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Old 11-07-2014, 01:06 PM
 
12,327 posts, read 18,433,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
In fact, those who are very interested in foreign media have their way to access blocked websites, and the government does not really care that much, unless they actively spread "rumors".

English language websites are usually not blocked. Chinese language media in foreign countries, or those containing Chinese versions are sometimes blocked. However, I could browse major websites from Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore when I was in China.

At certain "sensitive" times, a lot of things are blocked including Google.
Of course, there are always ways around it. Most Chinese that want access just use VPN's. Otherwise, most Chinese are far more concerned about more important things like avoiding rush hour traffic, finding a cab in downtown Beijing during work time, or what to have for dinner.

Although, I did a test one time and started entering "Free Tibet" in a search engine I was accessing on my laptop plugged into the hotel wifi as a visiting businessman. It worked a few times...then stopped working...almost like someone was viewing my access real time and "pulled the plug" on my access or something.
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Old 11-11-2014, 08:00 AM
 
9 posts, read 15,254 times
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In Vietnam, facebook, youtube etc are popular websites and not blocked by Vietnamese government. Vietnam is also a communist country.
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:23 PM
 
2,566 posts, read 2,184,035 times
Reputation: 1816
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
Of course, there are always ways around it. Most Chinese that want access just use VPN's. Otherwise, most Chinese are far more concerned about more important things like avoiding rush hour traffic, finding a cab in downtown Beijing during work time, or what to have for dinner.

Although, I did a test one time and started entering "Free Tibet" in a search engine I was accessing on my laptop plugged into the hotel wifi as a visiting businessman. It worked a few times...then stopped working...almost like someone was viewing my access real time and "pulled the plug" on my access or something.
Did you use a VPN for the search? I know for a fact that certain international hotel chains (e.g. Grand Hyatt Beijing by Wangfujing) have pre-built VPNs for all their guest wifi connections so you wouldn't even need your own VPN to access blocked websites if you stay at those (usually 5-star) hotels.

Good advice about not leaving your laptop/smartphone in your hotel room unattended. On recent work trip I left my company-issued Lenovo Thinkpad in the room for 2 hours unattended - disappeared upon return. I reported this to the hotel management, company management, which alerted the local police (laptop contained some confidential company data). 6 hours later the laptop was found and miraculously reappeared at the hotel front desk - this was at 5-star international hotel chain on Nanjing Road West in Shanghai.
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:38 PM
 
5 posts, read 3,976 times
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They have their own search engines, social networking, online shopping and video sites instead of using those of US companies like most other countries. Call it protectionism. They don't want the US and foreign countries to dominate the Chinese market. Now popular Chinese .com companies have a large number of Chinese users or customers and their revenues are growing, rivalling that of the US.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
China is already part of the financial globilisation network and they are not "in a world of it's own" by any means. Chinese are literally my coworkers.
Internet censorship in China is more complex then that. The government simply wants what they think is the best of both worlds - capitalistic money making machines while at the same time paranoid control of it's citizens.
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Old 11-13-2014, 01:24 AM
 
6,726 posts, read 6,615,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ailoi9 View Post
They have their own search engines, social networking, online shopping and video sites instead of using those of US companies like most other countries. Call it protectionism. They don't want the US and foreign countries to dominate the Chinese market. Now popular Chinese .com companies have a large number of Chinese users or customers and their revenues are growing, rivalling that of the US.
Yes, and they are usually better than American products.
Now in China a lot of things can be done with a cell phone app, such as order a taxi. The e-commercial sites have their own delivery systems and everything is very fast.
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Old 11-13-2014, 08:48 AM
 
12,327 posts, read 18,433,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
Good advice about not leaving your laptop/smartphone in your hotel room unattended. On recent work trip I left my company-issued Lenovo Thinkpad in the room for 2 hours unattended - disappeared upon return. I reported this to the hotel management, company management, which alerted the local police (laptop contained some confidential company data). 6 hours later the laptop was found and miraculously reappeared at the hotel front desk - this was at 5-star international hotel chain on Nanjing Road West in Shanghai.
Yup. Needless to say, your laptop and company info has been compromised. Our employees have had problems with viruses being introduced on our laptops when we visit China, most likely snooping software. Either when the laptop was unattended (by the, ummm, "employees") or by accessing their internet somehow.
Once I came back to my room early and found a hotel employee in my room, not a maid, she didn't say a word to me, just left. Clearly, some of the hotel emloyee's in China have, shall we say, other secondary employers that they answer to.
The occupational hazards of being a businessman in China.
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Old 11-13-2014, 09:06 AM
 
2,566 posts, read 2,184,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
Yup. Needless to say, your laptop and company info has been compromised. Our employees have had problems with viruses being introduced on our laptops when we visit China, most likely snooping software. Either when the laptop was unattended (by the, ummm, "employees") or by accessing their internet somehow.
Once I came back to my room early and found a hotel employee in my room, not a maid, she didn't say a word to me, just left. Clearly, some of the hotel emloyee's in China have, shall we say, other secondary employers that they answer to.
The occupational hazards of being a businessman in China.
Oh and as another precaution, I always leave my U.S. smartphone at home whenever I am on a work trip to China and exclusively use locally-bought smartphone with very little personal data stored. This is actually now a company policy (work for a large Bay area tech firm) whenever employees travel to regions where cyber security is a concern. Few months ago I had the pleasure of meeting the ex-Asia Director for National Security Council Kenneth Lieberthal under President Clinton, who recommended the same security precautions when traveling to China.
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Old 11-13-2014, 03:50 PM
 
32,112 posts, read 33,023,250 times
Reputation: 14962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ailoi9 View Post
They have their own search engines, social networking, online shopping and video sites instead of using those of US companies like most other countries. Call it protectionism. They don't want the US and foreign countries to dominate the Chinese market. Now popular Chinese .com companies have a large number of Chinese users or customers and their revenues are growing, rivalling that of the US.
Most Chinese use QQ which seems to be their most popular social network with video functions and I believe also has its own search engine.
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Old 11-14-2014, 08:21 AM
 
Location: On a Long Island in NY
7,684 posts, read 8,494,601 times
Reputation: 7039
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ailoi9 View Post
They have their own search engines, social networking, online shopping and video sites instead of using those of US companies like most other countries. Call it protectionism. They don't want the US and foreign countries to dominate the Chinese market. Now popular Chinese .com companies have a large number of Chinese users or customers and their revenues are growing, rivalling that of the US.
It's not protectionism, it's CONTROL.

The Chinese government seeks to control information. Here in the US I can go on any search engine and read about any and all bad acts carried out by the US government. In China, these 'official' search engines ban the ability to search for subjects like "Tibet independence", "Tienanmen square massacre", "Chinese invasion of ____", etc
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Old 11-14-2014, 10:05 AM
 
12,327 posts, read 18,433,096 times
Reputation: 19227
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
Oh and as another precaution, I always leave my U.S. smartphone at home whenever I am on a work trip to China and exclusively use locally-bought smartphone with very little personal data stored. This is actually now a company policy (work for a large Bay area tech firm) whenever employees travel to regions where cyber security is a concern. Few months ago I had the pleasure of meeting the ex-Asia Director for National Security Council Kenneth Lieberthal under President Clinton, who recommended the same security precautions when traveling to China.
I have a coworker that was born in Eastern Europe and was born behind the Iron Curtain. He layed out how it works while we were in a Shanghai hotel bar "see, this is how it works, some of the employees - the front desk person, the doorman maybe, they have second jobs. They log where businessmen go, they log when they return, they log who they meet, and they report to the government". Some of the working girls that are in all Chinese hotel bars? Same thing.

We have company offices in China, our own company employees of Chinese nationals, same thing. It's not paranoia. The state department states so much on there website and has this advice about China if you are a visiting businessman "expect no personal privacy". I've searched my hotel room for mics before. I suspect when I am taking a sh*t, it's being recorded or logged somewhere. Just part of a US worker doing business in China, Peoples Republic Of.
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