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Old 07-28-2015, 10:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Salmonburgher View Post

Just trying to see what the point of your post is.
If you don't see the "point", move on to the next thread.

I am sure many of the interesting scientific facts are new to many members here.
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Old 07-28-2015, 12:32 PM
 
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Default body odor

Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
the point is genetic differences. Of course everyone can be stinky under certain circumstances. '

What don't you get it? Asians can have curly/blond hair if they decide to curl/dye their hair, but genetically they don't have curly/blond hair. That's what I am talking about it.
I know what you mean, some ethnic groups can take a hot shower and use soap and they still have body odor, it's more than just being clean, it's more of a natural odor from being a different breed

some dogs smell, slobber and have more oil and odors than other dogs, different ethnic groups are kind of like different breed of humans, just like other animals.

people dont want to accept that humans are not all the same, if you say they are different it cause discrimination, it's OK to say something about a animal like different types of dogs, but not OK to say that about humans or some may be offended.
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Old 07-28-2015, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Kūkiʻo, HI & Manhattan Beach, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
I am sure many of the interesting scientific facts are new to many members here.
The so-called "scientific facts" aren't really that new -- they are simply regurgitated stereotypes bolstered by a bit of "scientific racism."

For instance, let's look at the "body odor/earwax" issue in the Scientific American "People without Gene for Underarm Odor Still Wear Deodorant" article by Tia Ghose and LlveScience that you linked to in a little more detail…
People Without Gene for Underarm Odor Still Wear Deodorant -- Scientific American
People Who Don't Stink Still Wear Deodorant -- LiveScience

Other than the title and author credits, the article is exactly the same in both places. However, while "Scientific American" is somewhat respected, LiveScience is less so -- since it's merely a website that takes obscure studies published in various journals and "dumbs" them down for general consumption and entertainment value. Cognizant of this, here's a link to the original study published in the Journal for Instigative Dermatology by Santiago Rodriguez, Colin Steer, Alexandra Farrow, Jean Golding and Ian Day entitled "Dependence of Deodorant Usage on ABCC11 Genotype: Scope for Personalized Genetics in Personal Hygiene" that the Scientic American and LiveScience articles refer to...
Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Dependence of Deodorant Usage on ABCC11 Genotype: Scope for Personalized Genetics in Personal Hygiene

Now, let's look at the Ian Day quote in the Scientific American and LiveScience article that pertains to East Asians and Koreans…
Several years ago ago, scientists discovered that a gene called ABCC11 determined whether people produced wet or dry earwax. Interestingly, people who produce the "dry" version of earwax also lack a chemical in their armpits that bacteria feed on to cause underarm odor.

"This key gene is basically the single determinant of whether you do produce underarm odor or not," Day said.

While only 2 percent of Europeans lack the genes for smelly armpits, most East Asians and almost all Koreans lack this gene, Day told LiveScience.


And, compare it to what the authors of the original Journal of Investigative Dermatology article wrote concerning the applicability of their findings to "non-white" individuals…
We also analyzed deodorant usage in non-white individuals. In non-whites, we found effects similar to those observed in UK Europeans. rs17822931 AA homozygotes were less likely to use deodorant than GA and GG individuals. This is consistent with the lower production of axillary odorants in AA homozygotes regardless of their ethnic origin and represents an extension, to non-whites, of the results observed in our work in UK Europeans in relation to deodorant usage and rs17822931. However, these results should be interpreted with caution, given the small sample size and the possibility of population substructure within non-whites.


Anyone that has studied statistics is aware of the problems that arise from making inferences about a population based on a small sample. Thus, the linkage between earwax type, smelly armpits, and ethnicity is somewhat questionable.
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Old 07-28-2015, 02:01 PM
 
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^ your quote research is more about deodorant usage than racial difference in auxiliary odour.

It has been proven that "Earwax type and axillary odor are genetically determined by rs17822931, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located in the ABCC11 gene" and that "there is a higher frequency of the A allele in east Asians, and therefore higher prevalence of the dry earwax type. In contrast, the wet earwax type is more prevalent in European and African populations because of higher frequencies of the G allele."

I don't know what you are trying to refute here. The result may not be what you want to hear (which is what upsets you) but that's just a fact.
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Old 07-28-2015, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Kūkiʻo, HI & Manhattan Beach, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
^ your quote research is more about deodorant usage than racial difference in auxiliary odour.

It has been proven that "Earwax type and axillary odor are genetically determined by rs17822931, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located in the ABCC11 gene" and that "there is a higher frequency of the A allele in east Asians, and therefore higher prevalence of the dry earwax type. In contrast, the wet earwax type is more prevalent in European and African populations because of higher frequencies of the G allele."

I don't know what you are trying to refute here. The result may not be what you want to hear (which is what upsets you) but that's just a fact.
Considering that the Scientific American article that you quoted and the original research that it's based on don't necessarily support the conclusion that there's a genetic basis for "racial differences in axillary odor," there's nothing to refute.

Let's look at what you wrote earlier…
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
You know the important stuff white and black people can't live without,deodorant? It is hard to find them in a China or Korea. About 5% of Chinese have noticeable body odour, vs about 90% among Caucacians and 99% of blacks. In Chinese we call that "fox stink" because it is unusual and unpleasant while among other races it is common (unusual not to have it). This is why they take a shower in the MORNING. I can go without a show for a week and nobody will smell anything (not that it is something we should do). Basically all humans carry this gene (like all animals) when they left Africa but only east Asians lost it somehow.
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
I always wondered why ear secretion is called "ear wax", how is it wax? Until I realize white and black people have wet and often oily stuff from the ears. Asians have it too, but it is usually thin flakes, and completely dry. I was pretty shocked to learn the difference.
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
The truth is, after a regular work day involving probably slight physical activity, a white man's arm pits smell while an Asian man' don't. This is why majority of Asians do not need deodorant products while in Europe and America you have an entire isle dedicated to that and most people have to use it every single day.

Deodorant is so popular in western countries that even white people without the gene for armpit odours still use it, because they feel weird not to since everyone does. It is like a complete bald person uses a comb just because everyone else does.

People without Gene for Underarm Odor Still Wear Deodorant - Scientific American
If you have another source to buttress your assertion that only "about 5% of Chinese have noticeable body odor," I'd love to see it. Keep in mind that the source (or sources) should have a statistically significant sample size to minimize sampling bias and account for the impact of diet on body odor.
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Old 07-28-2015, 04:58 PM
 
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That underarm odor is called 狐臭 in Chinese.

Some scholars suggest it was originally 胡臭. 胡 and 狐 have the same pronunciation in Chinese. 胡 refers to non-Chinese people from the north and northwest.
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:28 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
That underarm odor is called 狐臭 in Chinese.

Some scholars suggest it was originally 胡臭. 胡 and 狐 have the same pronunciation in Chinese. 胡 refers to non-Chinese people from the north and northwest.
Fascinating.

"From the north" would tend to mean.... Manchus and Mongols." From the NW" would mean Turkic peoples, and possibly the Westerners in the Tarim Basin in ancient times.

So, do Altaic peoples have different sweat glands, or whatever the issue is, than Chinese?
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Kūkiʻo, HI & Manhattan Beach, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
That underarm odor is called 狐臭 in Chinese.

Some scholars suggest it was originally 胡臭. 胡 and 狐 have the same pronunciation in Chinese. 胡 refers to non-Chinese people from the north and northwest.
That's interesting. In Japanese, that "underarm odor" is callled 腋臭 (wakiga). For non-Japanese people from the West, the term バター臭い ("batā kusai" or "smelling of butter") is used.
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Fascinating.

" From the NW" would mean Turkic peoples, and possibly the Westerners in the Tarim Basin in ancient times.

So, do Altaic peoples have different sweat glands, or whatever the issue is, than Chinese?
Not just Turkic and Tocharians. Chinese had a lot of contact with Persian and Arab peoples too, including the Saka https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saka , especially in Tang Dynasty. They could also be called 胡。
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Old 07-28-2015, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Kūkiʻo, HI & Manhattan Beach, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Fascinating.

"From the north" would tend to mean.... Manchus and Mongols." From the NW" would mean Turkic peoples, and possibly the Westerners in the Tarim Basin in ancient times.

So, do Altaic peoples have different sweat glands, or whatever the issue is, than Chinese?
While the number of sweat glands varies by the individual, the sweat glands are the same. As the Japanese language alludes to, one's diet probably has a greater impact on one's particular odor than anything else.
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