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Old 09-13-2015, 11:07 AM
 
6,725 posts, read 6,601,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
You think their chances are any better in Europe or Latin America?


You really believe that? The common thing here in China is that in childhood and into the early to mid teens, sure: have your hobbies!! Play guitar. Sing. Dance. Play basketball. Do art. Mom and dad will even pay for the lessons, provided that they are urban middle- or upper-class.

As soon as you hit high school and it's time to start worrying about gaokao and college, though: goodbye dilettante aspirations, electives, and majors...

Even just telling a kid that they can be "anything they want" is a pretty damn Western thing, something that is notoriously uncommon here... and that's something that does weigh heavily on millions of young Asians. The very same cultural pragmatism that so many Asians are proud of and attribute to the success of places like Japan, Korea, HK, Taiwan, and now China, are the source of angst and ennui for many young people who realize that their desired lifepath would be totally unacceptable to their families.

It's also not like a white American kid can just decide to become an actor and get cast in a movie, or a black American kid can decide he wants to be a rapper and have a successful song in the charts, all the same that it's not like a Chinese kid who wants to be a dancer or singer can just go and make a living off it.
It is true that Asians face severe discrimination (by audience, not just producers ) in America, if they want to be actors, dancers and so on. Many of them have to give up even if they have good potential.

Being a performer etc. is often an unstable career path. Parents all over the world will have some worries, IF THEY REALLY CARE ABOUT THEIR CHILDREN. That being said, China has all sorts of performers, from singers, dancers to acrobats. In fact they are over supplied already. Some performers are government employees, including Peng Liyuan the first lady.

Last edited by Bettafish; 09-13-2015 at 11:35 AM..
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Old 09-13-2015, 11:15 AM
 
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In China, the gaokao is very difficult. One cannot be successful unless he works very hard.
That is truly a bloody reality. However, those who want to attend a conservatory of music, or an academy of fine arts do not need high scores in gaokao. Usually they attend special high schools to develop their techniques.
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Old 09-13-2015, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,351,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
It is true that Asians face severe discrimination (by audience, not just producers ) in America, if they want to be actors, dancers and so on. Many of them have to give up even if they have good potential.
But, so do most non-Asian people who have similar aspirations and potential. It's just not a business in which most people can make it, plain and simple.

If you want to go by numbers, with Asians making up 5% of the US populace, does it really make sense for there to be tons of Asian leading men and women in film and TV? Asians are used in all sorts of domestic, US-market advertising, they appear in dance productions (which aren't overwhelmingly popular in the US anyways), there are a good number present in stage acting and theatre... in domestic Asian markets, how often are roles given to non-Asian people in films, shows, music, etc? You may see some token white faces here or there added to give the impression that whatever product is popular in the West, or as a foreign-born foil in a movie, or a extras in a TV episode that's supposed to be in France or something. Sound familiar?

Saying that it's easier for an Asian kid to be a celebrity in Asia than America is like saying that it's easier to be a cardio surgeon than a neurosurgeon.

Quote:
Being a performer etc. is often an unstable career path. Parents all over the world will have some worries, IF THEY REALLY CARE ABOUT THEIR CHILDREN. That being said, China has all sorts of performers, from singers, dancers to acrobats. In fact they are over supplied already. Some performers are government employees, including Peng Liyuan the first lady.

...

In China, the gaokao is very difficult. One cannot be successful unless he works very hard.
That is truly a bloody reality. However, those who want to attend a conservatory of music, or an academy of fine arts do not need high scores in gaokao. Usually they attend special high schools to develop their techniques.
And it's the same in the US; there are thousands and thousands of talented artists, singers, musicians, actors, etc who perform smaller-scale, local events and either make a living, or at least, a supplementary income doing so... of course people all over Asia do the same thing.

As far as education goes: in the US, it's not overwhelmingly difficult to get into art school or a college or university if one even passively applies themselves. You can take the SAT's as many times as you want, and even if you bomb out or never took them, a few semesters at a community college with good grades, and you can transfer to a prestigious institution. Sure, you'll graduate later, but isn't that the new American norm? In China, it isn't anywhere near as easy. Messing up on the Gaokao will follow you for some time to come. The pressure is immense, and again, it's expected that artsy-fartsy stuff like acting, dancing, etc will take a backseat to more "serious" academic pursuits. Parents in the US, and more broadly, the West, generally take the attitude that going to school to study one of these topics is acceptable because they can easily transfer over to a more directly-applied major later.

All this aside, many young people in China are feeling hopeless for the same reasons that their American and European contemporaries are: poor or inadequate job prospects, rising real estate to income ratios that place home ownership - which is traditionally a foundation requirement for (a good) marriage - out of their grasp, a bleak male-to-female ratio in the coming years, and an unsure economy. The only thing that is non-analogous in some way to the West is the looming deficit of women. I do feel quite sorry for the millions of young men, currently and in the future, for whom this will be an inescapable mark on their whole life.

Last edited by 415_s2k; 09-13-2015 at 01:28 PM..
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Old 09-14-2015, 12:58 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,255,922 times
Reputation: 7578
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post

Even just telling a kid that they can be "anything they want" is a pretty damn Western thing, something that is notoriously uncommon here... and that's something that does weigh heavily on millions of young Asians. The very same cultural pragmatism that so many Asians are proud of and attribute to the success of places like Japan, Korea, HK, Taiwan, and now China, are the source of angst and ennui for many young people who realize that their desired lifepath would be totally unacceptable to their families.

It's also not like a white American kid can just decide to become an actor and get cast in a movie, or a black American kid can decide he wants to be a rapper and have a successful song in the charts, all the same that it's not like a Chinese kid who wants to be a dancer or singer can just go and make a living off it.
true, but it is their own fault to think what they do needs approval from their parents. Many Asian kids can't married someone without approval of the parents of both sides, which is so stupid.

Be an adult first and then expect others to treat you like one. How many of the Asian kids after turning 23 and having their first job and still live under their parents' roof, especially in large cities. I hate the "rent is expensive excuse". If you live under your mother's roof, expect the mother to interfere with your life. Independence has to come from financial independence.
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