U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-18-2014, 05:32 PM
 
101 posts, read 233,653 times
Reputation: 31

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
Singapore is not that hot compared to Bangkok and other cities. It does feel hot due to the humidity and urban heat effect. However, there is also the sea that cools it down. It regularly goes to around 26 degrees or slightly colder almost every night actually. Singapore and West Malaysia are kind of in the wrong time zone and should have belonged to UTC+7 instead of UTC+8 time zone, so 6pm is actually like 5pm in other areas. The sun sets late due to that and it is often still sunny up to 7pm, while it is still dawn at 7am.
Not too sure about the timezone thing, but where I live (East Malaysia) 6pm is usually in the process of becoming darker instead of sunny and bright, 7pm is dark. There are exceptions, but IIRC it was still 31C (88F) at 7pm yesterday. I'd say it's generally cooler late at night and in the morning, 7.30am now and 24C (75F). Other than that anything over 9am under the sun is easily very hot (and too bright), and having visited Singapore I can't say it's any different.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-18-2014, 05:37 PM
 
101 posts, read 233,653 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I really it depends on the climate that you're used to. Back in January and February, Manila was going through a "cold snap" People were really complaining that it was cold, with lows in the 60s and highs in the 80s. Many people were really uncomfortable with temps that most of the world would find very comfortable.
Seriously lol 60 is easily AC temperature, and easily managed by throwing on a light jacket. Neither too hot nor too cold is ideal, but it's harder to cool down than warm up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2014, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,378,406 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastardised View Post
I'm using my ipad so it has taken longer to reply.

I'd say that people would generally prefer to be on the cooler side of things since bodies generate heat naturally. If there's a line that divides "just hot" and "just cold", most people would be standing on the cold side. While hot is more survivable, it's much easier to make yourself feel comfortable in the cold. As to why there are more outdoor activities in the summer, it's akin to asking would people prefer to swim in 0C or 50C, it's a no brainer really. People dont go out to have fun just to concern themselves with survivability. On the other hand, they would have much easier time making themselves feel comfortable at home when its 0C outside than when its 35C.
Well we do have air-conditioning and fans. I've been to China when it was freezing, and other places when it was even high 30s and low 40s (not to mention that is common in Perth in summer) and for vacation I'd choose the hotter climate anyday. China was so unpleasant (specifically Beijing and Xian) that it severely impacted my enjoyment of say the Forbidden City or the (ironically for the time) Summer Palace because I just wanted to be indoors someplace warm. Sure I wasn't AS well dressed as I should've been, but a lot of the discomfort was the rawness of the wind/air on my face.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2014, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,378,406 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
Singapore is not that hot compared to Bangkok and other cities. It does feel hot due to the humidity and urban heat effect. However, there is also the sea that cools it down. It regularly goes to around 26 degrees or slightly colder almost every night actually. Singapore and West Malaysia are kind of in the wrong time zone and should have belonged to UTC+7 instead of UTC+8 time zone, so 6pm is actually like 5pm in other areas. The sun sets late due to that and it is often still sunny up to 7pm, while it is still dawn at 7am.
Well yes, Singapore is moderately hot and just always very humid, while Bangkok has more variety. Bangkok in the dry season/winter is more pleasant than Singapore, although by this time of year it's already starting to get unpleasantly hot. Then you have the height of the wet season where conditions are more similar to Singapore, with cooler temps but higher humidity and lots of rain. Singapore is still pretty uncomfortable for one not used to a tropical climate, especially walking all day in the tropical sun.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2014, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,378,406 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I really it depends on the climate that you're used to. Back in January and February, Manila was going through a "cold snap" People were really complaining that it was cold, with lows in the 60s and highs in the 80s. Many people were really uncomfortable with temps that most of the world would find very comfortable.
Yeah in Vietnam people were donning jackets when highs were in the mid 20s (just below 80F) lol...In Bangkok on a typical 'winter' night the tuk tuk driver was like 'cold, isn't it?' when to me it felt like a typical balmy Perth summer's night. Bangkok in winter is remarkably like Perth in summer (about 19-30 with mostly clear skies and low humidity) except for the lack of heatwaves. Darwin is almost a mirror image of Bangkok climatically.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2014, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,378,406 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastardised View Post
Not too sure about the timezone thing, but where I live (East Malaysia) 6pm is usually in the process of becoming darker instead of sunny and bright, 7pm is dark. There are exceptions, but IIRC it was still 31C (88F) at 7pm yesterday. I'd say it's generally cooler late at night and in the morning, 7.30am now and 24C (75F). Other than that anything over 9am under the sun is easily very hot (and too bright), and having visited Singapore I can't say it's any different.
Well East Malaysia is considerably further east than West Malaysia or Singapore, so it's time zone makes more sense.

China has the most nonsensical time zone though, one time zone for a country the size of the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2014, 06:42 PM
 
1,111 posts, read 1,689,553 times
Reputation: 999
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I really it depends on the climate that you're used to. Back in January and February, Manila was going through a "cold snap" People were really complaining that it was cold, with lows in the 60s and highs in the 80s. Many people were really uncomfortable with temps that most of the world would find very comfortable.
Only part of the discomfort during that "cold front" was due to people not really uncomfortable with the temperature. Yes, some people do not have blankets or jackets suitable for it, but it's still not bad. There were no casualties unlike cold or heat waves in other countries. But that weather also brought about strong winds, heavier rains and was partly caused by a storm or low pressure area that lingered in the country for almost a week. That caused floods and some other damages by stronger winds. Most problematic is actually not for the people but damage to crops, which was substantial. Aside from floods in a few cities in Mindanao, most urban people were not complaining very much about it being "cold" but a disruption of their routines such as their laundry has not dried for a week.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2014, 01:04 PM
 
Location: London, UK
2,702 posts, read 4,830,685 times
Reputation: 1651
I lived in Singapore for a few months and found it an extremely pleasant city, climate included (I love warm weather). The quality of life is higher than anywhere I've seen in Europe or the US. It's very clean, modern, efficient, green, and the crime rate is close to zero.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-19-2014, 06:59 PM
 
101 posts, read 233,653 times
Reputation: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well we do have air-conditioning and fans. I've been to China when it was freezing, and other places when it was even high 30s and low 40s (not to mention that is common in Perth in summer) and for vacation I'd choose the hotter climate anyday. China was so unpleasant (specifically Beijing and Xian) that it severely impacted my enjoyment of say the Forbidden City or the (ironically for the time) Summer Palace because I just wanted to be indoors someplace warm. Sure I wasn't AS well dressed as I should've been, but a lot of the discomfort was the rawness of the wind/air on my face.
You're probably right that very low temperatures can impede the eagerness and enjoyment during traveling, but the same thing has happened to me during hot weather. I just can't wait to go back to our accommodation most of the time. Sometimes it's not the temperature per se but the stickiness, dizziness, moodiness and irritability that comes with it. I'd say hot and cold brings about different types of discomfort, cold is more painful and hot is more irritating, the threshold is different for each person I guess but at least cold doesn't bring anything else along with it. I've had very cold wind blowing in my face but it felt refreshing, probably cuz it's not really that cold (freezing point).

Fan doesn't do much to reduce the heat itself and for some reason air-conditioning felt very unnatural to me compared to heating, probably because most reactions naturally produce heat rather than cold air. I know it doesn't make much sense but I have this inclination to minimize AC usage and use more fan instead, lol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-20-2014, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,378,406 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bastardised View Post
You're probably right that very low temperatures can impede the eagerness and enjoyment during traveling, but the same thing has happened to me during hot weather. I just can't wait to go back to our accommodation most of the time. Sometimes it's not the temperature per se but the stickiness, dizziness, moodiness and irritability that comes with it. I'd say hot and cold brings about different types of discomfort, cold is more painful and hot is more irritating, the threshold is different for each person I guess but at least cold doesn't bring anything else along with it. I've had very cold wind blowing in my face but it felt refreshing, probably cuz it's not really that cold (freezing point).

Fan doesn't do much to reduce the heat itself and for some reason air-conditioning felt very unnatural to me compared to heating, probably because most reactions naturally produce heat rather than cold air. I know it doesn't make much sense but I have this inclination to minimize AC usage and use more fan instead, lol.
That's true, heat can be an impediment when spending a lot of time outdoors, especially if doing something active or strenuous. Hiking in tropical Rainforest being an example. The stickiness certainly is not pleasant at all. I guess lime you said though I find cold more painful and even real threat to survival compares to heat if shade and water is always at hand.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top