U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 04-12-2014, 05:32 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
1,022 posts, read 3,146,946 times
Reputation: 219

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Interesting. Yeah Bahasa Indonesia is based on Sumatran dialect right? Is Javanese mutually intelligible with Bahasa?
Nope, there is quiet some loanwords from the Javanese language but other Indonesian who have different mother tongue wouldn't be able to understand Javanese at all, even Sundanese or Maduranese who live next to each other with the Javanese people. They probably catch a few words that sounds similar but sounds slightly different because the Javanese pronounce loads of "a" as "o", like "wong jowo" which simply means "orang jawa" or javanese people..

 
Old 04-12-2014, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,853,759 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
Nope, there is quiet some loanwords from the Javanese language but other Indonesian who have different mother tongue wouldn't be able to understand Javanese at all, even Sundanese or Maduranese who live next to each other with the Javanese people. They probably catch a few words that sounds similar that sounds slightly different because the Javanese pronounce loads of "a" as "o", like "wong jowo" which simply means "orang jawa" or javanese people..
Do you pronounce the " J " like letter j ?
 
Old 04-12-2014, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,252,153 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
Nope, there is quiet some loanwords from the Javanese language but other Indonesian who have different mother tongue wouldn't be able to understand Javanese at all, even Sundanese or Maduranese who live next to each other with the Javanese people. They probably catch a few words that sounds similar but sounds slightly different because the Javanese pronounce loads of "a" as "o", like "wong jowo" which simply means "orang jawa" or javanese people..
Interesting. Yeah Bahasa Indonesian and Tagalog have similar roles in their country, although I believe Tagalog is the local dialect/language of Southern Luzon while Indonesian is not the local language of the Jakarta area/western Java.
 
Old 04-12-2014, 05:58 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
1,022 posts, read 3,146,946 times
Reputation: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Do you pronounce the " J " like letter j ?
Yup that's how we do it, quiet deep "j" too if i must say.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Interesting. Yeah Bahasa Indonesian and Tagalog have similar roles in their country, although I believe Tagalog is the local dialect/language of Southern Luzon while Indonesian is not the local language of the Jakarta area/western Java.
Well Bahasa Betawi actually are formed through the Portuguese people of Malacca or the "Mardijikers" who were taken as war captive to Batavia after the fall of Malacca to the Dutch (not necesarily portuguese descent usually slaves from other parts of their colony who practice portuguese culture) who were once dominant population of Batavia/Jakarta before, they spoke Malay language with Portuguese slangs (explaining some portuguese loanwords, though this also come from Moluccas and Portuguese introduction of Christianity such as the word for church, which in Indonesians are 'gereja or in portuguese "igreja"), also the fact that there are slaves from other parts of Indonesia, means that the language gradually changed little by little including borrowing words from the Dutch and Chinese language. So that's how Betawi actually influences Bahasa Indonesia as in general..

Because of the Sumatran influence, the Malay language also already become a trading language which most people in the archipelago atleast understand a little, and gradually because the Dutch people are more familiar with it being in Batavia for most of their history and are totally used to the Betawi slangs, it grows well as a lingua franca language and eventually grow to Bahasa Indonesia by lending each other with words.
 
Old 04-12-2014, 06:07 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,670,934 times
Reputation: 971
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
Yup that's how we do it, quiet deep "j" too if i must say.



Well Bahasa Betawi actually are formed through the Portuguese people of Malacca or the "Mardijikers" who were taken as war captive to Batavia after the fall of Malacca to the Dutch (not necesarily portuguese descent usually slaves from other parts of their colony who practice portuguese culture) who were once dominant population of Batavia/Jakarta before, they spoke Malay language with Portuguese slangs (explaining some portuguese loanwords, though this also come from Moluccas and Portuguese introduction of Christianity such as the word for church, which in Indonesians are 'gereja or in portuguese "igreja"), also the fact that there are slaves from other parts of Indonesia, means that the language gradually changed little by little including borrowing words from the Dutch and Chinese language. So that's how Betawi actually influences Bahasa Indonesia as in general..

Because of the Sumatran influence, the Malay language also already become a trading language which most people in the archipelago atleast understand a little, and gradually because the Dutch people are more familiar with it being in Batavia for most of their history and are totally used to the Betawi slangs, it grows well as a lingua franca language and eventually grow to Bahasa Indonesia by lending each other with words.
What's the difference between Bahasa Betawi and Bahasa Indonesia?
 
Old 04-12-2014, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,252,153 times
Reputation: 2833
Interesting, so is that way Bahasa Indonesian is not Javanese?
 
Old 04-12-2014, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
1,022 posts, read 3,146,946 times
Reputation: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
What's the difference between Bahasa Betawi and Bahasa Indonesia?
Well like the "Malaysian Malay", Betawi language pronounce the end word "a" as "e", but pronounce it as "" rather than how the Malays usually pronounce it, it maybe Balinese slave's influence however because that's how the Balinese pronounce it. Well in Betawi language there are more Hokkien and few other slangs used rather than Bahasa Indonesia's way, it's largely Malay language however, i think Bahasa Indonesia simply have more Malay language elements and pronounce things more in alphabeth's pronounciation order than Betawi.

Oh and i think because of Malacca's trade influence the Dutch learns it first before they start conquering Indonesia, and the people in Batavia knew it so Sundanese language which was then dominant language in the town didn't grow as much. And well i already explained how other ethnic eventually dominate rather than the Sundanese, mainly because the Dutch didn't want riot there so other ethnic than Javanese/Sundanese are prefered.

Well i forgot to mention since Betawi language influence Jakarta's Bahasa Indonesia, or we like to associate it to "bahasa gaul' or the cool way to pronounce thing, lots of people from other parts of the country use the slang too, but not all slang they understand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Interesting, so is that way Bahasa Indonesian is not Javanese?
Pretty much.. colonial influence is the bigger factor than trading language influence, i think.

Last edited by Goshio22; 04-12-2014 at 06:47 AM..
 
Old 04-12-2014, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
1,022 posts, read 3,146,946 times
Reputation: 219
This is Bahasa Betawi in case some of you wonder:



Bahasa Indonesia:

 
Old 04-12-2014, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,252,153 times
Reputation: 2833
I'm familiar with Indonesian (and Malay) since I hear it a lot in Perth. My parents can speak Malay (my mother less so) too.
 
Old 04-12-2014, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,761 posts, read 6,969,348 times
Reputation: 402
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Interesting. Yeah Bahasa Indonesian and Tagalog have similar roles in their country, although I believe Tagalog is the local dialect/language of Southern Luzon while Indonesian is not the local language of the Jakarta area/western Java.
There's a lot of tagalog versions in Tagalog region, Tagalog means Taga-Ilog or in English 'People that lives in the River". Bulacan, Cavite, Quezon, Bataan, Laguna, Batangas, and NCR so there are some places that their tagalog word has different meaning in other tagalog areas. Like the word 'Nakain' and 'Kumain' has different meaning to other tagalog. Accent also, Like Bulacan Accent is different in Batangas or Batangas to Tagalog NCR etc..

Batangas Accent

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4xmFRqG69U

Bulacan Accent

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FF0LnkKxMTQ

Last edited by pinai; 04-12-2014 at 12:57 PM..
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top