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Old 08-12-2014, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,951 posts, read 36,191,166 times
Reputation: 9489

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Quote:
Originally Posted by macjr82 View Post
But many have. Ethnic Bahraini's are the minority, on top of citizens themselves being a minority. I think less than have of the people here are citizens, and only about a third are ethnic Bahraini. Lots of ex-pats, let alone the contractor/military types. There is also a willingness among the Bharaini's to marry outisde of their culture. I know a black American ex-pat who is married to a Bahraini. A white-hispanic American military men, who technically works in Saudi now, but met his girlfriend/fiance' while stationed in Bahrain, whose girlfriend is Bahraini, with an Arab father and Filipino mother. I'm about ot go have coffee with a Lebanese teacher who also started her own business here. So though personally you can't, it seems many people can.
Own Land and gain Citizenship?

I've never heard of this anywhere in the Middle East, and a quick research brings up these threads immediately...

Bahrain Guide: Citizenship, Is it possible to become a national of Bahrain?: As a foreigner, you won

bahrain citizenship?

It sounds like it's completely impossible, unless someone in the marriage is Bahraini, and then it's possible for a foreigner, but even that doesn't guarantee.

I'm not seeing anywhere online that Joe Smith from Omaha, Nebraska can move to Bahrain with his family, buy a little desert sand, and start voting.
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Old 08-12-2014, 12:21 PM
 
914 posts, read 552,660 times
Reputation: 849
One would think that Tokyo would be in the top 5 at least. Leaving aside the numbers of foreigners the Japanese themselves are more "multicultural", or at least more Westernized, than other Asians. Just read any Murakami novel - most of the characters seem to make their own pasta and potato salad. There's also the people from their South American diaspora.
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Old 08-12-2014, 03:11 PM
 
3,071 posts, read 7,826,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Own Land and gain Citizenship?

I've never heard of this anywhere in the Middle East, and a quick research brings up these threads immediately...

Bahrain Guide: Citizenship, Is it possible to become a national of Bahrain?: As a foreigner, you won

bahrain citizenship?

It sounds like it's completely impossible, unless someone in the marriage is Bahraini, and then it's possible for a foreigner, but even that doesn't guarantee.

I'm not seeing anywhere online that Joe Smith from Omaha, Nebraska can move to Bahrain with his family, buy a little desert sand, and start voting.

You're putting words in my mouth. I was referring to your statement of saying you would be unable to put down roots. I'm saying many have. If "putting down roots" for you means owning land and gaining citizenship, that is one thing, but that was not stated in your previous post.

That said, the articles and link you posted predate the creation of Amwaj Island. Hell the Island is till under construction really. Buildings are still being put up and retail space is still being filled. You can purchase property there 100% freehold and with the purchase of that property you become eligible to apply for a residency visa for you and your family. Which are not easy to come by in the Arab world.
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Old 08-12-2014, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,951 posts, read 36,191,166 times
Reputation: 9489
Quote:
Originally Posted by mkwensky View Post
One would think that Tokyo would be in the top 5 at least. Leaving aside the numbers of foreigners the Japanese themselves are more "multicultural", or at least more Westernized, than other Asians. Just read any Murakami novel - most of the characters seem to make their own pasta and potato salad. There's also the people from their South American diaspora.
I would agree with that. I lived in Japan for 5-6 years, and they get the most criticism, but I always felt that Japan at least had that element there. The Brazilian and Peruvian diaspora in particular.
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Old 08-12-2014, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,951 posts, read 36,191,166 times
Reputation: 9489
Quote:
Originally Posted by macjr82 View Post
You're putting words in my mouth. I was referring to your statement of saying you would be unable to put down roots. I'm saying many have. If "putting down roots" for you means owning land and gaining citizenship, that is one thing, but that was not stated in your previous post.

That said, the articles and link you posted predate the creation of Amwaj Island. Hell the Island is till under construction really. Buildings are still being put up and retail space is still being filled. You can purchase property there 100% freehold and with the purchase of that property you become eligible to apply for a residency visa for you and your family. Which are not easy to come by in the Arab world.
Sorry, if I put words in your mouth.

Previously I was posting how it was almost impossible Asia, for a non-Asian person to become landowners and gain citizenship rights, despite that pretty much every country in Asia has tons of non-Asian foreigners who 'live in' these countries.

I assumed you were stating that Bahrain was the exception to this rule. I didn't realize you were stating it was typical of this same rule.

But, anyways, what generally happens in these countries, that allow foreigners to buy property. Is that they can just as easily lose their rights and property as well. From my understanding, some of the Gulf countries are loaded up with foreigners, who were able to buy houses, get credit cards, and then lost their job, which meant they lost their work visa, and had to leave the country the next day under the law, despite owning property. I've even heard a few, hopefully rare situations, where foreigners were put into debtor's prisons, as they owe all this money for the house/condo, and without the work visa, they can't legally stay in the country, but since they have debt, they can't actually leave the country either. In short, it's a complete mess.
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Old 08-13-2014, 04:24 AM
 
3,071 posts, read 7,826,131 times
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That's what makes Amwaj unique with the 100% freehold and allowing to apply for a residency visa, not just a work visa. In fact, to avoid this type of situation. That is what makes it so innovative and unique for the AO. Also, In Bahrain when applying for the residency Visa, you must have minimum 500BD of income that does not come from public or private sector Bahraini company, another measure to not put people in the same scenario work visas do.
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Old 08-15-2014, 12:53 AM
 
10 posts, read 9,104 times
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Singapore and Dubai definitely with large number of foreigners
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Old 08-16-2014, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,451,133 times
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Probably Bangkok if you only count Khao San Road.
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Old 08-16-2014, 12:47 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,428 posts, read 12,433,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
Probably Bangkok if you only count Khao San Road.
I think it would still win if you counted Soi Cowboy, Nana Plaza and Patpong too
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Old 08-16-2014, 09:33 AM
 
3,071 posts, read 7,826,131 times
Reputation: 2068
I'd never have guessed it before living here, but Manama deserves to be mentioned
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