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Old 05-01-2014, 08:35 AM
 
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I believe with the rise of China in the world, people with Chinese heritage will be more eager to find back their roots.

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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Most Chinese Australians born here identify mostly as Australian, I think, although some will still cling to their Asian heritage. Whether or how well they speak Mandarin or other Chinese languages, how much Chinese food they eat, their knowledge of Chinese culture.etc will vary on upbringing/parents, personal proclivity, where they grew up.etc. I think Australia as a whole is getting more Asian, though, dumplings are a favourite for many people here in Melbourne.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
I believe with the rise of China in the world, people with Chinese heritage will be more eager to find back their roots.
Perhaps, for a long time, of course, Overseas Chinese communities were kind of isolated from the PRC itself.

I had the opportunity to visit Nan'an, my mother's ancestral village on the maternal side, near Quanzhou.

Apparently we have some distant relatives who are or were peanut farmers there.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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What is your background gen2010?
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:42 AM
 
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How big is the Chinese community in Australia? I know the population is huge, but do you have the large pockets of Chinese community like Flushing in NewYork. Or the chinese population is more spread out within the bigger metro areas.

If someone is raised in a Chinese community, it is difficult not to pick up the Chinese language.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Perhaps, for a long time, of course, Overseas Chinese communities were kind of isolated from the PRC itself.

I had the opportunity to visit Nan'an, my mother's ancestral village on the maternal side, near Quanzhou.

Apparently we have some distant relatives who are or were peanut farmers there.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:43 AM
 
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I am 100% chinese, but study in US and live in Europe

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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
What is your background gen2010?
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
How big is the Chinese community in Australia? I know the population is huge, but do you have the large pockets of Chinese community like Flushing in NewYork. Or the chinese population is more spread out within the bigger metro areas.

If someone is raised in a Chinese community, it is difficult not to pick up the Chinese language.
Chinese Australian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pretty large, although quite diverse. For instance, a lot of people on the census data from Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, even Indonesia are listed as of 'Chinese' ancestry. I'd say there were three major 'waves' of Chinese immigration if you like (if you refer to the Overseas Chinese as primary Chinese). Those that came during the 19th century to prospect for gold, start shops, work as labourers etc, usually single males. Many returned to China, but a few stayed on. Some brought wives from China, others married European women. This immigration was largely stopped by legislature, including the White Australia Policy, so Chinese immigration slowed to a trickle from say 1910 to the 1960s.

The second wave are those that came after the dismantling of the WAP...some of the Vietnamese boat people were technically Hoa, or Chinese Vietnamese, although they're more just considered Vietnamese here. Then there were those from Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia in the 70s-90s, many were quite well-educated, some professionals, such as my parents. Many were more westernised...there were some from Hong Kong and Taiwan which tended to be more Chinese of course. There was overlap, but the former seem to be less ghettoized, often living in wealthier suburbs.

The third wave are those from the PRC, Taiwan, from the 90s. Their influence is pervasive: go to Melbourne CBD now and you'll see countless Sichuan style restaurants, dumpling houses, bubble tea.etc. Box Hill used to be mostly Cantonese speaking but now it's mostly Mandarin, same with Chinatown.

Yes my area had a lot of South-East Asians (mostly Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore) as well as Indians, but not many Chinese from China. A lot of Malaysians and Singaporeans who come here are of course more westernised and just speak English.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
I am 100% chinese, but study in US and live in Europe
Interesting. Where in China? Where in Europe do you live?
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:16 AM
 
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I guess the mass immigration from the mainland is just the beginning. More parents from the mainland can afford overseas eduction for their kids. And a good percentage of these students will find a job there.

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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Chinese Australian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pretty large, although quite diverse. For instance, a lot of people on the census data from Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, even Indonesia are listed as of 'Chinese' ancestry. I'd say there were three major 'waves' of Chinese immigration if you like (if you refer to the Overseas Chinese as primary Chinese). Those that came during the 19th century to prospect for gold, start shops, work as labourers etc, usually single males. Many returned to China, but a few stayed on. Some brought wives from China, others married European women. This immigration was largely stopped by legislature, including the White Australia Policy, so Chinese immigration slowed to a trickle from say 1910 to the 1960s.

The second wave are those that came after the dismantling of the WAP...some of the Vietnamese boat people were technically Hoa, or Chinese Vietnamese, although they're more just considered Vietnamese here. Then there were those from Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia in the 70s-90s, many were quite well-educated, some professionals, such as my parents. Many were more westernised...there were some from Hong Kong and Taiwan which tended to be more Chinese of course. There was overlap, but the former seem to be less ghettoized, often living in wealthier suburbs.

The third wave are those from the PRC, Taiwan, from the 90s. Their influence is pervasive: go to Melbourne CBD now and you'll see countless Sichuan style restaurants, dumpling houses, bubble tea.etc. Box Hill used to be mostly Cantonese speaking but now it's mostly Mandarin, same with Chinatown.

Yes my area had a lot of South-East Asians (mostly Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore) as well as Indians, but not many Chinese from China. A lot of Malaysians and Singaporeans who come here are of course more westernised and just speak English.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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There are large Chinese enclaves, in Melbourne there's Box Hill, there are a few others, I'm not as familiar with them, I used to live in Footscray, which is a Vietnamese enclave but now there are more Chinese as well as Africans. Sydney has even more Chinese I think.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:24 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
No, I mean even after generations of immigrantion, overseas Chinese can still identify themselves as Chinese. But for those germans, italians who came to USA, they normally loose their own identities. You can see Chinatowns in all major cities in the world. It is interesting to see this phenominen. In US, they are forming even bigger Chinatowns, like San Gabriel valley in LA, Flushing in NYC, both like a medium size city.
There are several factors involved. One is that Chinese emigration was generally later so has had less time to lose its identity.

Another was that they emigrated mostly to ethnically quite different places so it's very visible that they are different--you'll see a lot higher degree of assimilation in Thailand for example than in the UK.

Another is that Chinese emigration is actually hitting a faster pace in recent decades than before (nearly an explosion as there are pretty compelling factors for some people to leave China) which is different for most other ethnicities, so it's the most visible whereas immigration from Germany and Italian hasn't been that big dropped severely for almost a century now. So what you see is a large and growing population of first generation immigrants who are not going to be all that assimilated--it'll generally take about three generations for that to happen on average.

There's also an observation bias at play here: you might meet random Los Angelenos who are something like an eighth Chinese from about three generations back, you'll never know it because they've assimilated pretty completely (this is especially prevalent within the older generation of Chinese Caribbeans)--and since you don't see that, you assume that they just don't assimilate.
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