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Old 11-14-2014, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,119,529 times
Reputation: 4565

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I have a coworker that was born in Eastern Europe and was born behind the Iron Curtain. He layed out how it works while we were in a Shanghai hotel bar "see, this is how it works, some of the employees - the front desk person, the doorman maybe, they have second jobs. They log where businessmen go, they log when they return, they log who they meet, and they report to the government". Some of the working girls that are in all Chinese hotel bars? Same thing.

We have company offices in China, our own company employees of Chinese nationals, same thing. It's not paranoia. The state department states so much on there website and has this advice about China if you are a visiting businessman "expect no personal privacy". I've searched my hotel room for mics before. I suspect when I am taking a sh*t, it's being recorded or logged somewhere. Just part of a US worker doing business in China, Peoples Republic Of.
Proves how great a movie The Lives of Others is.
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Old 11-14-2014, 12:16 PM
 
117 posts, read 64,227 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I have a coworker that was born in Eastern Europe and was born behind the Iron Curtain. He layed out how it works while we were in a Shanghai hotel bar "see, this is how it works, some of the employees - the front desk person, the doorman maybe, they have second jobs. They log where businessmen go, they log when they return, they log who they meet, and they report to the government". Some of the working girls that are in all Chinese hotel bars? Same thing.

We have company offices in China, our own company employees of Chinese nationals, same thing. It's not paranoia. The state department states so much on there website and has this advice about China if you are a visiting businessman "expect no personal privacy". I've searched my hotel room for mics before. I suspect when I am taking a sh*t, it's being recorded or logged somewhere. Just part of a US worker doing business in China, Peoples Republic Of.
It doesn't sound like your company having good security prototypes. Most big companies I know require strong encryption at least 486 bit of their employees' whole laptop (hard drives/SSDs) when traveling in a foreign country (China or not) and use at least 55 character long passwords to log in. All data in a hard drive will be wiped off if wrong passwords are entered 10 times.

In addition company's VPN are being used when go online for extra precaution in a foreign country or not. Extra mices and others are carried in case of emergency. Spyware and antivirus software are installed to monitor laptops constantly.
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Old 11-14-2014, 12:20 PM
 
32,071 posts, read 32,968,461 times
Reputation: 14950
Quote:
Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post
It's not protectionism, it's CONTROL.

The Chinese government seeks to control information. Here in the US I can go on any search engine and read about any and all bad acts carried out by the US government. In China, these 'official' search engines ban the ability to search for subjects like "Tibet independence", "Tienanmen square massacre", "Chinese invasion of ____", etc
Exactly!
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Old 11-14-2014, 12:52 PM
 
6,725 posts, read 6,602,936 times
Reputation: 2386
Quote:
Originally Posted by WIHS2006 View Post
It's not protectionism, it's CONTROL.
It's both. China wants their own internet industry too.
Baidu has become the second largest search engine in the world, and has expanded its business to other countries, thanks to China government.
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Old 11-14-2014, 03:22 PM
 
12,279 posts, read 18,401,528 times
Reputation: 19102
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidmun View Post
It doesn't sound like your company having good security prototypes. Most big companies I know require strong encryption at least 486 bit of their employees' whole laptop (hard drives/SSDs) when traveling in a foreign country (China or not) and use at least 55 character long passwords to log in. All data in a hard drive will be wiped off if wrong passwords are entered 10 times.

In addition company's VPN are being used when go online for extra precaution in a foreign country or not. Extra mices and others are carried in case of emergency. Spyware and antivirus software are installed to monitor laptops constantly.
I work for a huge company and we have entire buildings devoted to IT security. Our servers are encrypted, our VPN is encrypted, same with emails, passwords changed every few months, the whole bit. But you know how it works, people download documents and spreadsheets to their hard drive and it's easy pickings. You just need a windows password to access that (55 characters to log in, you have to be joking?). Once you know the windows password you can also get into the outlook and view emails, you can get into registry files. And also let's face it, China has the best hackers in the world. Spyware is introduced just like any virus. For visiting businessmen, the laptops are physically accessed, when we are at dinner or whatever, and spyware introduced, keyloggers, you name it.
And as stated, there is also physical surveilence going on. I am probably not important enough to monitor too closely, but I probably get checked up on from time to time.
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Old 11-14-2014, 11:31 PM
 
2,559 posts, read 2,178,337 times
Reputation: 1810
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
It's both. China wants their own internet industry too.
Baidu has become the second largest search engine in the world, and has expanded its business to other countries, thanks to China government.
I am sure the rest of the world is just clamoring to use Baidu in place of Google, Weibo in place of Twitter, and RenRen in place of FB... give me a break. Why on earth would anyone want to use a heavily censored/castrated version when they could access the real thing without any filters... The only advantage that China might have is Alibaba's Taobao/TMall, and Alibaba was only successful because of its innovation as a privately owned company, not due to the benevolence of the Chinese state (thank god) or else Ma Yun wouldn't be ringing the opening bell in NYSE.
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Old 11-14-2014, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,119,529 times
Reputation: 4565
Baidu is terrible. I hate it. It kidnaps your homepage.
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Old 11-15-2014, 06:24 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,258,456 times
Reputation: 7578
China should really loosen the control on the internet. It serves no purpose and achieves nothing. The only result is a bad international image.

I can understand stuff like air quality can't be improved overnight but all this tight control on speech is utterly stupid.

The next thing needing freedom is the news. They should allow criticism which only helps and will not undermine the country whatsoever. All the bromide makes one sick of any news.
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Old 11-15-2014, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Taipei
6,773 posts, read 5,119,529 times
Reputation: 4565
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
China should really loosen the control on the internet. It serves no purpose and achieves nothing. The only result is a bad international image.

I can understand stuff like air quality can't be improved overnight but all this tight control on speech is utterly stupid.

The next thing needing freedom is the news. They should allow criticism which only helps and will not undermine the country whatsoever. All the bromide makes one sick of any news.
Meh, not under Xi's administration. This fatty is the most power-mongering one you guys have had in these decades.
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Old 11-15-2014, 09:49 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,258,456 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Meh, not under Xi's administration. This fatty is the most power-mongering one you guys have had in these decades.
this fatty? Cameron, Merkel or Holland are not exactly fit or skinny either. I don't see the point of attacking one's weight. So childish.

Not every problem in China has a quick solution, but there are things that can be improved very fast, such as

internet censorship
news coverage
religious freedom
independent judicial system
political persecution

These do nothing in consolidating the Party's status, or helping the country's image. Give people such freedom, let them protest or whatever, won't be the end of the world.
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