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Old 05-01-2014, 08:48 PM
 
6,227 posts, read 6,375,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by singaporelady View Post
nah.. Chinese Singaporeans like myself are still literate in chinese.
In a country like Singapore which has a majority chinese presense yes, but in the other countries with less chinese, it can be vastly different
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:51 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 893,151 times
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I know non-Chinese people who celebrate Chinese New Year in California alongside their Chinese friends. Just like non-Germans who attend an Oktoberfest celebration and everyone's Irish on St. Patrick's day.

It's weird to be hung up over something and insist on something just because your ancestors did something and someone else's ancestors did something else and you must do what your ancestors did and not what someone else's ancestors did.

If anything, we should embrace cultural exchange and diversity, as society gets more modern and globalized. Doing something "only because your ancestors did it" is a backwards way of thinking. After all, none of our ancestors before industrial times used cell phones, checked the news online, had electricity or running water and ate refrigerated food shipped from far away or factory-made clothes from other countries.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,252,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Brazen_3133 View Post
In a country like Singapore which has a majority chinese presense yes, but in the other countries with less chinese, it can be vastly different
Yes, although one should remember most of the Singaporeans of Chinese ancestry are Hokkien, Hakka, Teochew, Cantonese, Hainanese speakers, not Mandarin, which was imposed on them in the 'speak Mandarin' campaign by Lee Kwan Yew's People's Action Party (PAP). A lot of it was political, trying to forge closer ties to the emerging PRC.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,252,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
I know non-Chinese people who celebrate Chinese New Year in California alongside their Chinese friends. Just like non-Germans who attend an Oktoberfest celebration and everyone's Irish on St. Patrick's day.

It's weird to be hung up over something and insist on something just because your ancestors did something and someone else's ancestors did something else and you must do what your ancestors did and not what someone else's ancestors did.

If anything, we should embrace cultural exchange and diversity, as society gets more modern and globalized. Doing something "only because your ancestors did it" is a backwards way of thinking. After all, none of our ancestors before industrial times used cell phones, checked the news online, had electricity or running water and ate refrigerated food shipped from far away or factory-made clothes from other countries.
That's why I feel that many Australians, Americans, Canadians in particular are multi-cultural, and ideas of ethnicity don't really apply to them. It's more ancestry. We eat Chinese dumplings, pizza, pasta, hamburgers, Indian food.etc respectively, and yes many non-Chinese enjoy watching lion dancing or something, just as Chinese living here might celebrate Christmas or Easter. Merely by what I eat I consider every culture my own, and also as just part of wider human culture.
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Old 05-02-2014, 02:09 AM
 
Location: singapore
1,526 posts, read 1,272,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
When I went back to S'pore to visit relatives, we did this tossing of some salad thing which I'd never even heard of before.
Actually that is what we call yusheng..
Uniquely done only by Chinese in Singapore and Malaysia.

This is not done in Hong Kong , Taiwan or china..
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Old 05-02-2014, 02:11 AM
 
1,011 posts, read 629,395 times
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why are you so against Mandarin? Mandarin is actually a very good thing for the entire Chinese community. Not only in Singapore, but in Mainland, in Taiwan, they all had a campaign to promote Mandarin. Can you imagine that a guy from Shanghai cannot communicate with a guy in BJ? Before the civil war, China is very backward, and people from different regions basically cannot understand each other. But with the rapid development and industrialisation, there need to be one unifying Spoken language that can be used across all regions in CHina.

Do you know that back then Chairman Mao and President of KMT Jiangjieshi speak a dialect that a lot of people cannot understand? Mao speaks Hunan Dialect, which I can only understand 30%. Jiangjieshi speaks a variation of Wu, which I cannot understand a word. If Mandarin is not adopted, do you think it is funny that a president of China is speaking something that a lot of his countrymen cannot understand?

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Yes, although one should remember most of the Singaporeans of Chinese ancestry are Hokkien, Hakka, Teochew, Cantonese, Hainanese speakers, not Mandarin, which was imposed on them in the 'speak Mandarin' campaign by Lee Kwan Yew's People's Action Party (PAP). A lot of it was political, trying to forge closer ties to the emerging PRC.
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Old 05-02-2014, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,252,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by singaporelady View Post
Actually that is what we call yusheng..
Uniquely done only by Chinese in Singapore and Malaysia.

This is not done in Hong Kong , Taiwan or china..
Yes that's it. I guess it's the only time I've ever properly celebrated CNY, actually it was after CNY but still, apart from the time I was invited by a Chinese friend (from Zhuhai, although her hometown was in Jiangsu province) to dinner where he had dumplings. I helped make the dumplings (and also brought along my own contribution of Sri Lankan style chicken curry to literally 'spice things up'). We put a coin in one dumpling, whoever got the coin would have good luck. I was actually hoping I didn't get it lest I choke on it or something lol. But yes, it's the start of the 'Spring festival' in China. I was a completely ignoramus about it, aside from a love of dumplings, and my perceptive friend just saw me as Australian I suppose.
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Old 05-02-2014, 02:38 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,252,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
why are you so against Mandarin? Mandarin is actually a very good thing for the entire Chinese community. Not only in Singapore, but in Mainland, in Taiwan, they all had a campaign to promote Mandarin. Can you imagine that a guy from Shanghai cannot communicate with a guy in BJ? Before the civil war, China is very backward, and people from different regions basically cannot understand each other. But with the rapid development and industrialisation, there need to be one unifying Spoken language that can be used across all regions in CHina.

Do you know that back then Chairman Mao and President of KMT Jiangjieshi speak a dialect that a lot of people cannot understand? Mao speaks Hunan Dialect, which I can only understand 30%. Jiangjieshi speaks a variation of Wu, which I cannot understand a word. If Mandarin is not adopted, do you think it is funny that a president of China is speaking something that a lot of his countrymen cannot understand?
Well I'm not against it, just against the way it's been kind of forced onto Singaporeans at the expense of their real mother dialects/native tongues. These rich languages and their culture are being lost because of a sort of imperialism, but I suppose that's how it is in many places. With Occitan in France for instance. I agree, of course a nation tends to require at least one common medium of communication, yet it seems Indian has fared quite well being multi-lingual. Of course any leader of China would have to be fluent in Putonghua. I just wish there was more 'dialect' consciousness in S'pore, but maybe it's too much to hope for, when kids are expected to be fluent in both Mandarin and English.
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Old 05-02-2014, 02:56 AM
 
1,011 posts, read 629,395 times
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Singapore is relatively small to have a good diversity in Chinese perhaps. It is already diverse, with Chinese, Malay, English, etc.

For most cities in Mainland, it is not too much an issue. Most local dialects are well preserved. In cities like Suzhou, wuxi, hangzhou, Wu is dominant. In Canton, Cantonese is still dominant. Actually, most Chinese are bi-lingual, in the sense that they can speak mandarin plus one local dialect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Well I'm not against it, just against the way it's been kind of forced onto Singaporeans at the expense of their real mother dialects/native tongues. These rich languages and their culture are being lost because of a sort of imperialism, but I suppose that's how it is in many places. With Occitan in France for instance. I agree, of course a nation tends to require at least one common medium of communication, yet it seems Indian has fared quite well being multi-lingual. Of course any leader of China would have to be fluent in Putonghua. I just wish there was more 'dialect' consciousness in S'pore, but maybe it's too much to hope for, when kids are expected to be fluent in both Mandarin and English.
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Old 05-02-2014, 03:10 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,252,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
Singapore is relatively small to have a good diversity in Chinese perhaps. It is already diverse, with Chinese, Malay, English, etc.

For most cities in Mainland, it is not too much an issue. Most local dialects are well preserved. In cities like Suzhou, wuxi, hangzhou, Wu is dominant. In Canton, Cantonese is still dominant. Actually, most Chinese are bi-lingual, in the sense that they can speak mandarin plus one local dialect.
Yes well I did hear some Min being spoken in Fujian. Most? Dunno about that...

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