I love the bring colored buildings with the walkways that protect you from the rain throughout much of SG. In HK, it's more like tall buildings galore everywhere. For the most part, with variation as well, but not as brightly colorful as SG.
Yep, HK is a city built among hills/mountains. You have HK island itself, the main financial/business district, but also with quite a few dense residential areas, and the wealthier parts on the Peak and around the beach like Repulse Bay. You have many other large islands like Lamma and Lantau, while Singapore only has Sentosa and Pulau Ubin. One is a resort type place and the other more of a kampong. Hong Kong's urban area sort of creeps throughout the valleys and some of the lower hills like tendrils (the majority living on the mainland in the New Territories), while Singapore for the most part is quite flat. Singapore has quite a large reserve in the central area and a lot of it is actually not urbanised (nearly half). Hong Kong's downtown is more of an intense urban environment, whereas a lot of Singapore's 'busyness' if you like is sort of in the air-conditioned shopping malls. Hong Kong has retained less of it's colonial architecture, and is of course more avowedly Chinese in character while Singapore is more diverse and western.
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Old 02-23-2014, 09:59 PM
 
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All the major cities in Mainland China are dull and boring to a westerner, since they are all ruled by the CCP. These cities are all about business. And Chinese society is obviously less liberal than the west.

Tokyo, HK and Seoul are more vibrant with the trendy fashion, pop culture , entertainment & shopping.
Singapore & Dubai also very business oriented, but not bad for tourism.
Forget about Mumbai, Bangkok and other major cities of Asia.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Personally, I find Shanghai nowhere near like living in New York City. I find Shanghai a bit on the dull and boring side myself. I don't think the nightlife is all that good, and I don't find the Chinese people there all that interesting, cosmopolitan, or much of anything else that I'd attribute to New Yorkers. I don't even find the Shanghai people could compare to Chicago for that matter.

Chengdu, despite being 7 million, is actually VERY small and irrelevant in the Asia sphere of things. Personally I find Guangzhou and Shenzhen to be even more boring and dull despite being way more larger than Chengdu. So, population size doesn't necessary make it automatically more interesting.

If we're ONLY talking about vibrancy, than pretty much everywhere in Asia, is more vibrant than 98% of the U.S. though. So, if that's the ONLY criteria, and re-reading the OP again, it seems it might be the ONLY criteria, than New York City wins by default.

What's confusing is the OP is asking for US-China equivalents and states various Chinese cities, which leads to a direct comparison to different cities. Meanwhile, the majority of Asia is way more dynamic, walkable, street life oriented, and everything else, that only NYC provides. It doesn't mean they are equivalent to NYC though. It just means that Asian/Chinese cities are so way different from American cities, that you really can't compare or make equivalents whatsoever.
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Old 02-23-2014, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xmen_WORLD View Post
All the major cities in Mainland China are dull and boring to a westerner, since they are all ruled by the CCP. These cities are all about business. And Chinese society is obviously less liberal than the west.

Tokyo, HK and Seoul are more vibrant with the trendy fashion, pop culture , entertainment & shopping.
Singapore & Dubai also very business oriented, but not bad for tourism.
Forget about Mumbai, Bangkok and other major cities of Asia.
Beijing and Xian are pretty interesting, with their historic streetscapes, nightlife, street-food. I liked Xiamen, though it's not a major city. I didn't care much for Chongqing, Tianjin or Fuzhou.
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