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Old 04-17-2014, 10:42 AM
 
601 posts, read 586,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
No snake? I'm surprised, snake is commonly eaten in that region. So the Lao don't share the Vietnamese fondness for dog meat?

Well no, roti is an Indian thing, although the roti prata/roti canai you find in Singapore and Malaysia is kind of a local adaptation.
I'm sure some people will still eat snake, but I was told it's a religious no-no, snakes are considered either unclean. Same for cats - except it's because they are sacred.

I'm not sure the reason, but not only did my extended Lao family tell me sternly that they do not eat dogs in Laos, they went as far as to warn me not to buy pork buns from Vietnamese people selling them in Vientiane, because they might have dog meat in it. While I was there, I saw a lot of people had "pet" dogs, so that could be a reason why.

I mentioned roti cause I've seen roti in thai cooking, so it's a difference between Thailand and Laos.
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Old 04-18-2014, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,228,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceMonkyPunks View Post
I'm sure some people will still eat snake, but I was told it's a religious no-no, snakes are considered either unclean. Same for cats - except it's because they are sacred.

I'm not sure the reason, but not only did my extended Lao family tell me sternly that they do not eat dogs in Laos, they went as far as to warn me not to buy pork buns from Vietnamese people selling them in Vientiane, because they might have dog meat in it. While I was there, I saw a lot of people had "pet" dogs, so that could be a reason why.

I mentioned roti cause I've seen roti in thai cooking, so it's a difference between Thailand and Laos.
According to Buddhism? Maybe Theravada Buddhism is more strict about it. Snake meat is certainly a delicacy among many in countries where Mahayana Buddhism is practised like Vietnam, China and even Taiwan.

Interesting, maybe they personally didn't care for dogs. I've heard some tribes in Thailand eat dog meat but it doesn't seem that common. Roasted rats seem pretty common in much of rural Southeast Asia.

Part of Thai cuisine? Never heard of it. I mean roti is made of wheat, and wheat isn't even grown in Thailand. Sure it wasn't an Indian restaurant, or an Indian dish in a Thai restaurant?

Speaking E and S Asian, both China and India have wheat-based dishes that SEA generally lacks. Scallion pancakes are similar to roti prata/canai in Singapore/Malaysia, and you also have various unleavened flatbreads in China.
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Old 04-18-2014, 07:18 PM
 
Location: East coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Part of Thai cuisine? Never heard of it. I mean roti is made of wheat, and wheat isn't even grown in Thailand. Sure it wasn't an Indian restaurant, or an Indian dish in a Thai restaurant?
But an ingredient doesn't necessarily have to be grown natively to be part of a cuisine if it was obtained through trade or colonial influence or some other way, right?

Otherwise, a bunch of European dishes would be disqualified as European if they included ingredients that couldn't be grown in Europe, right down to the chocolate in the desserts.
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Old 04-18-2014, 07:21 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
But an ingredient doesn't necessarily have to be grown natively to be part of a cuisine if it was obtained through trade or colonial influence or some other way, right?

Otherwise, a bunch of European dishes would be disqualified as European if they included ingredients that couldn't be grown in Europe, right down to the chocolate in the desserts.
I did realise that, but I've never seen any roti dish at a Thai restaurant here or in Thailand, unless one is referring to Thai pancakes:

Thai Pancake - Thai Roti Recipe - Food.com - 457508

In that case crepe-like dishes are found all over Asia.
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Old 04-21-2014, 09:16 AM
 
3 posts, read 3,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Is that brahman or ongole?
both, I mean crossbreeding between brahman ongole and java cow
CMIIW
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Old 04-22-2014, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Western Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well obviously it depends on the country...

Thailand - has the influence of India in curries, and the range of spices used, but overall it seems closer to Chinese to me.
Indian curries and Thai curries are both generally spicy-hot, and complex in spices, but other than that not similar at all. The use of the word "curry" for both of these is a bit of a mystery. It might be because the English used the same name for both. It's not clear at all that Thailand got its curries from Indian influence--it's likely that Thai curries originate in Thailand.
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Old 04-22-2014, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Western Oregon
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The word "roti" is a Hindi word, but maybe also just as native to other languages. The origin isn't clear. It might predate history. The same is true of the word "tandoor", although that word is more a central to western Asian word.
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Old 04-22-2014, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodstockSchool1980 View Post
Indian curries and Thai curries are both generally spicy-hot, and complex in spices, but other than that not similar at all. The use of the word "curry" for both of these is a bit of a mystery. It might be because the English used the same name for both. It's not clear at all that Thailand got its curries from Indian influence--it's likely that Thai curries originate in Thailand.
True, I mean nobody who knows curry would really confuse the two, I guess I mean more the idea of curries, but you're right, they might not necessarily be primary of Indian origin. Of course, curry itself has a rather broad definition, it can mean anything from the more stew-like Japanese curry, to Indian and SE curries. 'Curry powder', which is a mix of spices, nor chilli is actually a necessary ingredient. Of course chilli peppers actually originate in the Americas, so quite ironically it was colonialism which brought chilli to the diets of people all throughout Asia.
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Old 04-22-2014, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
1,022 posts, read 3,144,102 times
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^except certain country who already have taste bud for spicy food, like thailand and indonesia.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodstockSchool1980 View Post
The word "roti" is a Hindi word, but maybe also just as native to other languages. The origin isn't clear. It might predate history. The same is true of the word "tandoor", although that word is more a central to western Asian word.
Roti in indonesian language means bread.
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Old 04-22-2014, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Western Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
^except certain country who already have taste bud for spicy food, like thailand and indonesia.

Roti in indonesian language means bread.
Cool! It's a truly international word.

Roti=roti=roti
Kopi=coffee
the=tea=chai=cha
dua=deux=do
sabun=savon=soap
tofu=tahu
tandoor is all over Asia
air=water (oops)


So many words we share from before writing.
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