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Old 05-01-2014, 07:16 AM
 
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There is estimated 50 million overseas chinese. It is interesting why Chinese tend to retain their distinct culture even after several generations after immigrantion in the host country.
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
There is estimated 50 million overseas chinese. It is interesting why Chinese tend to retain their distinct culture even after several generations after immigrantion in the host country.
It depends on where they reside. If they reside in US or European countries, they may want to have local citizenship. If in Southeast Asia/Africa, they may want to retain their Chinese citizenship. However, there are some exceptions like S. Africa/Brazil/Argentina/Mexico, where most Chinese get local citizenship and those countries are just "easy to make money."
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:36 AM
 
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No, I mean even after generations of immigrantion, overseas Chinese can still identify themselves as Chinese. But for those germans, italians who came to USA, they normally loose their own identities. You can see Chinatowns in all major cities in the world. It is interesting to see this phenominen. In US, they are forming even bigger Chinatowns, like San Gabriel valley in LA, Flushing in NYC, both like a medium size city.

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Originally Posted by xhgz View Post
It depends on where they reside. If they reside in US or European countries, they may want to have local citizenship. If in Southeast Asia/Africa, they may want to retain their Chinese citizenship. However, there are some exceptions like S. Africa/Brazil/Argentina/Mexico, where most Chinese get local citizenship and those countries are just "easy to make money."
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:39 AM
 
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I guess in the case of America, Canada and Australia, there is very little local culture, and even if there is, the Chinese think their own chinese is superior and therefore stick to it.

For example, can you even start to compare the diversity and sophistication of Chinese food with hamburgers and hotdogs? Can to compare thanksgiving and president days with all the traditional chinese holidays with thousands of years of history?

People choose something they think is better. Simple as that.

Also, no matter how many generations have passed and how "westernized" one thinks he is, in white people's eyes, they are always Chinese and will never be 100% American/Canadian/Australian.

American ice skater Michelle Kwan on many occasion had to say "she loves America" because no matter how many medals she won, America will always consider her as the "Asian girl". In the 2008 Beijing Olympic, a Vietnam Canadian won the first gold medal, but magazines like McLean put her at the bottom of the list when talking about medalists.

There is no point to trying to abandon one's Asian heritage/culture and pretend to be just "American" (or Canadian or whatever). You look different and you will always be viewed as the Asian guy.
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Old 05-01-2014, 07:48 AM
 
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Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
No, I mean even after generations of immigrantion, overseas Chinese can still identify themselves as Chinese. But for those germans, italians who came to USA, they normally loose their own identities. You can see Chinatowns in all major cities in the world. It is interesting to see this phenominen. In US, they are forming even bigger Chinatowns, like San Gabriel valley in LA, Flushing in NYC, both like a medium size city.

You'll argument is still fall into my explanation. It is still depending on where they reside. In a strong culture background like US/European countries, new generation believe that they are "American". I always hear tiger moms complain that their kids were bullied at school because some white kids usually want to bully those Asian kids because "You'll Chinese, you are not part of community, etc." Many second generation hate to have Asian mom/identity.

For Germans/Italians, please be advised that they are all white. Asian is a different race. It is a issue like Don Sterling mentioned in his audio. He simply speak the truth.

For Chinatown, Chinese prefer to live in a closed community especially when they have language barrier. However, citizenship of next generation is still depending on where they reside.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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I started a similar thread comparing the level integration of the so-called 'Overseas Chinese' in each country but it was deleted by the mod.

I would say it depends on many factors. The first is of course the country: how accepting they are, how much they encourage integration.etc. The second is the nature of the immigration: in Malaysia and Indonesia, for instance, many single male workers/immigrants would marry local women, the Baba/Nyonyas of the Peranakan or 'Straits Chinese' a unique culture fusing Chinese, Malay, European influences. There are many others. But yes, there is certainly a contrast between how integrated they were in say Thailand vs Malaysia. In Thailand there was more pressure to assimilate, so much so most ethnic Thai Chinese are just Thai now. Whereas in Malaysia colonial policies sort of separated the 'races', and thus communities where Chinese culture - language, religion, food to an extent, clan structures, celebrations remain strong in Malaysia.

The West is a different situation. Speaking of myself, my father is from Penang and my mother from Singapore. My ancestors have lived in Malaysia and Singapore for at least 3-4 generations. On my mother's side, her grandparents came from China in the early 20th century, and were quite traditional. My grandmother speaks only Hokkien and practises Buddhism/Chinese religion, and has a pretty Chinese mindset. My mother, in contrast, grew up in Singapore, where western culture and English were prevalent. From an early age she began speaking English, which was taught in school, went to church and became a Christian, and related as much to western culture as eastern. Singapore really was where east and west met at the time. My father had a similar experience, although being relatively wealthy ( compared to my mother's family) he had a more globalised lifestyle. He was also English educated, lived in NZ and the UK for many years, before returning to Malaysia and meeting my mother.

After moving to Australia of course we just thought of ourselves as Australian, the main difference was appearance, which we were sometimes reminded of. We spoke only English at home, I only speak English, although my mum knows Mandarin, English is her main language, same with my dad. My mum cooked both Asian and Western food. We didn't really celebrate any Chinese customs: although my parents did give us 'ang pao' or red packets during CNY. But yes, being in Australia I suppose Christmas and Easter were more significant.

So in terms of Chinese identity, I used to find it weird to think of myself as 'Chinese'. For me, it's more about ancestry rather than any living culture, although I appreciate Chinese food (some of it) more than I used to. My palate was and probably in some ways is still more western.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xhgz View Post
You'll argument is still fall into my explanation. It is still depending on where they reside. In a strong culture background like US/European countries, new generation believe that they are "American". I always hear tiger moms complain that their kids were bullied at school because some white kids usually want to bully those Asian kids because "You'll Chinese, you are not part of community, etc." Many second generation hate to have Asian mom/identity.

For Germans/Italians, please be advised that they are all white. Asian is a different race. It is a issue like Don Sterling mentioned in his audio. He simply speak the truth.

For Chinatown, Chinese prefer to live in a closed community especially when they have language barrier. However, citizenship of next generation is still depending on where they reside.
Most Chinese Australians born here identify mostly as Australian, I think, although some will still cling to their Asian heritage. Whether or how well they speak Mandarin or other Chinese languages, how much Chinese food they eat, their knowledge of Chinese culture.etc will vary on upbringing/parents, personal proclivity, where they grew up.etc. I think Australia as a whole is getting more Asian, though, dumplings are a favourite for many people here in Melbourne.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:18 AM
 
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Language is the most important. If you don't speak Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese, Minnan, whatever Chinese), it is difficult to identify oneself as Chinese.

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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
Most Chinese Australians born here identify mostly as Australian, I think, although some will still cling to their Asian heritage. Whether or how well they speak Mandarin or other Chinese languages, how much Chinese food they eat, their knowledge of Chinese culture.etc will vary on upbringing/parents, personal proclivity, where they grew up.etc. I think Australia as a whole is getting more Asian, though, dumplings are a favourite for many people here in Melbourne.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by gen2010 View Post
Language is the most important. If you don't speak Chinese (Mandarin, Cantonese, Minnan, whatever Chinese), it is difficult to identify oneself as Chinese.
Yes. My Chinese friend said I wasn't Chinese, although my parents used to remind us that we were Chinese. TBH as a kid I almost felt ashamed of being Asian, I guess kids don't wanna stand out. I mean I wasn't bullied much for it, but I was called names. I guess I related more to Singapore-Malaysia than China per se, like I prefer curry chicken, roti canai and things like that. But yeah, I think because of language and other reasons I can't claim myself as truly Chinese, even if I'm not longer ashamed of my Asian side, indeed I'm more interested in my ancestry, even if it has no real bearing on my culture. I'm basically a westerner or a 'banana' as some might say lol.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:33 AM
 
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I would imagine in 20 years, some metros in Canada and Australia will have Chinese as majority. Something interesting to observe.
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