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Old 03-21-2014, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
471 posts, read 2,460,334 times
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I was born and raised in the US, but my parents were both born in the Philippines and came over and got naturalized some 30 years ago.

Would I qualify for being able to apply for dual citizenship? No other reason than "just because", on my end. I've never been back since I was younger, and I don't know, I like having options as far as places to live, etc.

I've looked over the embassy site, but I was wondering if anyone knew from personal experience.
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Old 03-21-2014, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Miami/NYC
1,207 posts, read 2,020,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBaillo View Post
I was born and raised in the US, but my parents were both born in the Philippines and came over and got naturalized some 30 years ago.

Would I qualify for being able to apply for dual citizenship? No other reason than "just because", on my end. I've never been back since I was younger, and I don't know, I like having options as far as places to live, etc.

I've looked over the embassy site, but I was wondering if anyone knew from personal experience.
you qualify through jus sanguini. Yes its been legal since 2003. Im in the same spot you dont have to take an oath for citizenship you can apply for a passport
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Old 03-21-2014, 10:53 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,997,592 times
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Do you know if your parents (or at least one) was a Philippine citizen at the time of your birth? If so, then you are a dual citizen by blood. Your parents were supposed to file a "report of birth abroad" with the Philippine consulate serving the area where you were born. If they didn't do it, you have to file a delayed report of birth abroad, and then you can officially get dual citizenship. I think you first need to show proof that your parents(s) were citizens of the Philippines at the time of your birth. So you'll need an old Filipino passport, your birth certificate, and I think that's enough to file the delayed report of birth.

I dont know the full details, but look at this page and all the comments for more info
https://www.facebook.com/Philippine.Dual.Citizenship
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Old 03-21-2014, 11:57 AM
 
399 posts, read 579,436 times
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My sons are in a similar situation. They are still babies 3 and 1. Both born in the Philippines. My wife being the Philippines citizen and I being a U.S. citizen. My older son has a U.S. passport and Philippines passport. We did a report of birth abroad. So I figure even when they are old enough they should have their dual citizenship. I hope that they can travel to the Philippines and have no issues staying there or doing anything there if they like to. For me as a visitor I need to pay money for visas and to stay for a certain amount of time.
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Old 03-21-2014, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
471 posts, read 2,460,334 times
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Thanks all.

Yes, our family's story is a long one, but, in short, my mom came over first. I was conceived in the Philippines but was born shortly after she came here. At 8 mos, she sent me back to the PI to live with my dad and his family so she could focus on building a life here for us, preparing for myself and my dad to come back. She picked me back up when I was 4 years old, and my dad followed when I was 5 or 6 (I forget). So when I was born, my mom was still technically petitioned, not yet a citizen, and my dad, obviously wasn't a citizen yet, as he was still living in the PI until many years after my birth.

So I guess that makes it straightforward then? Since both were still technically PI citizens when I was born.

EDIT:

I guess the next logical question is in regards to my daughters, if I end up getting dual citizenship. Would they be too far removed to enjoy the same benefits of dual citizenship, or would they still qualify as well, being the children of a dual citizen?
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Old 03-21-2014, 04:26 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,997,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBaillo View Post
Thanks all.

Yes, our family's story is a long one, but, in short, my mom came over first. I was conceived in the Philippines but was born shortly after she came here. At 8 mos, she sent me back to the PI to live with my dad and his family so she could focus on building a life here for us, preparing for myself and my dad to come back. She picked me back up when I was 4 years old, and my dad followed when I was 5 or 6 (I forget). So when I was born, my mom was still technically petitioned, not yet a citizen, and my dad, obviously wasn't a citizen yet, as he was still living in the PI until many years after my birth.

So I guess that makes it straightforward then? Since both were still technically PI citizens when I was born.

EDIT:

I guess the next logical question is in regards to my daughters, if I end up getting dual citizenship. Would they be too far removed to enjoy the same benefits of dual citizenship, or would they still qualify as well, being the children of a dual citizen?
That's where it gets fuzzy. I would think that since you were technically born as a Philippine citizen (through jus sanguinis) then that means that your kids were also technically born to a Philippine citizen. But I don't know if you had to officially be a passport-holding citizen when they were born.

I would ask the question here
https://www.facebook.com/Philippine.Dual.Citizenship

or if you don't have facebook, ask it here
Philippine Dual Citizenship

It seems that more and more Filipinos who were born abroad are trying to claim their Filipino citizenship. Maybe because the Philippines is becoming a better place to live? I dunno
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Old 03-21-2014, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
471 posts, read 2,460,334 times
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I just like options. If I ever decide to go back, especially for an extended amount of time (since I still have a lot of extended family there), I'd just like it to be as easy as possible with little restrictions.

I grew up in SE L.A. so much of my early life I was a honorary Mexican LOL. Being a first generation US citizen also came with a lot of culture clash issues between my parents and myself. I didn't really care about my Filipino heritage until my mid 20's.

But this isn't because I'm trying to ditch America and hold on to my native roots or anything. I'm literally just interested in it as a "just because". And it would be nice for my daughters, especially my oldest one, who grew up much more aware of her culture than me, to maybe see the "homeland" one day. I was pretty young when I was there, but I still have some awesome memories of my early childhood there.

I stayed with my dad and his family in Bohol, Cebu. But everything I hear from that side of the family states that the virgin beaches that we used to walk to every other day and swim in, are now all resorts and hotels.

Plus I always have a dream of living alone in some shack in the deep forest of some NE US state, or the beaches of the Philippines, living off the grid, and only my kids know how to find me (if my wife dies first of course LOL)
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Old 03-21-2014, 05:59 PM
 
201 posts, read 264,849 times
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Quote:
But this isn't because I'm trying to ditch America and hold on to my native roots or anything. I'm literally just interested in it as a "just because". And it would be nice for my daughters, especially my oldest one, who grew up much more aware of her culture than me, to maybe see the "homeland" one day. I was pretty young when I was there, but I still have some awesome memories of my early childhood there.
Do you speak Tagalog or Cebuano? It seems most Filipinos look down on Fil-Ams that don't speak the mother tongue.
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Old 03-21-2014, 07:12 PM
 
621 posts, read 381,929 times
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yes this would be the most exciting times for the Philippines and for all Filipinos living in and out of the country! Pretty good times to invest, and of course it would be easier if one has the citizenship. You cant have 100% ownership if you are not.
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Old 03-21-2014, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
471 posts, read 2,460,334 times
Reputation: 618
I speak ilonggo fluently. I understand Tagalog and can speak a little.
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