U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-18-2014, 05:18 PM
 
448 posts, read 499,256 times
Reputation: 170

Advertisements

How is that different from cold Northeast China or Beijing which also have heavy snowfalls?
In Northeast China, like in Russia, people are into alcohols too.
Anyway, cold places are very boring I agree.

Is it hard to move back to China after moving overseas? Is the China ID card cancelled after moving?
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeremyLee View Post
Me think the opposite. I came from China to Canada since I was 19 years old and my life just turned into a cold, boring and hard corner. Now i'm 24 and if I ever get a chance going back, i'm going back. My English has been pretty good through these years spent in Canada and I don't find it so hard immersing myself into western culture. However the more I'm blended in the more I feel that I'm not a part of it. People love nightlife here in Canada especially by hanging in bars and clubs. I just personally find it annoying and noisy to be in those places and I need to be sober to think. Additionally, the freaking cold weather and long depressing winter just drive me crazy. All the stores are closed around 5 or 6. People lingering in late night are practically drunk ones and crazy ones. Food is so not my type probably because I'm Chinese. The metropolitan area is so small and there's no where to go except for a couple of boring streets. It's Montreal!! All of my white friends find it fascinating, while I literally hate it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-25-2014, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Land of the Free*
139 posts, read 224,637 times
Reputation: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I think there is a 'face' thing in the U.S. too. It is NOT easy to be in the U.S. and just going out asking for dates, without some enormous embarrassment and awkwardness involved.
That's why we get so pissfaced drunk before doing it.












Or...at least I do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2014, 09:12 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,255,922 times
Reputation: 7578
Funny that people complain about China being boring.

I guess it is nothing but cultural difference in terms of what people consider "fun". As far as I know, 95% of Chinese students in the US would consider the US as an extremely boring country.

Except for a few major metropolis, the vast majority of America is dominated by the homogeneous suburbs and low rise single family homes with a tiny downtown which has some stores (mostly chain) and restaurants (many of which are chain too).

New York City is the only city that come close to what most Chinese people consider busy, vibrant and happening cities. Places like Boston and San Francisco are considered "small cities" as a matter of fact. Cities like Seattle and Vancouver look half dead and can hardly pass as cities.

In most American cities, stores close at 6pm, sometimes 5pm on weekends, and don't open until 11am (or 12pm). This is unimaginable in China where stores usually open between 10 and 9/10pm.

And this coupled with the fact that most American downtowns are not that safe (and very small) which means it is not wise to being walking on the streets with a few friends at night (instead of being in a car).

I am not saying American cities are bad, they are just not as vibrant and most Chinese young people prefer (or are used to) a more urban lifestyle, while America doesn't really offer much of that and its advantage lies in offering much better access to the nature outside the city.

If someone loves exploring the nature, enjoying doing things like hiking, swimming etc, then America is an ideal place for them, on the other hand, if someone enjoys cities more and likes shopping, restaurants, plus all the activities they do in Asian cities (karaokay, playing cards etc) America appears excruciatingly boring.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2014, 09:18 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,255,922 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by lokeung) View Post
How is that different from cold Northeast China or Beijing which also have heavy snowfalls?
In Northeast China, like in Russia, people are into alcohols too.
Anyway, cold places are very boring I agree.

Is it hard to move back to China after moving overseas? Is the China ID card cancelled after moving?
except most Chinese don't live in the cold northeast. The three northwest Chinese province has less than 10% of China's total population.

And the snow fall in Beijing is not comparable to Canadian cities at all. Let me give you some stats in terms of average annual snowfalls (many seem to think Beijing has a lot of snow, it doesn't) and it is from the Canadian government sources

Toronto: 115 cm
Montreal: 218 cm
Vancouver: 48 cm
Calgary: 127 cm
Ottawa: 236 cm

Beijing: 30 cm.

Yes, right, Beijing has less snow than Vancouver, which is almost considered a snow free city in Canada.

Weather conditions in capital and major cities (Precipitation)

Additionally, Beijing is a cold city only in the Chinese context and winter is very short compared with Canadian cities. Average April temperature in Beijing is 8-20 C, compared with 4-11C in Toronto or (entire southern Ontario) and Montreal.

Even Vancouver, which is supposed to have an early spring, has a average high of 13C in April. In fact, no where in Canada April is as warm as Beijing.

Last edited by botticelli; 10-26-2014 at 09:26 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2014, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,118,153 times
Reputation: 4565
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
except most Chinese don't live in the cold northeast. The three northwest Chinese province has less than 10% of China's total population.
That's like...a lot. 10% of China's population is about the size of population of entire Russia. Lol.

Anyway Beijing is super cold, but it doesn't snow a lot. Mostly because that part of China doesn't have much rainfull. The humidity is quite low.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2014, 12:36 PM
 
268 posts, read 324,264 times
Reputation: 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Funny that people complain about China being boring.

I guess it is nothing but cultural difference in terms of what people consider "fun". As far as I know, 95% of Chinese students in the US would consider the US as an extremely boring country.

Except for a few major metropolis, the vast majority of America is dominated by the homogeneous suburbs and low rise single family homes with a tiny downtown which has some stores (mostly chain) and restaurants (many of which are chain too).

New York City is the only city that come close to what most Chinese people consider busy, vibrant and happening cities. Places like Boston and San Francisco are considered "small cities" as a matter of fact. Cities like Seattle and Vancouver look half dead and can hardly pass as cities.

In most American cities, stores close at 6pm, sometimes 5pm on weekends, and don't open until 11am (or 12pm). This is unimaginable in China where stores usually open between 10 and 9/10pm.

And this coupled with the fact that most American downtowns are not that safe (and very small) which means it is not wise to being walking on the streets with a few friends at night (instead of being in a car).

I am not saying American cities are bad, they are just not as vibrant and most Chinese young people prefer (or are used to) a more urban lifestyle, while America doesn't really offer much of that and its advantage lies in offering much better access to the nature outside the city.

If someone loves exploring the nature, enjoying doing things like hiking, swimming etc, then America is an ideal place for them, on the other hand, if someone enjoys cities more and likes shopping, restaurants, plus all the activities they do in Asian cities (karaokay, playing cards etc) America appears excruciatingly boring.
Yeah, pretty much this.

I've been back in the US for over a year now after living in China for several, and I think I've accepted the fact that life here will never be quite the same. Outside of last years New Years celebrations, I've pretty much been in a slump of boredom. In China, I don't believe there was a weekend I did not go out and do something, be it a club, bar, or otherwise. There was always something going on. Even during the weekdays, there were events that people would go to after work. I'd occasionally hit up karaoke, go to a local pub for some games. Sometimes I'd just wander the streets looking at different shops and interacting with people as there were always people out and about.

People in the U.S., especially those living in suburbs, don't really go out that often - at least the ones I know. It's basically go to work, then go home. When the weekend comes you just kind of be a recluse in your house until Monday morning. While I don't think there's anything wrong with that per se, it's definitely not my lifestyle.

If you are into clubs, you'll notice that Chinese ones are basically packed every day of the week, and stay open until 4am. Clubs in the U.S. are typically Thurs-Sat, close at 1-2am, and stop serving drinks at 12. Granted, the atmosphere of a packed club in China vs. the U.S. is completely different. Chinese are more prone to sit and watch, while we Americans will actually dance the entire time.

I've expressed interest in living downtown in multiple cities in the States, and repeatedly people mention that not a lot goes on in the downtown areas, and that the level of crime makes it an undesirable place to "hang out". The "happening" locations are somehow outside of the city center, in the suburbs. The lack of public transportation, however, makes things 100x worse. In China, it is feasible to go out by yourself for a drink or two and be social. In most U.S. cities it's impossible without forking over a lot money for a taxi, or risking a DUI. Not to mention the fact that many cities are so spread out, and people just don't want to drive X amount of miles to get somewhere.

I think we have a more diverse offering of things to do in the U.S., but they're few and far between, and you have to go out of your way to find/enjoy them. In China, I think it can feel a bit boring at times, but exciting things always seem to find their way to you at some point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2014, 04:59 PM
 
6,725 posts, read 6,601,290 times
Reputation: 2386
Americans stay with their family a lot (I mean the married ones).
Married Chinese spend much more time with friends and relatives.
Probably Americans spend too much time on the road.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2014, 08:14 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,255,922 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
That's like...a lot. 10% of China's population is about the size of population of entire Russia. Lol.

Anyway Beijing is super cold, but it doesn't snow a lot. Mostly because that part of China doesn't have much rainfull. The humidity is quite low.
yep, that's about 110 million people, three times of Canada's population on a land of 780,000 sq km.

Beijing may be cold in the deep winter, but it is Canada we are comparing here. Beijing would be considered to have a mild winter and an exceptional early spring in the Canadian context. It is not only warmer than Toronto, which is considered a city with mild winter, but also have a much warmer spring than Vancouver (aka: the Miami of Canada, LOL) with less snow.

If put in Canada, Beijing's weather would be desirable. (less the smog of course).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-27-2014, 10:00 AM
 
6,725 posts, read 6,601,290 times
Reputation: 2386
In North America, temperatures are unstable.
In Beijing, lakes are solid frozen for about two months each year and people can skate on them (though accidents happen).

However, in Chicago and Detroit (and probably Toronto) it is often not the case. Sometimes it can be above 50 F (10 C) even in January, very rare for Beijing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2014, 07:42 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,255,922 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
In North America, temperatures are unstable.
In Beijing, lakes are solid frozen for about two months each year and people can skate on them (though accidents happen).

However, in Chicago and Detroit (and probably Toronto) it is often not the case. Sometimes it can be above 50 F (10 C) even in January, very rare for Beijing.
you are right.

What frustrates me sometimes is the sudden temperature change out of blue. And that happens quite often.

For example today is 20C (average should be like 12). Tomorrow the high will be 10 and by Saturday it will be 3. In Jan, it could be 10C one day and -10C the next. Completely unpredictable. Maybe because it is continental climate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top