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Old 07-08-2015, 06:52 PM
 
6,066 posts, read 10,848,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Just a quick update, I've now been in Karakol, in far eastern Kyrgyzstan for three days, and I cant think of anyplace Ive ever felt safer. But getting by with no Russian is very trying, mitigated by the peoples patience and open warmth.

Kyrgyzstan, even in the capital, seems to have no post-Soviet development at all, and even has a pre-Sovie, Czarist era aspect. A real treasure, without the ugly clutter of the modern centurt. Yet very clean and vicaly maintained.

Ive found a complete absence of obesity, smoking, and plastic water bottles…

Sorry about the inescable Android gibberish, try nicely for vically
Are Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan identical nations, or is there much variation between their national identity?

Were they ever supposed to join unification at any time in history outside of Russian Soviet imperialism?


Kyrgyzstan appears more rustic, yet less stable, and wealthy. Kazakhstan has a fair share of high mountains around Almaty. Have you visited Issyk-Kul Biosphere Reserve next door to Karakol, the 4th biggest city of Kyrgyzstan?

I wonder what Almaty corresponds to compared with Bishkek, and if they inspire each other not far away. Was Almaty was your first destination around Central Asia land?

Other people have said there is an invigorating, refreshing simplistic or complex lack of clutter around Central Asia, especially Kazakhstan.


There is nothing wrong with obesity. Better than people starving themselves. Smoking from Hookah Lounges is an exception to the rule, quite fun, and spiritual in the zone activity.
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Old 07-10-2015, 05:05 AM
 
192 posts, read 127,260 times
Reputation: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Many people, and websites, including official sources of information claim 90-95%+ of Turkey is a relatively safe travel destination. Turkish Black Sea is unanimously ranked as safe, and even some areas(not all) of Southeastern Turkey gets the same title, including around the province of where Van is situated. A travel map on Turkey: https://assets.digital.cabinet-offic...urkey_jpeg.jpg
I don't know why Tunceli is considered dangerous. The rest of the map makes sense, which is a shame. Mardin is THE place to visit in Southeastern Turkey, and only a few years ago it was incredibly safe.

Quote:
When in the Van Turkey area, maybe venture out to Armenia rather close by, and offering another stark contrast of scenery rather quickly.
By 'venture out to Armenia' did you mean go to the border or did you mean go into Armenia? The former is doable (and worthwhile if you visit Ani). The latter is not, unless you want to try to outfox a lot of soldiers and sneak across a closed border.
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Old 07-10-2015, 01:41 PM
 
6,066 posts, read 10,848,039 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yabanci View Post
I don't know why Tunceli is considered dangerous. The rest of the map makes sense, which is a shame. Mardin is THE place to visit in Southeastern Turkey, and only a few years ago it was incredibly safe.
Well, the travel map on Turkey illustrate a vast majority of Turkey is safe enough, 73 out of 81 provinces all over the country. Technically good news, and comforting with foreigners wanting to visit Turkey (especially outside of the border lands of the far Southeast).

Turkey is a divided country recently, more than ever before in all of human recorded history, for centuries, or at least some decades time length.

Tunceli Province is quite arbitrary, probably the only province really portraying a bizarre situation. My educated estimation is a rural Kurdish stronghold occurred there with the Kurdistan Worker's Party on Tunceli Province land.


Despite some conflict of just some outreaching provinces, Turkey reached a tourism renaissance in the past 2 decades. 1995: Around 7 million foreign tourist arrivals, and 2014: 41 million- 42 million foreign tourists visiting Turkey, now the 6th most visited country in the entire World.


Legitimate websites accurately claiming the situation:

Turkey attracts more tourists despite regional, local crises - TOURISM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Turkey

42 million tourists visit Turkey in 2014 - Daily Sabah


Quote:
By 'venture out to Armenia' did you mean go to the border or did you mean go into Armenia? The former is doable (and worthwhile if you visit Ani). The latter is not, unless you want to try to outfox a lot of soldiers and sneak across a closed border.
Each at the same time equally. Ironically Armenia's dominant largest city of Yerevan is only 10 miles away from the Turkish-Armenia border. Seems much further away. Van Turkey itself is only 1 hour away from areas of Iran. Surreal.
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Old 07-10-2015, 06:59 PM
 
15,545 posts, read 13,536,591 times
Reputation: 21303
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Just a quick update, I've now been in Karakol, in far eastern Kyrgyzstan for three days, and I cant think of anyplace Ive ever felt safer. But getting by with no Russian is very trying, mitigated by the peoples patience and open warmth.

Kyrgyzstan, even in the capital, seems to have no post-Soviet development at all, and even has a pre-Sovie, Czarist era aspect. A real treasure, without the ugly clutter of the modern centurt. Yet very clean and vicaly maintained.

Ive found a complete absence of obesity, smoking, and plastic water bottles…

Sorry about the inescable Android gibberish, try nicely for vically
Karakol and Kyrgyzstan in general is very scenic. There is not much development, other than apartment buildings and renovations of existing structures, and that is one of many problems, with that the infrastructure itself is not even updated. Luckily, the Soviets over built everything so it is sturdy and lasts quit e a while as well as easy to fix.

It is not too clean, venture out and about and you will find trash everywhere, I actually tried to create a clean up group where I lived and the area was trashed within a week after our first mass clean up. They tend to keep the downtown, higher presence areas cleaner, but venture out into micro regions and it just gets trashier, not to mention the outskirts where people build those mud brick shacks. Also, many once nice city parks have been destroyed or partly destroyed by people just coming in and cutting down trees illegally.

But yea, for a country so poor, they do keep it generally not too bad, and are pretty well "civilized" I guess you could describe it.

In Bishkek they smoke much more, and men smoke more than women, plenty of smokers, they sell cigarettes everywhere, but I do not know the rate compared to other places, but I do not think it is extraordinary high or anything.

It is getting better now, for a while during the mid-2000's, it was just getting bad.
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Old 07-10-2015, 07:10 PM
 
15,545 posts, read 13,536,591 times
Reputation: 21303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Are Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan identical nations, or is there much variation between their national identity?

Were they ever supposed to join unification at any time in history outside of Russian Soviet imperialism?
No, they are not identical, never were, never intended to be. The current borders were just arbitrary lines drawn, which has created some issues even to this day (and everywhere in the former USSR).


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Kyrgyzstan appears more rustic, yet less stable, and wealthy. Kazakhstan has a fair share of high mountains around Almaty. Have you visited Issyk-Kul Biosphere Reserve next door to Karakol, the 4th biggest city of Kyrgyzstan?
I have been there, no doubt Kyrgyzstan and central Asia in general has spectacular scenery. Kyrgyzstan is less stable, to revolts since 2005, but I think Kazakhstan might have some problems once dear leader dies off as he has pretty much forcibly smashed any resentment to his rule. But this would depend on the economic cycle and how vying factions act after dear leader's death.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
I wonder what Almaty corresponds to compared with Bishkek, and if they inspire each other not far away. Was Almaty was your first destination around Central Asia land?
Almaty no doubt is more modern, but also more expensive. There is more employment opportunity in Almaty, many Kyrgyz citizens travel back and forth to Almaty making a buck. That said, I like Bishkek better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Other people have said there is an invigorating, refreshing simplistic or complex lack of clutter around Central Asia, especially Kazakhstan.
I guess it could be described that way, when you leave the city, you leave it and find yourself meandering in what seems the middle of no where, pretty amazing I think. I also like it you can just pull off the road and start up a fire to cook some food, no one bothers you, there is an describable freedom you feel when there that you cannot get living in the West.
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Old 07-11-2015, 04:42 AM
 
192 posts, read 127,260 times
Reputation: 230
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepastpresentandfuture View Post
Well, the travel map on Turkey illustrate a vast majority of Turkey is safe enough, 73 out of 81 provinces all over the country. Technically good news, and comforting with foreigners wanting to visit Turkey (especially outside of the border lands of the far Southeast).

Turkey is a divided country recently, more than ever before in all of human recorded history, for centuries, or at least some decades time length.
Turkey hasn't been as divided as it is now since, well, the nineties.

Quote:

Tunceli Province is quite arbitrary, probably the only province really portraying a bizarre situation. My educated estimation is a rural Kurdish stronghold occurred there with the Kurdistan Worker's Party on Tunceli Province land.
Completely arbitrary. I'm sure your explanation is the rational that was used, but doesn't fit with what I know. Tunceli is very different from the rest of the Southeast--they are mostly Zaza, Alevi and well educated (it is one of the most, if not the most, well educated il in Turkey). The PKK have a presence, but they aren't particularly loved--most of the people of Tunceli first and foremost identify themselves as Alevi.

Diyarbakir, on the other hand, has a very large PKK presence, and there have been notable conflict between their supporters and Hizbullah supporters recently. It was also the site of an ISIS bombing last month.

Quote:

Despite some conflict of just some outreaching provinces, Turkey reached a tourism renaissance in the past 2 decades. 1995: Around 7 million foreign tourist arrivals, and 2014: 41 million- 42 million foreign tourists visiting Turkey, now the 6th most visited country in the entire World.


Legitimate websites accurately claiming the situation:

Turkey attracts more tourists despite regional, local crises - TOURISM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tourism_in_Turkey

42 million tourists visit Turkey in 2014 - Daily Sabah
Turkey is an amazing country, and mostly safe (except for the drivers). I should point out, though, that the last source you cite is NOT what I would consider legitimate. Sabah is often nothing more than pro-AK Party propaganda.


Quote:
Each at the same time equally. Ironically Armenia's dominant largest city of Yerevan is only 10 miles away from the Turkish-Armenia border. Seems much further away. Van Turkey itself is only 1 hour away from areas of Iran. Surreal.
And even more ironically, reaching Yerevan requires a very long journey. To enter Armenia legally, one would have to pass through Iran or Georgia. The Turkish-Armenian border has been closed since 1993, and there are soldiers on both sides guarding it.
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