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Old 04-16-2014, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
Those sweet drinks are nothing compared to indonesian ice tea or malaysian teh tarik or thai milk tea ( cant remember the name), they tend to be extremely sugary, fruit juice in western country are always soury and not as sugared as those you find in indonesia.

I guest so but how sweet snacks and candies are usually varies regionally.
Yeah Thai iced tea in particular tends to be cloyingly sweet. You mean like Teh Botol? I didn't find it that sweet. Have you had southern sweet tea? That's probably sweeter. Bubble/milk pearl tea can be pretty sweet too. Maybe sour to your tastes (well orange juice always tends to be more sour than freshly squeezed) but they still add a ton of sugar. Bandung, which I'm sure you're familiar with, is also very sweet.
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Old 04-16-2014, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Yeah Thai iced tea in particular tends to be cloyingly sweet. You mean like Teh Botol? I didn't find it that sweet. Have you had southern sweet tea? That's probably sweeter. Bubble/milk pearl tea can be pretty sweet too. Maybe sour to your tastes (well orange juice always tends to be more sour than freshly squeezed) but they still add a ton of sugar. Bandung, which I'm sure you're familiar with, is also very sweet.
Teh botol is manufactured and have controlled amount of sugar put in, you should order "es teh manis" when you are indonesia or "es jeruk" in random warung or restaurant and see the amount of sugar they put in there, indonesian tend to serve drink in extreme sweetness. It also apply in their coffee drinking culture, the reason of this extreme sweetness culture in drinks is probably due to humidity (imagine the farmers working under the heat) and people need cheap quick energy replenishment.

Yes i find juices from western countries sour, compare the apple juice from Australia to Indonesian one and you will understand.
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Old 04-16-2014, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goshio22 View Post
Teh botol is manufactured and have controlled amount of sugar put in, you should order "es teh manis" when you are indonesia or "es jeruk" in random warung or restaurant and see the amount of sugar they put in there, indonesian tend to serve drink in extreme sweetness. It also apply in their coffee drinking culture, the reason of this extreme sweetness culture in drinks is probably due to humidity (imagine the farmers working under the heat) and people need cheap quick energy.

Yes i find juices from western countries sour, compare the apple juice from Australia to Indonesian one and you will understand.
Yeah I haven't had much tea in Indo restaurants, but I often order teh tarik in Malaysia and Singapore, along with bandung, if not tropical juices.

Yes, I notice Indonesians like their syrups a lot. I had a couple of Indonesian friends and it seems every time I went to their house they'd have some syrup mix to pour into drinks and fried chicken, always the fried chicken lol.

Well it depends...a lot of the 25% juice ones taste really sweet, they're mostly sugar and water anyway. Some of the Asian fruit 'juices' from the oriental store seem mostly like sugar and water. I would hardly consider mogu mogu fruit juice.

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Old 04-16-2014, 07:31 PM
 
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Traditional Korean sweets, known as han gwa, or hangwa, can be very sweet.

They are traditionally made with grain, suger syrup and honey and can be colorful.
They have been eaten in Korea since 1st century AD.




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Old 04-16-2014, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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^ that's cool, never seen that before. Some Chinese cookies are very sweet as well.
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Old 04-16-2014, 08:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Which desserts did you try? Thai desserts often feature coconut milk but not really dairy. I would a lot of their desserts are kind of starchy.
There are a lot of Thai desserts that taste great. One Thai dessert that's popular with Thais, but I don't care for, are those colorful jelly-like treats (they look like jello). The come in different colors. The ones I've tried taste pretty bland, but the kids like them.

Close Up Of Red Thai Jelly, Delicious Dessert Royalty Free Stock Photo, Pictures, Images And Stock Photography. Image 14470620.

Scroll down to Jelly/Custard/Gooey desserts. Look for Woon and Khanom Chun.
Thai Desserts (Khanom Wan Thai): The Ultimate Thailand Sweets Guide
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Old 04-16-2014, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
There are a lot of Thai desserts that taste great. One Thai dessert that's popular with Thais, but I don't care for, are those colorful jelly-like treats (they look like jello). The come in different colors. The ones I've tried taste pretty bland, but the kids like them.

Close Up Of Red Thai Jelly, Delicious Dessert Royalty Free Stock Photo, Pictures, Images And Stock Photography. Image 14470620.

Scroll down to Jelly/Custard/Gooey desserts. Look for Woon and Khanom Chun.
Thai Desserts (Khanom Wan Thai): The Ultimate Thailand Sweets Guide
Wow very extensive array! I'm most familiar with mango sticky rice when it comes to Thai desserts.
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Old 04-17-2014, 09:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Wow very extensive array! I'm most familiar with mango sticky rice when it comes to Thai desserts.
Mark is a food guy and has compiled quite a list of goodies. As you can guess, there's a lot more than he's listed. Durian is another item that's often used to make treats. Personally, I don't like durian at all. It's spicy pungent odor can be overwhelming to the nostrils that lingers for quite a while after consuming it. To me, it smells like something rotten that's been dead for a long time. It's so strong that some hotels prohibit them from being brought in. I've tried dried durian chips and have to say they aren't as bad in terms of smell or taste, although I still wouldn't put them on my favorite list of things to eat.

Another snack that's popular is some kind of dried shrimp. It's kind of a blend of sweet and salty. It too has a powerful scent. When my wife opens up a bag of it to snack on in the car, it makes the whole car stink. Even rolling the windows down doesn't help much, LOL.

There's a tiny mango, about the size of an olive, that makes a good snack. The seed is soft and small. The fruit is green and sour, and the texture is a bit crunchy like an apple. Adding a blended mix of sugar, salt and finely ground or powdered chili gives this treat an explosive sensation of flavors, salty, sweet, sour and spicy, that makes for an interesting taste experience. Each of these flavors stand out in a way that compliments each other. The mango is first dipped into a small bowl of the spice mix, then eaten.

This same mix is often provided in small packets by street vendors selling fresh pineapple, papaya and watermelon that's been cut into bite-sized pieces and eaten by using a bamboo spear (like the ones used for kabobs, grilled chicken, etc.).
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Old 04-18-2014, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,241,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Mark is a food guy and has compiled quite a list of goodies. As you can guess, there's a lot more than he's listed. Durian is another item that's often used to make treats. Personally, I don't like durian at all. It's spicy pungent odor can be overwhelming to the nostrils that lingers for quite a while after consuming it. To me, it smells like something rotten that's been dead for a long time. It's so strong that some hotels prohibit them from being brought in. I've tried dried durian chips and have to say they aren't as bad in terms of smell or taste, although I still wouldn't put them on my favorite list of things to eat.

Another snack that's popular is some kind of dried shrimp. It's kind of a blend of sweet and salty. It too has a powerful scent. When my wife opens up a bag of it to snack on in the car, it makes the whole car stink. Even rolling the windows down doesn't help much, LOL.

There's a tiny mango, about the size of an olive, that makes a good snack. The seed is soft and small. The fruit is green and sour, and the texture is a bit crunchy like an apple. Adding a blended mix of sugar, salt and finely ground or powdered chili gives this treat an explosive sensation of flavors, salty, sweet, sour and spicy, that makes for an interesting taste experience. Each of these flavors stand out in a way that compliments each other. The mango is first dipped into a small bowl of the spice mix, then eaten.

This same mix is often provided in small packets by street vendors selling fresh pineapple, papaya and watermelon that's been cut into bite-sized pieces and eaten by using a bamboo spear (like the ones used for kabobs, grilled chicken, etc.).
Andrew Zimmern from Bizarre Foods quite famously dislikes durian. Though exposed to it from a young age I wouldn't say I'm a big fan, for similar reasons - the texture, pungency - but I actually used to quite like durian candy, like a long brown sausage like candy thing made of durian paste, popular in Thailand and Malaysia. Another favourite of mine as a child (and still now, although it's calorific!) are koh kae peanuts, covered in like a coconut cream coating (there are different flavours now). Do you like that?

koh-kae.com

I'm not sure if I've had that mini-mango.

Indeed yes, a common street snack in Thailand.
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Old 04-18-2014, 07:53 PM
 
5,091 posts, read 8,067,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Andrew Zimmern from Bizarre Foods quite famously dislikes durian. Though exposed to it from a young age I wouldn't say I'm a big fan, for similar reasons - the texture, pungency - but I actually used to quite like durian candy, like a long brown sausage like candy thing made of durian paste, popular in Thailand and Malaysia. Another favourite of mine as a child (and still now, although it's calorific!) are koh kae peanuts, covered in like a coconut cream coating (there are different flavours now). Do you like that?

koh-kae.com

I'm not sure if I've had that mini-mango.

Indeed yes, a common street snack in Thailand.
Mini mango is a good description. Evidently they do ripen, although I've never see any ripe ones. Most folks I know pick them green and feel they're worthless if allowed to get ripe.
Meet the Mini Mango | Ramblingspoon.com
http://www.icis.com/blogs/icis-chemi...ngee-and-mini/

No, I've never eaten any kho kae peanuts.

About the durian, a lot of Thais like it, but I know there are plenty of Thais that don't like it at all. Nonthaburi (just north on BKK) is said to have some of the best durian, but that may become a thing of the past due to flooding. Apparently, durian plants can die from too much water. Nonthaburi even has cast iron durian street lamps and have held an annual Durian Festival.
S.E.A. Wandering | a place to document and share our travels to Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand

I wonder if this is the sausage like durian candy you mentioned. Fourth photo down.
Links to Food Blog: Lunar New Year Candy made from Kumquats and Durian
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