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Old 03-16-2014, 11:58 PM
 
101 posts, read 231,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Well how do you explain why many more people live near the equator than near the poles?

Also, just from my experience, if a city has both hot and cold weather, I notice more people outside during the summer than in the winter. I think humans are more fit to live in an equator-type climate than somewhere like Alaska.
Warmer climate is more survivable, hence more people.

You fail to take into account that what humans naturally find comfortable is shifted to the right on the -+ scale, at 26C. With this point in mind, winters tend to be relatively a lot harsher than summers, where many naturally colder places tend to have summers that are in fact, below 26C on average, and might even leave you shivering without clothes.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate...Kingdom#Summer
http://www.currentresults.com/Weathe...-in-summer.php
Granted that there are instances where it's scorching hot, it's much more brief compared to say, equatorial places. What if we were to deviate from the ideal temperature by the same amount in both directions? 16C vs 36C, which is more comfortable? Or which one is easier to feel comfortable? Extreme temperatures aside, cooler is always better. Extra heat (and humidity) is also more stifling and tend to further induce uncomfortable conditions like sweaty, sticky skin. (I also notice that high temperatures tend to make me more irritable and aggressive, I have a hunch it's true though I have no data on this)

And another reason to why people go out more in the summer is because more heat/less frosty = less concern for survivability and more freedom for entertainment. However, it goes without saying that these people who enjoy outdoors during summer are also the same people who go home to a perfectly chilled, air-conditioned environment, they're not good examples of how a hot weather is ideal.

Oh and heater = more environmentally friendly.
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Old 03-17-2014, 02:16 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Well 'scorching temperatures' are generally not a feature of equatorial climates, which tend to be moist and very warm round, but seldom very hot (not usually about 35C/95F or so). More in the range of about 23 to 31 year round. Of course, in terms of survival an equatorial climate is preferable to even most temperate climates on temps alone, but there are many bugs and diseases in the jungle.
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Old 03-17-2014, 03:25 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,175,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by papafox View Post
I can't stop shaking my head......

It has one of the WORST climates in the world with literally the same weather every single day. I mean.....I'm no fan of winter and a ton of snow, but how God awful horrid to have all that humidity every freaking day with no end.

At least when its that humid in the Bahamas, I have beautiful sites like picturesque sandbars to look at, and of course, even there, it cools off by late October and isn't blazing again till April.

In Singapore its that H&H 12 months of the year, and you have NOTHING to show for it! No blue water, no nice beaches, no diving on prestine reefs, NOTHING!!

Must be fun to live somewhere NEVER cool enough to comfortably wear a business suit

And I haven't even touched on the lack of personal freedom compared to not just the USA, but most of the rest of the Western World as well (Canada, W Eurpoe, Australia, NZ)

Who the hell would want to live in that hell hole AND pay for that
#1 - Climate isn't the ONLY criteria for a best place to live.

#2 - Lack of freedom is debatable. I can't do anything I want in the U.S.A. I can't drink a beer in the public, for example, and I can't drink a beer at the beach. I can't create a restaurant out of my house either. The times I've been in Singapore, I've never thought, wow, I'm lacking a real sense of freedom here! It's about equal with the U.S. in many respects. Neither one I can do anything I want.

#3 - *sigh*...okay, let's start with The Bahamas. So, you are willing to pay top dollar to live there? Anyone who really looked into the Bahamas, could list a whole list of issues that would say it's not worth it. In the end, everything is relative. One person's paradise is another's hell.

Last edited by Tiger Beer; 03-17-2014 at 04:07 AM..
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Old 03-17-2014, 03:45 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,005,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastardised View Post
Warmer climate is more survivable, hence more people.

You fail to take into account that what humans naturally find comfortable is shifted to the right on the -+ scale, at 26C. With this point in mind, winters tend to be relatively a lot harsher than summers, where many naturally colder places tend to have summers that are in fact, below 26C on average, and might even leave you shivering without clothes.
Climate of the United Kingdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Average Summer Monthly Temperatures by USA State - Current Results
Granted that there are instances where it's scorching hot, it's much more brief compared to say, equatorial places. What if we were to deviate from the ideal temperature by the same amount in both directions? 16C vs 36C, which is more comfortable? Or which one is easier to feel comfortable? Extreme temperatures aside, cooler is always better. Extra heat (and humidity) is also more stifling and tend to further induce uncomfortable conditions like sweaty, sticky skin. (I also notice that high temperatures tend to make me more irritable and aggressive, I have a hunch it's true though I have no data on this)

And another reason to why people go out more in the summer is because more heat/less frosty = less concern for survivability and more freedom for entertainment. However, it goes without saying that these people who enjoy outdoors during summer are also the same people who go home to a perfectly chilled, air-conditioned environment, they're not good examples of how a hot weather is ideal.

Oh and heater = more environmentally friendly.
I agree that high heat+humidity is uncomfortable, but cold temperatures are just painful to me, add the wind and it's very painful. I'd rather be uncomfortable than in pain. And it seems that most people agree because summertime is always full of people out and about, whereas in the winter people are usually stuck inside. There are always summer camps, outdoor concerts, huge music festivals, etc during the summertime, but during the winter? Not nearly as much, if at all.

16 vs 36? obviously I'll take 16. That's nearly perfect for me. But to me, the extremes are more like 0 and 35. I'd take 35, even with humidity. You'd see more people outside when it's 35 than when it's 0. The only time that I kind of enjoy the cold is when it's around Christmas.
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Old 03-18-2014, 04:16 AM
 
101 posts, read 231,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well 'scorching temperatures' are generally not a feature of equatorial climates, which tend to be moist and very warm round, but seldom very hot (not usually about 35C/95F or so). More in the range of about 23 to 31 year round. Of course, in terms of survival an equatorial climate is preferable to even most temperate climates on temps alone, but there are many bugs and diseases in the jungle.
Maybe not literally scorching hot, but easily anything over 30C. There's rarely a day time where your car doesn't feel like an oven after being parked outside for some while. For example i have this program on my ipad that tracks or keep up on the daily weather (keep in mind i have no idea how accurate it is), it says 31C now and it's 6pm. 23C is in the lows but it's not as common.
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Old 03-18-2014, 04:23 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,005,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastardised View Post
Maybe not literally scorching hot, but easily anything over 30C. There's rarely a day time where your car doesn't feel like an oven after being parked outside for some while. For example i have this program on my ipad that tracks or keep up on the daily weather (keep in mind i have no idea how accurate it is), it says 31C now and it's 6pm. 23C is in the lows but it's not as common.
I take back what I said. it was near 32 F (0 C) today and it wasn't bad, but that's because it was dry. When it's humid and cold, it hurts. So maybe a humid 35 vs a dry 0, I would take the dry 0

But 90 vs 30 F (32 vs -1.1 C), I would prefer 90, and I think most people would, judging by the amount of activity that takes place when it's 90 vs the completely lack of activity that takes place when it's 30. 90 is slightly above the average high in Singapore, so I don't think Singapore has a hellish climate. Bangkok is closer to hellish
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Old 03-18-2014, 04:37 AM
 
101 posts, read 231,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I agree that high heat+humidity is uncomfortable, but cold temperatures are just painful to me, add the wind and it's very painful. I'd rather be uncomfortable than in pain. And it seems that most people agree because summertime is always full of people out and about, whereas in the winter people are usually stuck inside. There are always summer camps, outdoor concerts, huge music festivals, etc during the summertime, but during the winter? Not nearly as much, if at all.

16 vs 36? obviously I'll take 16. That's nearly perfect for me. But to me, the extremes are more like 0 and 35. I'd take 35, even with humidity. You'd see more people outside when it's 35 than when it's 0. The only time that I kind of enjoy the cold is when it's around Christmas.
I thought I've replied to the same thing. Less cold = less concern for survivability and more freedom for entertainment. The people who go out during 35C are the same people who go home to a 20C or so. In most cases summer is not hot. 20C may feel hot to some people but thats barely any heat at all.
http://www.city-data.com/forum/gener...mperature.html
Apparently most people prefer it 75F which is 23C, NOT 30C which is the normal temperature in equatorial places. With 80F being 26C, the overwhelming majority of people prefer it below that point. Keep in mind even 26 C temperature setting can feel very chilly to me especially in a reasonably small room, though i've not taken into account the humidity factor. I'm done and out.
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Old 03-18-2014, 06:15 AM
 
101 posts, read 231,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I take back what I said. it was near 32 F (0 C) today and it wasn't bad, but that's because it was dry. When it's humid and cold, it hurts. So maybe a humid 35 vs a dry 0, I would take the dry 0

But 90 vs 30 F (32 vs -1.1 C), I would prefer 90, and I think most people would, judging by the amount of activity that takes place when it's 90 vs the completely lack of activity that takes place when it's 30. 90 is slightly above the average high in Singapore, so I don't think Singapore has a hellish climate. Bangkok is closer to hellish
I'm using my ipad so it has taken longer to reply.

I'd say that people would generally prefer to be on the cooler side of things since bodies generate heat naturally. If there's a line that divides "just hot" and "just cold", most people would be standing on the cold side. While hot is more survivable, it's much easier to make yourself feel comfortable in the cold. As to why there are more outdoor activities in the summer, it's akin to asking would people prefer to swim in 0C or 50C, it's a no brainer really. People dont go out to have fun just to concern themselves with survivability. On the other hand, they would have much easier time making themselves feel comfortable at home when its 0C outside than when its 35C.
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:05 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,670,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastardised View Post
Maybe not literally scorching hot, but easily anything over 30C. There's rarely a day time where your car doesn't feel like an oven after being parked outside for some while. For example i have this program on my ipad that tracks or keep up on the daily weather (keep in mind i have no idea how accurate it is), it says 31C now and it's 6pm. 23C is in the lows but it's not as common.
Singapore is not that hot compared to Bangkok and other cities. It does feel hot due to the humidity and urban heat effect. However, there is also the sea that cools it down. It regularly goes to around 26 degrees or slightly colder almost every night actually. Singapore and West Malaysia are kind of in the wrong time zone and should have belonged to UTC+7 instead of UTC+8 time zone, so 6pm is actually like 5pm in other areas. The sun sets late due to that and it is often still sunny up to 7pm, while it is still dawn at 7am.
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Old 03-18-2014, 03:39 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,005,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastardised View Post
I'm using my ipad so it has taken longer to reply.

I'd say that people would generally prefer to be on the cooler side of things since bodies generate heat naturally. If there's a line that divides "just hot" and "just cold", most people would be standing on the cold side. While hot is more survivable, it's much easier to make yourself feel comfortable in the cold. As to why there are more outdoor activities in the summer, it's akin to asking would people prefer to swim in 0C or 50C, it's a no brainer really. People dont go out to have fun just to concern themselves with survivability. On the other hand, they would have much easier time making themselves feel comfortable at home when its 0C outside than when its 35C.
I really it depends on the climate that you're used to. Back in January and February, Manila was going through a "cold snap" People were really complaining that it was cold, with lows in the 60s and highs in the 80s. Many people were really uncomfortable with temps that most of the world would find very comfortable.
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