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Old 06-17-2015, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,782 posts, read 13,372,272 times
Reputation: 11310

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pennyone View Post
I have no idea what you're talking about. Yulin does exist and the festival is going on right now. It is not a figment of some activist's imagination. I have never heard of dog thieves being beaten. I have read plenty of dog merchants torturing dogs right in front of anti-dog meat activists trying to get them to buy the dogs at huge premium so that they can make money.
Part of the reason that you haven't read about these stories is probably because they don't fit your agenda, or the agenda of the activists pushing these stories...

Chinese dog thieves get their comeuppance as duo are caught and savagely beaten for drugging and stealing pets FOR FOOD | Daily Mail Online

Hunan villagers spend nine hours beating up dog thieves, then turn on the police sent to rescue them: Shanghaiist

There was also a man who *killed* a dog thief, I think in Shanghai, a few months back...

Quote:
The only way to make China's government to take action and make change is to shame them into losing face. Like I said before, the image of Chinese bludgeoning a dog to death is the main narrative, no matter what the "truth" is. This all starts with Yulin and its barbaric cultural habit so don't blame the western media for this.
Not really. At the end of the day, China's gov't DGAF about what other nations think, and they don't appreciate Western and outside meddling, which is a line which that you and other China boosters gleefully use otherwise.

 
Old 06-18-2015, 03:29 AM
 
4,710 posts, read 3,624,053 times
Reputation: 7401
"rPart of the reason that you haven't read about these stories is probably because they don't fit your agenda"...

and...what agenda do you think I have? At the end of the day, Yulin and many other festivals go on unabated. A few villagers who are stoming mad over their lost dogs and want compensation won't fix the damage to China's reputation. They are angry because they lost money, not because they cared all that much about their lost pets.
 
Old 06-18-2015, 03:35 AM
 
4,710 posts, read 3,624,053 times
Reputation: 7401
More civilized behavior by the fun loving Chinese festival goers at Yulin. They now sport running dogs over with cars and pulling them apart with tractors as entertainment, just to make party-goers laugh and eat more. They also torch dogs alive to preserve that "hot flavor"....Great fun. This is the New China where freedom to carry out sadistic acts are ok in the name of tradition.

Yulin dog-eating festival: China’s dog meat celebration sparks outrage
 
Old 06-18-2015, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Manila
1,144 posts, read 1,582,394 times
Reputation: 736
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Most Chinese have never owned a dog or cat, so they don't really have any attachment to them. In my whole extended family, both father and mother sides, only one relative had a dog. This is very different from western countries. But most Chinese have never eaten dog meat either. Even those who do eat dog meat only do that occasionally.

I just hope it can be outlawed because literally, meat without quarantine inspection is not allowed to sell.

I've never heard dog meat guards against ghost either. The common saying is dog meat is "warm" and is good for some "cold" body.
Speaking of which! I know a Russian woman who has a dog and she said it's no fun being a dog owner in China!
 
Old 06-19-2015, 01:30 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,782 posts, read 13,372,272 times
Reputation: 11310
Quote:
Originally Posted by pennyone View Post
"rPart of the reason that you haven't read about these stories is probably because they don't fit your agenda"...

and...what agenda do you think I have? At the end of the day, Yulin and many other festivals go on unabated. A few villagers who are stoming mad over their lost dogs and want compensation won't fix the damage to China's reputation. They are angry because they lost money, not because they cared all that much about their lost pets.
So, if a pet owner in the west decides to sue the person that drugged and killed the poor animal, would you assume that they did so because they cared about the lost value of the animal and the money and tine they had put into it? What of civil suits where someone sues a negligent motorist for the death of their family member?

It can also be argued that since these sickos were doing this for money, the only way to really make them "hurt" was to destroy their car (surprisingly nice and modern for such low-class criminals, by the looks of it; probably bought for them by their family when they married or something) and demand that they pay compensation. Lord knows its not like appealing to their conscience would work.

In any case, rest easy... the festival will be over soon and you can go back to plugging china's superiority to the US for the rest of the year.
 
Old 06-19-2015, 04:21 AM
 
4,710 posts, read 3,624,053 times
Reputation: 7401
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
So, if a pet owner in the west decides to sue the person that drugged and killed the poor animal, would you assume that they did so because they cared about the lost value of the animal and the money and tine they had put into it? What of civil suits where someone sues a negligent motorist for the death of their family member?

It can also be argued that since these sickos were doing this for money, the only way to really make them "hurt" was to destroy their car (surprisingly nice and modern for such low-class criminals, by the looks of it; probably bought for them by their family when they married or something) and demand that they pay compensation. Lord knows its not like appealing to their conscience would work.

In any case, rest easy... the festival will be over soon and you can go back to plugging china's superiority to the US for the rest of the year.
LOL!!! You really don't think evry much, do you!~ This festival isn't over just because the solstice has passed. As I pointed out before, many China bashers like yourself will be very happy to note that all the good that the 50 Billion Beijing Olympics did for China is for nothing. What the world will see is just dirty slaughterhouses with dirty dogs in cages and ugly Chinese folks smiling and sloshing down dog stew.....That's New China for you and it'll be very hard to get rid of that image, like images of shoddy goods etc.

There is nothing superior about China to anyone. Certainly Chinese culture is nothing to rave about. In your deluded mind, you confuse my annoyance with American sense of superiority with my supposed China pushing agenda. Just because Tibet is part of China, or that the SCS should in part be part of China, or that the Diaoyus should be returned to China, does not make the Chinese superior in any sense of the word. Two different ideas and lines of thought, but it might be too complicated for some to follow.
 
Old 06-19-2015, 05:39 AM
 
4,710 posts, read 3,624,053 times
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It's shocking that Yulin's festival is NOT a time honored tradition, but some hyped up grotesque marketing ploy by the town folks and their local corrupt officials in 2009 to drum up tourism. I think they should all be punished by Beijing for ruining China's international reputation. I am still amazed that the Chinese higher authorities didn't intervene and shut it down, given its tremendous public health hazard, its brazen defiance of China's food safety laws and clear detriment to China's international image.

Friend or food? Dog meat festival divides China - CNN.com
 
Old 06-19-2015, 08:56 AM
 
15,740 posts, read 9,265,671 times
Reputation: 14228
Quote:
Originally Posted by pennyone View Post
The only sane and rational position I've read so far in response to the dog slaughtering tradition. I can see how the eating of dog meat can be associated with the efforts at forced industrialization fused with poverty and cultural ignorance from inland and dirty poor province. But it is still a cultural issue, and these poor migrant workers carry with them a cultural flaw that need to be fixed. They came from provinces that eat and kill dogs in grotesque ways. Where did that come from? People get all huffy and puffy, when, in reality, they should re-examine Chinese traditions and see what's rotten and what's worth saving. The fact is, sure Yulin is a fifth tier city, but certainly the eating of dogs is pretty common considering it's so well known, and it is by no means the only place that eats dogs in China, nor is it the only place that have the habit of beating them to death right on the streets. It's a cultural flaw in the sense that they don't see the grotesque inhumanity of the act of beating something to death in such a horrid way just for the taste of the meat in a certain way. You don't find this problematic? The fact that there are even some Chinese, or ethnic Chinese who come on here to defend it (as if it's some sort of cultural badge of honor), is even more disturbing. My experience in Nanjing, though short and limited, does not negate the fact that Yulin and many other places have tragic traditions that still run today, in the enlightened 21 century and much to the delight of many locals no less (see story).

You can muddle the water all you want with cries against Chinese political repression or what not. You can even make it into some struggle between conservatism and liberalism, whatever that means in the Chinese context, but you can never get away from two facts...Your beef with the CCP isn't something that I care to address here.

1) Yulin and other Chinese places have grotesque traditions that are still very popular in China today. This is a cultural flaw.

2) To this day, China's government still does not have an anti-cruelty law not because the CCP is evil, but because it sense that many Chinese won't accept it. Many delegates to the NPC in fact state this over and over again as they pass of such a proposal repeatedly. This is a strong evidence of a cultural flaw, not a political problem.
1. Based on your western perspective. And quite a racist perspective, as well.

2. Since when does CCP keep from doing something because the people won't accept it?
 
Old 06-19-2015, 08:59 AM
 
15,740 posts, read 9,265,671 times
Reputation: 14228
Quote:
Originally Posted by pennyone View Post
Here, if you don't believe how barbaric some Chinese are, then just watch the picture caption from the link below. If you read Chinese, then even better.

Basically, there is a dog fight on a city street, and as the two dogs struggled, the weaker one was dragged out by its owner (presumably) and then beaten to death right there on the spot with a bat. That's the sad fate of a dog in China (and most other animals). So barbaric, and this happened in broad day light, out in the open, with people watching and no police intervention because it's just considered "normal" in China.

If this is normal, I wonder what is considered not normal in China! All of you who are Chinese cultural apologists should be ashamed of yourselves. The Chinese people should be ashamed that they allow this sort of things to happen in their own country (among other deplorable things). But I am sadly no longer all that surprised by these news from China.

This also happened in Guangdong province, where someone from Guangzhou (capital city of the province) proudly proclaimed in a previous post that he is so civilized and that it's the inland migrants who eat dogs. Well, it looks to me like the "prosperous" and "civilized" people of Guangdong province is not so kind and civilized after all. What's sad is that Guangdong is one of China's most advanced and prosperous province by GDP count.....

广东汕头血腥斗狗:狗输后遭主人当场活活摔死 -6park.com
News flash: that happens in other countries, INCLUDING THE US, as well. Does that mean, because it happens here, we are also barbaric and considered culturally flawed?
 
Old 06-19-2015, 10:49 AM
 
4,710 posts, read 3,624,053 times
Reputation: 7401
Here, yet another article with lots of nice pictures of the festivals and the food stalls specializing in dog and cat meat. Not only is the whole festival ghastly, it's incredibly unhygienic. Diseases like rabies is incredibly high in Guangxi where Yulin is. I guess it's divine karma of some sort. Where are the city food regulators? Yet another reason never to buy any food grown or touched by the Chinese.....

Chinatown restaurants here in the US routinely get inspected and fail their inspections. In Boston alone, the top four restaurants in the whole city of 600K that get the most citations for sanitation violations are all Chinese run. Now I see the Chinese behave the same way in regards to food preparations both inside and outside of China. The whole thing is grotesque, barbaric and dirty, to say the least.


China’s annual dog-eating festival prompts social media firestorm - The Washington Post

Last edited by Oldhag1; 06-19-2015 at 12:24 PM.. Reason: Removed deleted post
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