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Old 09-18-2014, 03:39 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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I generally find the opposite to be true overall, but both to be pretty similar in terms of how quickly it varies from person to person or social group to social group.
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Old 09-18-2014, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Not true. People in "communist countries" are the most interested in politics.
Young generation in China is much less interested than the older.
I guess we disagree. Younger Asians will blog anonymously on politics, but that is about it. Older folks will gossip on politics, but that is it. When it comes to public actions and defined stances, one tends to hear crickets. There are a few exceptions here and there. But economic and educational survival are 1a and 1b, respectively. Politics are way down the list.
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Old 09-18-2014, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Not true. People in "communist countries" are the most interested in politics.
Young generation in China is much less interested than the older.
I guess we disagree. Younger Asians will blog anonymously on politics, but that is about it. Older folks will gossip on politics, but that is it. When it comes to public actions and defined stances, one tends to hear crickets. There are a few exceptions here and there. But economic and educational survival are 1a and 1b, respectively. Politics are way down the list.
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Old 09-18-2014, 09:06 PM
 
6,727 posts, read 6,617,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandpointian View Post
I guess we disagree. Younger Asians will blog anonymously on politics, but that is about it. Older folks will gossip on politics, but that is it. When it comes to public actions and defined stances, one tends to hear crickets. There are a few exceptions here and there. But economic and educational survival are 1a and 1b, respectively. Politics are way down the list.
In "communist countries", following politics is a part of life, often required.
Students were tested on news too (not sure if they still do that).

Of course, they don't protest like Americans.
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Old 09-18-2014, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
In "communist countries", following politics is a part of life, often required.
Students were tested on news too (not sure if they still do that).
That's called propoganda.

True political discussion won't have 'tests' on the nightly news, just to be sure you've taken to heart the gov't message.
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Old 09-19-2014, 01:34 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
That's called propoganda.

True political discussion won't have 'tests' on the nightly news, just to be sure you've taken to heart the gov't message.
No. The test was like: where was the Asian Olympic Games held this year? Who is the new president of France? In which province did the major earth quake occur?
All just filling in blanks, no essay questions.
I used to have that in middle school, but only once in a semester and only 10 points in the "politics" class.

College entrance exam for arts students and national exam for graduate students have that too. Probably around 10 points also.
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Old 09-19-2014, 10:34 AM
 
Location: NYC
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Perhaps in China's case, being so passionately involved gives the illusion of having some influence on the direction of the country, kind of like being an avid sports fan.
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Old 09-19-2014, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandpointian View Post
No one is more politically apathetic than Asians, largely because democracy remains in its infancy there and people are afraid of public stances.

A large number of American college students are there to party hard and enjoy the opposite sex. You ought not place any weight on studies of that demographic.

S.

You can't say that about Taiwan, where the populace is very well engaged in politics - a big change from the martial law days. Election turnout is around 80%, which far exceeds the turnout in the USA.
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Old 09-19-2014, 07:53 PM
 
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My experience from China is that people do not care much at all. It doesn't matter if I talk about domestic or international issues. It is not because they don't want to talk to me about it, because they lack knowledge too. In my experience 9 out of 10 are totally apathetic, 5% just spout the party line but will leave if you try to question their views, the last 5% are willing to discuss politics but most of them have no strong opinions.

I don't have too much experience from Taiwan but when I mentioned politics to a Taiwanese, then he started talking about how much he disliked KMT because they want to get closer to China.
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Old 09-19-2014, 08:04 PM
 
3,123 posts, read 2,706,795 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
In "communist countries", following politics is a part of life, often required.
Students were tested on news too (not sure if they still do that).

Of course, they don't protest like Americans.
I am not sure what you mean by following politics. Most Chinese people listen to the news each day, but few actively seek up information. Hence they will know the existence of Obama or even Hollande, but they don't know much about them.

And people listen to the news in western countries too. In America its very focused on domestic events, but in Europe it is not.
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