U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 05-11-2014, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,280,333 times
Reputation: 2833

Advertisements

I find these three examples pretty interesting. While they do share many similarities, many people see India and China as quite different, physically, culturally.etc, so I suppose it's always a surprise to some to see cross cultural experiences between the two. For instance, Chinese Indians, or Indian Chinese/Hong Kongers, or those who have adopted aspects of the other culture:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbxPnq8OZqs


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgpaDXwScOk


Meiyang Chang is an Indian of Chinese descent who is well known as a singer, actor, host.etc. Of course, there should be nothing unusual about him since he was born and raised in India, but I guess there's a 'disconnect' from what we're used to. Regardless of his ancestry he appears very talented.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7AB617pXEkw

This girl was adopted by a Malaysian Chinese family, and is culturally Chinese, being most comfortable speaking Mandarin. I think it's pretty cool, really. I would love to hear her tell her story, like experiences growing up and stuff.

Speaking of Malaysia, it's a cultural melting pot where 'Chindians' are not too uncommon:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuAjvLf1agg

This couple is interesting because they are both Malaysian 'Chindians' who by chance met each other in Australia and were from the same town or something. Growing up in Malaysia, which is quite segregated by 'race', Chinese-Indian Malaysians have a rather unique experience.

Many Singaporeans, of course, are familiar with both Chinese and Indian culture. Many Chinese Singaporeans enjoy Indian food, festivals, movies, TV, and vice versa. Singlish is spoken by all.

 
Old 05-12-2014, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,280,333 times
Reputation: 2833
This is quite revealing, about identity, in Malaysia:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpY2D5lDbew

I wonder how much East Asians are interested in India or South Asia and it's culture? Like I lived in a very Vietnamese area, and I noticed every time I went to Indian restaurants they were almost empty, never saw a Vietnamese or Chinese person in them. Do most Viets just not like Indian food?
 
Old 05-12-2014, 12:05 AM
 
Location: singapore
1,534 posts, read 1,275,709 times
Reputation: 426
Singapore's Deputy PM Tharman's wife is mixed Chinese-Japanese if i am not wrong...
 
Old 05-12-2014, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,280,333 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by singaporelady View Post
Singapore's Deputy PM Tharman's wife is mixed Chinese-Japanese if i am not wrong...
Yes, I've met some Chindians IRL too. I'd love to date a Chindian girl, or Indian girl haha...
 
Old 05-12-2014, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Jersey
2,301 posts, read 3,403,448 times
Reputation: 2039
Go to any central NJ suburb, and you'll find tons of Chinese and Indian families living next to each other. Just about all of the birthday parties for my nephews and nieces in the area had a large proportion of kids who were Chinese at them. One of my cousins married a guy who's Chinese. He's a pretty awesome guy, and he sincerely respects Hinduism/Indian culture. I absolutely love the guy.

However, I'm not too fond of his father. He doesn't really give a crap about keeping the utensils for vegetarian and non-veg stuff separate and has caused more than his fair share of awkward moments. The only saving grace is that his behavior seems to stem from apathetic ignorance rather than a desire to offend.

Last edited by TylerJAX; 05-12-2014 at 04:50 PM..
 
Old 05-12-2014, 05:46 PM
 
6,275 posts, read 6,402,376 times
Reputation: 2883
Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerJAX View Post
Go to any central NJ suburb, and you'll find tons of Chinese and Indian families living next to each other. Just about all of the birthday parties for my nephews and nieces in the area had a large proportion of kids who were Chinese at them. One of my cousins married a guy who's Chinese. He's a pretty awesome guy, and he sincerely respects Hinduism/Indian culture. I absolutely love the guy.

However, I'm not too fond of his father. He doesn't really give a crap about keeping the utensils for vegetarian and non-veg stuff separate and has caused more than his fair share of awkward moments. The only saving grace is that his behavior seems to stem from apathetic ignorance rather than a desire to offend.
Haha LOL,

Are you talking about the town of Edison and those places close to Rutgers U? When I was in HS, planning on becoming an engineer, I wanted to go to Rutgers. Everyone said that the entire department there, faculty, and student body, was South Asian, or East Asian, or South East Asian LOLZ.

I can see why central jerz is so diverse.

Have the chinese mixed more than any other race? In Jamaica, they have mixed with the africans. In Peru, they have mixed with the locals. In NYC they have mixed with the Jews. In South East Asia, they have mixed with the indigenous.
 
Old 05-12-2014, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Jersey
2,301 posts, read 3,403,448 times
Reputation: 2039
Chinese/Indian wedding


Malaysian indian chinese wedding cinematic video Kelvin & Vemala Royale Bintang seremban - YouTube
 
Old 05-12-2014, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,280,333 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerJAX View Post
Go to any central NJ suburb, and you'll find tons of Chinese and Indian families living next to each other. Just about all of the birthday parties for my nephews and nieces in the area had a large proportion of kids who were Chinese at them. One of my cousins married a guy who's Chinese. He's a pretty awesome guy, and he sincerely respects Hinduism/Indian culture. I absolutely love the guy.

However, I'm not too fond of his father. He doesn't really give a crap about keeping the utensils for vegetarian and non-veg stuff separate and has caused more than his fair share of awkward moments. The only saving grace is that his behavior seems to stem from apathetic ignorance rather than a desire to offend.
That's cool to hear, are they both American? Or from India and China?

Many of my friends growing up were actually Indian Malaysians/Singaporeans, a lot of Malaysians in general in my school.
 
Old 05-13-2014, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,783 posts, read 13,379,062 times
Reputation: 11313
Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerJAX View Post
Go to any central NJ suburb, and you'll find tons of Chinese and Indian families living next to each other. Just about all of the birthday parties for my nephews and nieces in the area had a large proportion of kids who were Chinese at them. One of my cousins married a guy who's Chinese. He's a pretty awesome guy, and he sincerely respects Hinduism/Indian culture. I absolutely love the guy.

However, I'm not too fond of his father. He doesn't really give a crap about keeping the utensils for vegetarian and non-veg stuff separate and has caused more than his fair share of awkward moments. The only saving grace is that his behavior seems to stem from apathetic ignorance rather than a desire to offend.
You see that a lot in the Bay Area suburbs, too; areas like Mountain View, Millbrae, Colma, Concord, etc. My ex-wife was Northern Indian/Pakistani, and when we through her nephew's birthday party, it was a mostly even split of Chinese and IndoPak with a few white kids.

I've heard older folks, either immigrant or first-generation from both regions say pretty negative things rooted in stereotypes about the other, but younger folks, kids, and second-generation on seem to realize how much thry have in common since they grew up and live next to eachother. I'd still say that Indian-Chinese relationships in the Bay Area are less common but you still see them and I think it's only slated to become more common over time.

There are many Indians in the Taojin area of Guangzhou, where I work, and also Indian shops and restaurants. Most of them are engaged in business and do fairly well. I've seen a couple Chinese-Indian couples here but I've gathered from hanging out with Indian guys here that most of them are married and have families back home, if not here. The younger guys who aren't married still plan to meet a girl back home after they cash in and move back.
 
Old 05-13-2014, 12:53 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,280,333 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
You see that a lot in the Bay Area suburbs, too; areas like Mountain View, Millbrae, Colma, Concord, etc. My ex-wife was Northern Indian/Pakistani, and when we through her nephew's birthday party, it was a mostly even split of Chinese and IndoPak with a few white kids.

I've heard older folks, either immigrant or first-generation from both regions say pretty negative things rooted in stereotypes about the other, but younger folks, kids, and second-generation on seem to realize how much thry have in common since they grew up and live next to eachother. I'd still say that Indian-Chinese relationships in the Bay Area are less common but you still see them and I think it's only slated to become more common over time.

There are many Indians in the Taojin area of Guangzhou, where I work, and also Indian shops and restaurants. Most of them are engaged in business and do fairly well. I've seen a couple Chinese-Indian couples here but I've gathered from hanging out with Indian guys here that most of them are married and have families back home, if not here. The younger guys who aren't married still plan to meet a girl back home after they cash in and move back.
Actually the 'nerdy' group I hung out with in school was at least half Indian or Chinese, well a lot were actually Chinese Malaysians and Singaporeans, and a lot of the Indians were Malaysian and Singaporeans too. One of my best friends in primary school was too. I remember well going to his house, his mum cooking Indian food.etc. He was more westernised though, had an English given name etc. In Singapore and Malaysia Chinese and Indians sometimes interact more due to the religion thing. In Malaysia marrying a Muslim can be problematic: one must convert (at least legally), and be subject to laws pertaining to Bumiputras.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top