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Old 04-03-2014, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,228,213 times
Reputation: 2833

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Quote:
Originally Posted by singaporelady View Post
Nope...
Interesting. I mean I don't deny my Chinese ancestry, but I suppose it is more just ancestry. What do I primarily identify as? To me it's not that important. My nationality is Australian, my birthplace Singapore. I try to take aspects of culture from everywhere, I prefer to identify mostly as an 'Earthling' or a citizen of planet earth. I am interested in Taoism/Chinese philosophy and like some Chinese food, but culturally, I claim myself no more Chinese than most Australians.

 
Old 04-03-2014, 05:42 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,228,213 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Susu Enrico View Post
not hating but do you know how stupid that sounds?
then what about the uyghur people that do not speak mandarin or any other han chinese language?
if the han chinese cannot accept them as chinese either then they should just let them have their own country, tibetian as well and other non han chinese minorities
Most of the minorities, at least those under say 65, can speak Mandarin. Children are all taught it in school so I think they will become ethnically Chinese to some extent at least. Certainly moreso than myself who only has Chinese ancestry. To me ethnicity is more about culture: language, cuisine, dress (though that applies less so), mindset...I asked my Vietnamese and Japanese friend to teach me how to use chopsticks correctly, that's how much of a 'banana' some might consider me lol.
 
Old 04-03-2014, 05:46 AM
 
Location: Woodbridge, VA
82 posts, read 201,999 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Most of the minorities, at least those under say 65, can speak Mandarin. Children are all taught it in school so I think they will become ethnically Chinese to some extent at least. Certainly moreso than myself who only has Chinese ancestry. To me ethnicity is more about culture: language, cuisine, dress (though that applies less so), mindset...I asked my Vietnamese and Japanese friend to teach me how to use chopsticks correctly, that's how much of a 'banana' some might consider me lol.
lol are you for real here?

OK maybe they can speak mandarin but culturally and physically they're totally different.

@singaporelady
isn't there a possibility that most singaporean chinese have some malay dna in them?
to those that you know do have, but they look pure chinese to you and speak chinese as well. do you consider them as chinese?
 
Old 04-03-2014, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,228,213 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Susu Enrico View Post
lol are you for real here?

OK maybe they can speak mandarin but culturally and physically they're totally different.

@singaporelady
isn't there a possibility that most singaporean chinese have some malay dna in them?
to those that you know do have, but they look pure chinese to you and speak chinese as well. do you consider them as chinese?
Well there are obvious cultural differences, there are also cultural differences within 'China proper' and within the monolithic 'Han' ethnicity. The Minnan/Hoklo people of southern Fujian province speak a different language, eat different food.etc from those in Shandong or Sichuan. At least before standardisation.

I don't think that many Singaporean Chinese have some Malay, although there is a not insignificant number who do and also the Peranakan/Baba/Nyonya/Straits Chinese, of which I have some ancestry myself.
 
Old 04-03-2014, 05:56 AM
 
Location: singapore
1,526 posts, read 1,270,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Susu Enrico View Post
lol are you for real here?

OK maybe they can speak mandarin but culturally and physically they're totally different.

@singaporelady
isn't there a possibility that most singaporean chinese have some malay dna in them?
to those that you know do have, but they look pure chinese to you and speak chinese as well. do you consider them as chinese?
As what the Postman have said, those singaporean chinese with "Malay DNA " with them i don't deny they exist, but definitely not form the majority.

Our pioneer Mr Lee Kuan Yew is the best example he have peranakan blood in him..

As to whether i personally consider them chinese, i would say half/partial chinese or etc depending on how assimilated they are with chinese customs and how much malay dna they have in their blood etc...

Again it is just my personal opinion
 
Old 04-03-2014, 10:25 PM
 
201 posts, read 264,788 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
If you ask me for my opinion, I would say Chinese descent who can't speak Chinese are not Chinese to me.. Period
From the quote above, it seems that being ethnically Chinese is not as important as being culturally Chinese. Since language is a big component of culture, you are not considered "Chinese" in that context.

In a hypothetical scenario, what if Chinese Singaporeans were threatened en masse? Would China intervene and help their "people" or not because they aren't considered Chinese? (This would be similar to the real-life example of Russia justifying the occupation of Crimea to protect the Russian-speaking majority over there.)
 
Old 04-03-2014, 10:31 PM
 
Location: singapore
1,526 posts, read 1,270,803 times
Reputation: 416
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
From the quote above, it seems that being ethnically Chinese is not as important as being culturally Chinese. Since language is a big component of culture, you are not considered "Chinese" in that context.

In a hypothetical scenario, what if Chinese Singaporeans were threatened en masse? Would China intervene and help their "people" or not because they aren't considered Chinese? (This would be similar to the real-life example of Russia justifying the occupation of Crimea to protect the Russian-speaking majority over there.)
I really have no idea if China will help Singapore if that situation arises.. It's anybody's guess to me..
 
Old 04-03-2014, 10:38 PM
 
201 posts, read 264,788 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by singaporelady View Post
I really have no idea if China will help Singapore if that situation arises.. It's anybody's guess to me..
I think the bigger question would be: What does mainland China think, in general, about "overseas Chinese" (aka Hǎiwi Hurn)?

Quote:
then what about the uyghur people that do not speak mandarin or any other han chinese language?
Interesting, this brings another facet to the "identity debate": nationality. Perhaps China would accept an uyghur more so than an overseas Chinese person (who doesn't speak Chinese) because at least the uyghur is a Chinese national and therefore contributes to the national economy (at least in theory).
 
Old 04-03-2014, 11:15 PM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,667,247 times
Reputation: 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Susu Enrico View Post
not hating but do you know how stupid that sounds?
then what about the uyghur people that do not speak mandarin or any other han chinese language?
if the han chinese cannot accept them as chinese either then they should just let them have their own country, tibetian as well and other non han chinese minorities
Actually, for mainland Chinese, that is easy. The word for Chinese (people from China, regardless of ethnic group) is Zhongguoren and the word for Han Chinese (the ethnic group) is Hanren or Huaren. Uyghurs are therefore Zhongguoren but are not Hanren. These are the same words used in Singapore if speaking in Mandarin, Chinese is Huaren and the Chinese language is Huayu. People do not identify as Zhongguoren anymore because they are not citizens of China.
 
Old 04-04-2014, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,228,213 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanjelman7 View Post
I think the bigger question would be: What does mainland China think, in general, about "overseas Chinese" (aka Hǎiwi Hurn)?


Interesting, this brings another facet to the "identity debate": nationality. Perhaps China would accept an uyghur more so than an overseas Chinese person (who doesn't speak Chinese) because at least the uyghur is a Chinese national and therefore contributes to the national economy (at least in theory).
A question I posed before:

What do Chinese in China think of 'Overseas Chinese?'

Yes I think an Uyghur who can speak Putonghua fluently is practically speaking far more Chinese than I will ever be.
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