U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-06-2015, 05:02 AM
 
595 posts, read 449,519 times
Reputation: 345

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post
That's true.

I don't cook by myself but my wife does with very little oil

There are some restaurants in Taipei which promote them with a sign board saying:

No MSG

By the way, my most favorite Korean food is Samgyetang, or 參雞湯 with Chinese characters, which means:

sam 參: ginseng
gye 雞: chicken
tang 湯: soup
You should learn how to cook.

That dish exists in chinese cuisine among other cuisines.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-06-2015, 07:18 AM
 
919 posts, read 602,586 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigboibob View Post
You should learn how to cook.

That dish exists in chinese cuisine among other cuisines.
You should learn how to give information to others

What do you call it in Chinese or other languages? I want to check them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2015, 10:53 AM
 
15,734 posts, read 9,249,739 times
Reputation: 14217
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
I don't know how a certain kind of food can be modern (or not modern). Both countries (and probably more than these two) have Kimchi - but China didn't really go out of their way to promote it overseas as some sort of a national treasure. I don't deny Korea did a good job in that respect.

Plus, how can Kimchi be "healthy"? just because it is vegetable? It is impossible for preserved vegetable with tons of salt to be "healthy".

China does a horrible job in promoting its own cuisine (or anything culturally Chinese as a matter of fact). This is why even today Chinese food in many westerners mind still lies in the cheap form of a white box with greasy chow mein in it, when there are so many highly sophisticated cooking styles and amazingly bountiful varieties. I give the credit to Japan who is the performer in successfully promoting their national food. Korea lies in between but is getting some stream for sure.
I don't think Korea made a special effort to "promote" Kimchi. I don't think they care at all - they treasure it because it's something they have every day. Kind of like a comfort food.

As for the health aspects of Kimchi, you might want to actually do some research before you make ignorant statements. Kimchi is healthy because it's fermented, which promotes good "gut" health. Yes, it's a vegetable, which makes it healthy. But it's the fermentation process that makes it a super food. So yes, apparently it IS possible for a vegetable to be preserved with tons of salt and still be healthy.

This non-Korean likes Kimchi (partially because of it's health aspects), makes her own Kimchi, and has named her dog Kimchi.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-06-2015, 06:09 PM
 
7 posts, read 6,002 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringwise View Post
I don't think Korea made a special effort to "promote" Kimchi. I don't think they care at all - they treasure it because it's something they have every day. Kind of like a comfort food.

As for the health aspects of Kimchi, you might want to actually do some research before you make ignorant statements. Kimchi is healthy because it's fermented, which promotes good "gut" health. Yes, it's a vegetable, which makes it healthy. But it's the fermentation process that makes it a super food. So yes, apparently it IS possible for a vegetable to be preserved with tons of salt and still be healthy.

This non-Korean likes Kimchi (partially because of it's health aspects), makes her own Kimchi, and has named her dog Kimchi.
That's a cute name for a dog. I thought about naming one of my dogs Kimchi once, but then I realized as a Korean-American, I would be the recipient of too many dog-eating jokes naming my pet after a food.

And yeah Kimchi rocks, but not only because I'm Korean. Briny, spicy, crunchy and sour. The heat, the texture and the acid make it a great complement to so many dishes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2015, 10:43 AM
 
15,734 posts, read 9,249,739 times
Reputation: 14217
Quote:
Originally Posted by SmashAcid View Post
That's a cute name for a dog. I thought about naming one of my dogs Kimchi once, but then I realized as a Korean-American, I would be the recipient of too many dog-eating jokes naming my pet after a food.

And yeah Kimchi rocks, but not only because I'm Korean. Briny, spicy, crunchy and sour. The heat, the texture and the acid make it a great complement to so many dishes.
I've always wanted to name a dog Kimchi, and now I have one. Her nickname is "corn" however. A friend didn't know what Kimchi was. I tried to explain it - a side dish, that Koreans have with their meals. She said, "oh, so you basically named her "corn". The nickname stuck.

And yes, I do love Kimchi. I throw it into everything - I especially love it fried.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2015, 02:50 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
4,857 posts, read 3,382,404 times
Reputation: 7744
It all tastes better with a little Soju too. That 20% alcohol content makes everything taste good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2015, 10:08 PM
 
919 posts, read 602,586 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by ringwise View Post
I don't think Korea made a special effort to "promote" Kimchi.
Well, there are not many Chinese words were invented and required China to use by foreigners. One of them is 辛奇, Kimchi in Korean.

Also you should google The Role of Kimchi in Korean Culinary Nationalism and Cultural Identity:

This paper is a great example of investigation on “identity” in the field of the humanities. The paper
explores conflicts of interest when kimchi, a staple food item in Korean cuisine, is promoted outside of the
peninsula as a “traditional” and “national” cultural product of Korea. When South Korean government
steps in as the main promoter of Korean cultural products overseas, many problems arise and the case of
kimchi bears all the complicated questions of promoting a specific national cultural product to the global
community.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2015, 10:09 PM
 
919 posts, read 602,586 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
It all tastes better with a little Soju too. That 20% alcohol content makes everything taste good.
Soju, especially Jirro, gives me headache. I prefer dong dong ju
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2015, 11:18 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,312 posts, read 6,969,122 times
Reputation: 3503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ichig View Post
This article is reporting that the interest for South Korean cuisine is growing in London, I have no knowledge about South Korean food, but they appear to be similar to Chinese and Japanese, do you think that South Korean foods can compete or even get the "market share" of Japanese/Chinese cuisine as the most popular Asian cuisine in the western world?

Link:
Korean food finds global appetite - BBC News
Where do you live, Ichig? Korean food is already hugely popular in the US...kinda swept the nation over the past decade. One difference though is that Korean food is still generally more expensive (at least compared to the "cheap" versions of Japanese/Chinese) In many cities there is at least one Korean restaurant, but usually there aren't a whole bunch, so prices remain a bit high. As popularity has brought it more mainstream, in larger cities the price points have fallen, and hopefully this trend continues. Also over the more recent years there's been a lot of fusion Korean cuisine...like Korean-inspired tacos, burgers and sushi.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-12-2015, 03:21 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,516 posts, read 5,458,888 times
Reputation: 2828
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post
That's true.

I don't cook by myself but my wife does with very little oil

There are some restaurants in Taipei which promote them with a sign board saying:

No MSG

By the way, my most favorite Korean food is Samgyetang, or 參雞湯 with Chinese characters, which means:

sam 參: ginseng
gye 雞: chicken
tang 湯: soup
My mother in law always makes it as a greeting dish when we get back to Seoul, looking forward to bowl next week

Last edited by danielsa1775; 07-12-2015 at 03:33 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top