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View Poll Results: Which city has the best infrastructure
Shanghai 0 0%
Tokyo 7 77.78%
Seoul 2 22.22%
Voters: 9. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-01-2014, 07:31 AM
 
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the line 2 between PVG and city center takes about 1 hour. That is too much. The Maglev only connects PVG and Longyang station, which is still far from the central area.

It is quite painful to get from anywhere is Puxi to PVG, taking at least one hour. Hongqiao airport is much accessible, less than half an hour ride from downtown Puxi. But it has limited air routes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
The OP asked about infrastructure, not how people behave. You are mixing your personal feelings with fixed infrastructure. Let's leave the people aside. I agree transit at the train station confusing. People get lost frequently.

Haven't been to Seoul, but I am familiar with Shanghai and Tokyo enough. I would say Tokyo still has the edge. Its transit system although older, functions more efficiently. Althought being a larger city, Tokyo's subway is less crowded as well. Also, it doesn't solely depend on subway and there is a rather extensive rail system too. The signage system is excellent and it is always easy to find direction. On the other hand, a few exchange stations are awkward and you have to walk quite far. Otemachi is an example.

Narita airport is not as nice as Pudong. The N'ex train is super nice but too far away from Tokyo and costs too much (in the order of $20). I don't know why someone says there is no rapid transit between Shanghai and PVG. PVG is directly accessible via subway line 2, which takes you right to the city centre (Lujiazui, People's square, Jin'an Temple etc). You also have the option to take the maglev if interested.

Tokyo still leads because it had a much longer time to develope and mature. Shanghai is improving rapidly. They are installing restrooms, accessible entries, protective doors along the track etc. Easy access to high speed train completed with a matter of few years.

Shanghai still has plenty of room to improve, particularly on the details. For example, too often I find the bus drivers drive too recklessly. And a few times they close the door too soon (some seniors move slowly). All these need to be changed.

There are a lot of similarities between the two cities. Building form is similar although Tokyo doesn't have many skyscrapers. Both cities have quite a few major transit/commercial nodes where people congregated, instead of having one big downtown like north American cities. Line 4 in Shanghai is exactly the same as the Yamanote line (both ring lines with the same number of stops and distance). I am pretty sure Shanghai was taking Tokyo as an example when designing its subway system.

Compared with the systems in these cities, here in Toronto, the biggest city in a rich country, the transit system looks like it is from the 1980s. Trains incur problems every few days. No fare card (need to use archaic token for access). only two lines. Super expensive for not much coverage and service. I think developed countries are left behind.
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:44 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,669,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
the line 2 between PVG and city center takes about 1 hour. That is too much. The Maglev only connects PVG and Longyang station, which is still far from the central area.

It is quite painful to get from anywhere is Puxi to PVG, taking at least one hour. Hongqiao airport is much accessible, less than half an hour ride from downtown Puxi. But it has limited air routes.
All three cities have 2 airports, one which has more domestic/short-range flights, the other more international/long-range flights. PVG is already close enough to Lujiazui, a place where a lot of people in Shanghai go to. Incheon is pretty far, and Narita airport is even further from anything. Both Gimpo and Haneda airports are close to the city centers, like Hongqiao.
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:49 AM
 
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As of today, Tokyo.
In the future, Shanghai/Beijing
Never on the table, Seoul
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:54 AM
 
1,099 posts, read 1,669,514 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
The OP asked about infrastructure, not how people behave. You are mixing your personal feelings with fixed infrastructure. Let's leave the people aside. I agree transit at the train station confusing. People get lost frequently.

Haven't been to Seoul, but I am familiar with Shanghai and Tokyo enough. I would say Tokyo still has the edge. Its transit system although older, functions more efficiently. Althought being a larger city, Tokyo's subway is less crowded as well. Also, it doesn't solely depend on subway and there is a rather extensive rail system too. The signage system is excellent and it is always easy to find direction. On the other hand, a few exchange stations are awkward and you have to walk quite far. Otemachi is an example.

Narita airport is not as nice as Pudong. The N'ex train is super nice but too far away from Tokyo and costs too much (in the order of $20). I don't know why someone says there is no rapid transit between Shanghai and PVG. PVG is directly accessible via subway line 2, which takes you right to the city centre (Lujiazui, People's square, Jin'an Temple etc). You also have the option to take the maglev if interested.

Tokyo still leads because it had a much longer time to develope and mature. Shanghai is improving rapidly. They are installing restrooms, accessible entries, protective doors along the track etc. Easy access to high speed train completed with a matter of few years.

Shanghai still has plenty of room to improve, particularly on the details. For example, too often I find the bus drivers drive too recklessly. And a few times they close the door too soon (some seniors move slowly). All these need to be changed.

There are a lot of similarities between the two cities. Building form is similar although Tokyo doesn't have many skyscrapers. Both cities have quite a few major transit/commercial nodes where people congregated, instead of having one big downtown like north American cities. Line 4 in Shanghai is exactly the same as the Yamanote line (both ring lines with the same number of stops and distance). I am pretty sure Shanghai was taking Tokyo as an example when designing its subway system.

Compared with the systems in these cities, here in Toronto, the biggest city in a rich country, the transit system looks like it is from the 1980s. Trains incur problems every few days. No fare card (need to use archaic token for access). only two lines. Super expensive for not much coverage and service. I think developed countries are left behind.
Fine, if anything, Shanghai Railway Station is a disgrace because it is filthy! Hongqiao Railway Station is indeed much, much better. But Shanghai Railway Station is dirtier compared to Tokyo Station or Seoul Station. That is part of the evaluation of the infrastructure.
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:55 AM
 
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Lujiazui is not the center of Shanghai. The city center is people's square, which is across the river from Lujiazui.



Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
All three cities have 2 airports, one which has more domestic/short-range flights, the other more international/long-range flights. PVG is already close enough to Lujiazui, a place where a lot of people in Shanghai go to. Incheon is pretty far, and Narita airport is even further from anything. Both Gimpo and Haneda airports are close to the city centers, like Hongqiao.
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:57 AM
 
1,011 posts, read 628,757 times
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But you are comparing cleanliness. Admittedly, Japan is the cleanest place in the world.
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
Fine, if anything, Shanghai Railway Station is a disgrace because it is filthy! Hongqiao Railway Station is indeed much, much better. But Shanghai Railway Station is dirtier compared to Tokyo Station or Seoul Station. That is part of the evaluation of the infrastructure.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
Lujiazui is not the center of Shanghai. The city center is people's square, which is across the river from Lujiazui.
I know, but Lujiazui is still a major destination for a lot of people (some business travelers and tourists). With both Incheon and Narita airports, any main destinations are still even further, whether you go to Gangnam (which I would think is the Lujiazui equivalent in Seoul) or Shibuya (or Akasaka or anywhere worth going to in Tokyo really).
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:25 AM
 
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Which city is more pedestrian friendly? Shanghai has a lot of walkable streets, like the Nanjing road shopping area, and former french concession filled with bars and restuarants.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,244,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
Which city is more pedestrian friendly? Shanghai has a lot of walkable streets, like the Nanjing road shopping area, and former french concession filled with bars and restuarants.
I would guess all are, but all are also very large physically so idk...I haven't visited any of these but I will visit Tokyo in October. I've been to Beijing though.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:38 AM
 
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Shanghai is quite conveniently structured. It has 6 major CBD/shopping areas, with easy access by metro lines. In general , PUDONG is not as walkable as Puxi.

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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I would guess all are, but all are also very large physically so idk...I haven't visited any of these but I will visit Tokyo in October. I've been to Beijing though.
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