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Old 08-10-2015, 02:54 PM
 
5,222 posts, read 5,090,121 times
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"The nail that sticks up gets hammered down."


No, thank you.

 
Old 08-10-2015, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,366 posts, read 1,810,285 times
Reputation: 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
but the American definition of high standard of living is nothing but just a large house in the middle of nowhere. Is that really "high standard" living when you need to drive 10-30 minutes to do everything, including trivial things like catch a movie or buy some cigarettes?

Do the 17 year old kids think it is a high standard of living when they are so far from everything and doing any fun involved a car ride from the parents? How do they meet their friends? taking the bus which comes on the hour?

The so called high standard of living is mostly associated with big houses with all the unnecessary space one think he needs just because everyone else does. It is not that high after all.

In Japan, people may live in small apartments, but you can't call that life not high standard when everything is at your doorstep.
Being able to walk to any restaurant or event is priceless. I'll take that over a big house in a town with no culture or good food.
 
Old 08-10-2015, 04:32 PM
 
1,424 posts, read 734,986 times
Reputation: 508
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
but the American definition of high standard of living is nothing but just a large house in the middle of nowhere. Is that really "high standard" living when you need to drive 10-30 minutes to do everything, including trivial things like catch a movie or buy some cigarettes?

Do the 17 year old kids think it is a high standard of living when they are so far from everything and doing any fun involved a car ride from the parents? How do they meet their friends? taking the bus which comes on the hour?

The so called high standard of living is mostly associated with big houses with all the unnecessary space one think he needs just because everyone else does. It is not that high after all.

In Japan, people may live in small apartments, but you can't call that life not high standard when everything is at your doorstep.
Americans are very "independent" and are not really social.
Most Americans do not know their friends' age, salary, etc., and do not turn to their friends in case they need help. Often times long-term neighbors don't know each others' telephone numbers.

Some people like that. They don't bother others, and don't want others to bother them.
 
Old 08-10-2015, 04:41 PM
 
1,567 posts, read 823,415 times
Reputation: 1647
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
but the American definition of high standard of living is nothing but just a large house in the middle of nowhere. Is that really "high standard" living when you need to drive 10-30 minutes to do everything, including trivial things like catch a movie or buy some cigarettes?

Do the 17 year old kids think it is a high standard of living when they are so far from everything and doing any fun involved a car ride from the parents? How do they meet their friends? taking the bus which comes on the hour?

The so called high standard of living is mostly associated with big houses with all the unnecessary space one think he needs just because everyone else does. It is not that high after all.

In Japan, people may live in small apartments, but you can't call that life not high standard when everything is at your doorstep.
That was my living arrangement in Japan a few years ago. Shopping, post office, banking, exercise, dining, nightlife, etc. was all walking distance from my (not enormous, but brand-new) apartment; work was my only necessary day-to-day commute.

But most people in the US prefer the oversized house and oversized car, overlooking their neighbors' oversized houses and oversized cars. More Americans are starting to believe that the isolated suburban lifestyle of the 20th century isn't ideal.
 
Old 08-10-2015, 05:59 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,728,729 times
Reputation: 30796
I wasn't envious until I heard about the hugeness of the buildings. Then, when I heard about the healthiness of the food, I was sold.

Japan... Here I come!
 
Old 08-10-2015, 06:24 PM
 
3,806 posts, read 5,199,282 times
Reputation: 3294
They have a cool culture.
 
Old 08-10-2015, 06:55 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,710,950 times
Reputation: 9029
Ahhh and here come the people telling us how our life's in the suburbs are
 
Old 08-10-2015, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,366 posts, read 1,810,285 times
Reputation: 3298
Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
Ahhh and here come the people telling us how our life's in the suburbs are
I see the appeal if you want to raise a family thats about the only reason I can think of to chose suburban living.
 
Old 08-10-2015, 07:14 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,710,950 times
Reputation: 9029
Quote:
Originally Posted by BornintheSprings View Post
I see the appeal if you want to raise a family thats about the only reason I can think of to chose suburban living.
oooook
 
Old 08-10-2015, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,353,482 times
Reputation: 11309
Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
Americans are very "independent" and are not really social.
Most Americans do not know their friends' age, salary, etc., and do not turn to their friends in case they need help. Often times long-term neighbors don't know each others' telephone numbers.

Some people like that. They don't bother others, and don't want others to bother them.
I always groan and shake my head when I read stuff like this.

People seriously think that Americans live in total isolation from the people around them? If that was the case then how come American has a society and cities filled with millions of peoole rather than just a collection of tribes and family compounds?

My fiance told me, matter of factly, that American society was like this a few months ago (she is chinese), and it took a couple hours of me reminding her that I lived in the US for 30 years and all the stories of my life there that i'd told her before she finally capitulated that maybe it wasn't the case. It seems it's something that people in Asia and to a lesser extent Europe believe, as though Americans a) all live in suburbs, and b) can all be classified in a taxonomic sense.
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