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Old 07-22-2015, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,355,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post
I got your point now, and don't know people who are not tolerate of hot food but can enjoy extremely hot food, other than Koreans, especially Korean men.

Hmm... I might know what those Koreans do. What did you do every weekend when you were a college student? For me, go out and get drunk. If I could drink more than others, then I thought I was a man, lol.
Ain't that the truth. I recall not long after I moved here to China, I was at a bar with many Africans, Middle Easterners, and Latin Americans... after a number of beers, I chugged four bottles of Tabasco sauce and drank a jar of Guilin pepper sauce to prove my tolerance for heat, which of course was really just a measure of "manliness." Lots of pats on the back and selfies with guys who were flabbergasted, and probably thinking to themselves, "better your stomach than mine..." :X

Even as someone with a superhuman tolerance for spiciness, I never really understood why it was considered "manly." I just like hot food because I like hot food
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Old 07-22-2015, 05:18 AM
 
2 posts, read 1,378 times
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I am not much aware about other countries but Indian and Thai people are most tolerant of spicy food, especially for their curries and snacks.
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Old 07-25-2015, 09:48 PM
 
919 posts, read 602,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Ain't that the truth. I recall not long after I moved here to China, I was at a bar with many Africans, Middle Easterners, and Latin Americans... after a number of beers, I chugged four bottles of Tabasco sauce and drank a jar of Guilin pepper sauce to prove my tolerance for heat, which of course was really just a measure of "manliness." Lots of pats on the back and selfies with guys who were flabbergasted, and probably thinking to themselves, "better your stomach than mine..." :X

Even as someone with a superhuman tolerance for spiciness, I never really understood why it was considered "manly." I just like hot food because I like hot food
LOL!

Men tend to be more extreme than women. Here I am thinking of serial killers, philosophers, politicians, and so on.

That's why we, or men, think one who can go extreme is a man. How stupid are we?
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Old 07-26-2015, 05:39 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
12,586 posts, read 15,054,657 times
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I'd also say that Thais and Koreans can eat very spicy foods, while Japanese and Filipinos usually are not fond of spicy foods.
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Old 07-26-2015, 09:45 PM
 
722 posts, read 921,775 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ccm123 View Post
I'd also say that Thais and Koreans can eat very spicy foods, while Japanese and Filipinos usually are not fond of spicy foods.
Taishanese dont really eat any spicey hot foods either, maybe just a little bit of chili oil on the dim sum.
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Old 09-02-2015, 10:03 PM
 
4 posts, read 5,330 times
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In general, wealthier coastal areas in China eat less spicy food. But if the region is inland, less prosperous and has a drier/wetter climate, then the people there tend to eat spicier food. Let's take eastern China for an example. Places like Shanghai, Ningbo or Suzhou don't eat much spicy food (aside from the popularity of Sichuanese cuisine). But if you go inland to southern Anhui or southwestern Zhejiang the cuisine there can be hot and spicy like as in Jiangxi, Hunan and Sichuan. Same reason why northwestern Chinese cuisine is also quite spicy.
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Old 09-03-2015, 11:53 PM
 
97 posts, read 86,238 times
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I have no clue, but all I know is that some Sichuan restaurants I've been to (in California and Hong Kong) felt like I was breathing fire. Almost everything had large amounts of chili peppers in it. Soups were blanketed with a sea of redness. Actually it's so hot it makes my lips numb.
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Old 09-04-2015, 12:39 PM
 
448 posts, read 499,460 times
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Most overseas Chinese in Southeast Asia and the West do not eat much spicy food. As most of them originated from Shanghai, Fujian, Taiwan, Guangdong, Hainan and Hong Kong, where traditionally the food there are not spicy. Recent trend of more spiciness in the overseas Chinese community are due to new influence from inland China and the Southeast Asians.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goujian View Post
In general, wealthier coastal areas in China eat less spicy food. But if the region is inland, less prosperous and has a drier/wetter climate, then the people there tend to eat spicier food. Let's take eastern China for an example. Places like Shanghai, Ningbo or Suzhou don't eat much spicy food (aside from the popularity of Sichuanese cuisine). But if you go inland to southern Anhui or southwestern Zhejiang the cuisine there can be hot and spicy like as in Jiangxi, Hunan and Sichuan. Same reason why northwestern Chinese cuisine is also quite spicy.
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Old 09-04-2015, 03:36 PM
 
1,424 posts, read 735,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boingyman View Post
I have no clue, but all I know is that some Sichuan restaurants I've been to (in California and Hong Kong) felt like I was breathing fire. Almost everything had large amounts of chili peppers in it. Soups were blanketed with a sea of redness. Actually it's so hot it makes my lips numb.
What makes your lips numb is actually Sichuan peppercorn, which is found in Indian food too.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sichuan_pepper

When I came to the US years ago, we were not allowed to bring it in because it was considered a drug (now it is ok).
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Old 09-05-2015, 12:04 AM
 
27 posts, read 36,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceMonkyPunks View Post
Laos should be bumped up right behind or on par with Thailand, IMO.

The issan reign of Thailand is heavily ethnically Lao anyway.

Korean food is not spicy at all IMHO...but Japan would be the absolute lowest. (Not that they are bad - I highly enjoy both but they are not spicy.)
you mean Lao is heavily influenced by Isan region, right? How comes it's Lao food when they use Thai food products like fish sauce and shrimp paste?
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