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Old 09-04-2015, 05:19 PM
 
722 posts, read 926,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
Generally speaking, Chinese people do not eat raw eggs. They have to be well cooked.
the steaming hot rice actually cooks the egg if you wait a few minutes, lots of Chinese like a rare egg or not fully cooked.

over cooking ruins the flavor.
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Old 09-04-2015, 06:46 PM
 
6,647 posts, read 4,144,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green papaya View Post
a common quick meal a farmer might have is a hot bowl of rice with a couple of raw eggs over the top with a little oyster sauce

it's like a rare egg over rice
One of the Japanese families I stayed with had this for breakfast. Just hot rice and raw egg, nothing else.
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Old 09-04-2015, 08:14 PM
 
1,424 posts, read 738,932 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green papaya View Post
the steaming hot rice actually cooks the egg if you wait a few minutes, lots of Chinese like a rare egg or not fully cooked.

over cooking ruins the flavor.
That is a popular Korean dish (拌饭), not really so common in China.
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Old 09-05-2015, 08:58 AM
 
9,981 posts, read 8,227,206 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
One of the Japanese families I stayed with had this for breakfast. Just hot rice and raw egg, nothing else.
That's similar to an old Cajun breakfast meal. We usually have leftover rice from the night before. I heat the skillet on low/medium (about 1/4th heat), drop two eggs in the skillet, when the white starts to harden I flip them and turn off the heat. The remaining heat from the skillet continues to harden the white. After reheating the leftover rice, I place the eggs on the rice, add some traditional Cajun seasoning, and stir. One day while in the US Navy, a Navy cook from Louisiana put leftover rice on the breakfast line. Those of us from Louisiana wanted the rice and fried eggs on top of the rice. Everyone else were looking at us as if we were crazy. Then came the sailors of southeast Asia origin and Pacific Island origins. They also wanted the rice and eggs. We all sat at the same area passing around a bottle of Tabasco to season the dish. Other sailors made a disgusted face when they saw us eat the eggs and rice.
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:12 PM
 
919 posts, read 605,841 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green papaya View Post
a common quick meal a farmer might have is a hot bowl of rice with a couple of raw eggs over the top with a little oyster sauce

it's like a rare egg over rice
In Japan, we usually prefer soy sauce to oyster sauce for that matter. You can even buy a kind of soy sauce exclusively prepared for that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
Generally speaking, Chinese people do not eat raw eggs.
True. And don't do that in China or USA. Salmonella might make you sick.

Here in Japan, eggshells are polished and filed, and Salmonella sticked on eggshells are gone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
One of the Japanese families I stayed with had this for breakfast. Just hot rice and raw egg, nothing else.
I am pretty sure she/he used soy sauce as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
That is a popular Korean dish (拌饭), not really so common in China.
I guess you have never seen what OP is introducing.

비빔밥 is normally served with 돌솥 - a pot made of stone, which is heated extremely hot and cooks raw eggs well. That's why you call it 石(stone)锅(pot)拌饭 in Chinese.

You can check this video: https://youtu.be/ee23Qz3RTpY
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:18 PM
 
919 posts, read 605,841 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
That's similar to an old Cajun breakfast meal. We usually have leftover rice from the night before. I heat the skillet on low/medium (about 1/4th heat), drop two eggs in the skillet, when the white starts to harden I flip them and turn off the heat. The remaining heat from the skillet continues to harden the white. After reheating the leftover rice, I place the eggs on the rice, add some traditional Cajun seasoning, and stir. One day while in the US Navy, a Navy cook from Louisiana put leftover rice on the breakfast line. Those of us from Louisiana wanted the rice and fried eggs on top of the rice. Everyone else were looking at us as if we were crazy. Then came the sailors of southeast Asia origin and Pacific Island origins. They also wanted the rice and eggs. We all sat at the same area passing around a bottle of Tabasco to season the dish.
I would try that definitely

Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
Other sailors made a disgusted face when they saw us eat the eggs and rice.
This reminds me a lady who made a disgusted face when she saw me eating seaweed in Vegas
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Old 09-06-2015, 10:48 PM
 
1,424 posts, read 738,932 times
Reputation: 508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post

I guess you have never seen what OP is introducing.

비빔밥 is normally served with 돌솥 - a pot made of stone, which is heated extremely hot and cooks raw eggs well. That's why you call it 石(stone)锅(pot)拌饭 in Chinese.

You can check this video: https://youtu.be/ee23Qz3RTpY
I ate 石锅拌饭 many times in America and in China.
I just pointed out that raw egg on hot rice is not a common dish in China, which is perfectly true. Also very few Chinese eat raw eggs in anyway.
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Old 09-09-2015, 10:09 PM
 
919 posts, read 605,841 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
I ate 石锅拌饭 many times in America and in China.
I just pointed out that raw egg on hot rice is not a common dish in China, which is perfectly true. Also very few Chinese eat raw eggs in anyway.
I have eaten raw eggs in China, but only in Yoshinoya-type restaurants

Have you checked the video? Japanese eat raw eggs very often.
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Old 09-11-2015, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Mount Laurel
4,165 posts, read 9,147,503 times
Reputation: 3465
Plain rice is the staple of a meal for Chinese. Any additional meat or vegetables dishes on the side are compliments to complete what's served. In my family growing up, 3 compliments and soup with rice is a good meal. The wealthier you are, the more/better meats dishes as compliments.

Over the years, that had changed. People don't eat as much rice now in this age (for numerous reasons). I ate lots of rice in my younger age. About 15 years ago when I went to China to visit my in law I was shocked that they didn't eat like the way I was growing up. They didn't cook enough rice for me for the first 2-3 meal cause the family was used to having a bowl of rice per person but I was eating 5-6 bowls.

One also need to understand that the way Chinese cook plain rice a lot different than the typical American.
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Old 09-11-2015, 09:14 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,300,838 times
Reputation: 7587
Quote:
Originally Posted by sj08054 View Post
Plain rice is the staple of a meal for Chinese. Any additional meat or vegetables dishes on the side are compliments to complete what's served. In my family growing up, 3 compliments and soup with rice is a good meal. The wealthier you are, the more/better meats dishes as compliments.

Over the years, that had changed. People don't eat as much rice now in this age (for numerous reasons). I ate lots of rice in my younger age. About 15 years ago when I went to China to visit my in law I was shocked that they didn't eat like the way I was growing up. They didn't cook enough rice for me for the first 2-3 meal cause the family was used to having a bowl of rice per person but I was eating 5-6 bowls.

One also need to understand that the way Chinese cook plain rice a lot different than the typical American.
People ate a lot of rice because they didn't have enough meat and other food at that time, and rice is relatively cheap. Now things changed and they only eat the rice for just enough carbohydrate.

Most Chinese families cook rice using a electric rice cooker. Some American families do too, but many just boil rice on the stone until it is cooked.
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