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Old 08-11-2015, 03:03 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,626 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by violent by design View Post
If they did not work so much I think being Japanese would be pretty cool. I'm working in Hong Kong right now which I assume has a close work culture even if it is not as well known as Japans, and I think the hours here are pretty bad. Working on Saturdays, doing a 9-6 instead of 9-5, bad vacation days. Not my cup of tea personally.

Leisure time is important to me and it is probably one of the reasons why I will leave the United States, so I have little reason to envy Japan.

Outside of Japan, they do not really have anything that the West does not have - unless I am missing something?
that's very close-minded for you to say "Outside of Japan, they do not really have anything that the West does not have "

i can garantee you missed alot. outside of japan is just whole another colorful world of asia,every place has it's own taste.
you know japan is also a country copied/adapted alot other countries cultruals...be adventurous and you'll see.

 
Old 08-11-2015, 07:23 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,295,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
dude, what you described as the "american definition of high standard of living" applies more to 50 year old republicans than it does to gen-x or millennial aged Americans...

many millions of Americans live in urban centers where you can walk to all of this stuff, and many if not most young Americans aspire to this lifestyle and aren't concerned with large houses and yards. I know that when I lived in SF, Boston, LA, Oakland, and Seattle, I could walk to 24 hour convenience stores in less than ten minutes, and in all of them except Seattle I could walk to 24 hour supermarkets and reataurants in about the same... let's not overgeneralize?
very true, but I dare say less than 10% of the US population live a walkable life.
LA definitely has walkable neighbourhoods, but in general, it is unrealistic not to have/use a car frequently.

Boston has a compact central city, with maybe 300,000 people. Outside central area, it is as spreadout and car dependent as Atlanta. So is Seattle.
 
Old 08-11-2015, 08:42 AM
 
340 posts, read 271,586 times
Reputation: 162
On a superficial level, Japanophiles envy japan, otherwise it is akin to suggesting purple envies orange. Every country has cultural quirks and cool hobbies and anyone doesn't have every single one at once.
 
Old 08-11-2015, 05:36 PM
 
47 posts, read 40,962 times
Reputation: 41
I envy certain aspects of Japan, not all. Japan is a developed country and yes it is globally ranked number one in technology, but those are just other factors that don't necessarily contribute as much towards the attraction that the country produces.

I personally find Japan attractive because it is urbanized, and more walkable. In terms of safety, Japan does indeed have lower crime rates.

The downside is, extremely close living spaces, the costs of living within a city, the geographical disasters that are possible (seems bigger to foreigners such as I), the fact that you're going to stick out, etc.

Like another commenter posted, I would choose Japan over the United States because of the culture, rather than the technological aspect that it gives off. The U.S. would be my second option, since I do enjoy a nation made up of nations and debates between extremeties is entertaining to an independent voter, lol.
 
Old 08-11-2015, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Asia
2,761 posts, read 1,106,837 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
...I dare say less than 10% of the US population live a walkable life.
That's probably not correct.

According to the 2010 US Census ( https://ask.census.gov/faq.php?id=5000&faqId=5971 ), the urban areas of the United States contain 249,253,271 people, representing 80.7% of the population, and rural areas contain 59,492,276 people, or 19.3% of the population.
 
Old 08-11-2015, 07:03 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,221,981 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Salmonburgher View Post
That's probably not correct.

According to the 2010 US Census ( https://ask.census.gov/faq.php?id=5000&faqId=5971 ), the urban areas of the United States contain 249,253,271 people, representing 80.7% of the population, and rural areas contain 59,492,276 people, or 19.3% of the population.
Majority of urban (this seems like a pretty loose definition) residents still need a car. I have a feeling the Census's definition of urban also includes the close suburbs of urban areas, which are not walkable at all for the most part
 
Old 08-11-2015, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Asia
2,761 posts, read 1,106,837 times
Reputation: 2989
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Majority of urban (this seems like a pretty loose definition) residents still need a car. I have a feeling the Census's definition of urban also includes the close suburbs of urban areas, which are not walkable at all for the most part
I was responding to the 10% figure. I believe that is far too low.

Moreover, even in areas where Americans ride rather than walk, they could (and probably should) walk more often. Often driving rather than walking is a decision and not a necessity.
 
Old 08-11-2015, 07:30 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,221,981 times
Reputation: 11628
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salmonburgher View Post
I was responding to the 10% figure. I believe that is far too low.

Moreover, even in areas where Americans ride rather than walk, they could (and probably should) walk more often. Often driving rather than walking is a decision and not a necessity.
When your bus only goes by your closest stop once every hour, it makes it inconvenient. It also makes it inconvenient walking 1/2 mile each way with grocery bags in both your hands. Also, very often people don't have jobs close to where they live, and the bus schedules are not convenient to start and end times, you arrive at work too early or go home too late. This is the problem I have in my city, and I live in a smaller one on a bus route that's not very well served to my needs
 
Old 08-11-2015, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Asia
2,761 posts, read 1,106,837 times
Reputation: 2989
That's fine.

All I'm saying is that the 10% figure is likely too low and thus incorrect.
 
Old 08-12-2015, 01:59 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,800 posts, read 17,750,871 times
Reputation: 9029
Quote:
Originally Posted by Salmonburgher View Post
I was responding to the 10% figure. I believe that is far too low.

Moreover, even in areas where Americans ride rather than walk, they could (and probably should) walk more often. Often driving rather than walking is a decision and not a necessity.
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