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Old 09-12-2015, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
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TOKYO — Ariana Miyamoto was born and raised in Japan and speaks fluent Japanese. But she said most people in her homeland see her as a foreigner.

“My appearance isn’t Asian,” she said, “[but] I think I’m very much Japanese on the inside.”

Being 'Hafu' in Japan | Al Jazeera America
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Old 09-12-2015, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
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I've known a few half-Japanese people who were born or raised in Japan. Most of them feel that way - very "Japanese" on the inside, since that's where they grew up, and they're generally more familiar with that culture... but, also somewhat separate from the culture since they're immediately identified as being something different, which in a homogeneous society can be really, really difficult.

Most half-Chinese people I know are in a similar situation, and often end up identifying more with their Western part as they grow up because their home culture doesn't accept them as "one of them," but the West is generally fairly accepting of mixed marriages and mixed people. Fortunately, the discrimination they face generally isn't violent or anything, but even the more positive stereotypes can be insulting and patronizing, and they tend to get worse in the teens as the nationalism tied to ethnicity becomes more pronounced.
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Old 09-12-2015, 10:36 AM
 
6,493 posts, read 4,076,481 times
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My nephew (caucasian, blonde, blue-eyed) moved to Japan, married a Japanese woman, and has two sons. They are still very young, but I've already heard that they have been singled out for teasing and ostracism on the playground and at preschool.

Unfortunately my nephew is now divorced, and the ex (understandably) won't allow him to take the children to the US even on a visit. It's sad, because here in California no one would bat an eye at their appearance, there are so many mixed-race people, but in Japan they will always be "different." Maybe they can come when they're older.
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Old 09-12-2015, 11:30 AM
 
722 posts, read 921,775 times
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it's always been like that, mixed race asians are never accepted as asian, they are usually considered the race of the father

especially mixed race children from US servicemen, those are usually looked down on and never accepted. Almost like the children of prostitutes
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Old 09-12-2015, 11:31 AM
 
542 posts, read 489,675 times
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About a decade ago my now ex-wife (teacher) left her lesson plans at home so I was asked to drop them off to her classroom.

I agreed and proceeded to her classroom. Upon passing through the playground I heard two young African American kids (probably 5 or so) arguing. They were degrading each other and kept saying, "Your Mom's a Haitian". "No, your Mom is..." It went on and on as I continued on my way.

Here in South Florida we have a number of Haitian Americans (who are Black) and a significant group of African Americans. We also have a good mixture of Latin's of all types and a number of others. I guess you could say that we are pretty fortunate to be a very multi-cultural society.

For years, this little argument has bothered me and still does so today. I suppose that in essence we all favor ourselves and people like us. I think it's primarily a pride thing that is only overcome by exposure, experience and education.

Often I tell my mixed children (White/Asian) that "out of the many things in life that you enjoy chances are they were made, invented, perfected or produced by someone that's not like you. No sense in carrying prejudices around as they get heavy after a while".

Cheers
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Old 09-12-2015, 02:01 PM
JL
 
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The older Japanese might have issue, but the younger Japanese don't really care...open minded.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5s-8HEq7NW0
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Old 09-12-2015, 03:15 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,169,326 times
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This isn't unique to Japan. I'm mixed race as well, I've had problems when I started elementary school in rural Pennsylvania after I moved here from Puerto Rico. There were some Puerto Ricans born and raised in NY that began to move over too, and I was never accepted in either group. I was too mixed for the whites, too white for the other minorities. I know exactly how these half-Japanese kids feel, I went through the same exact thing. I look barely white in passing, but apparently some people know I'm mixed, while others don't. The other unfortunate thing is, most of these half Japanese kids have full Caucasian fathers, recipients whether they wanted or not of white male privilege back home. I think many of these kids are not fully equipped to deal with problems in a world that is still, and will be long after we're all dead, tribal when it comes to race. I was lucky to have parents that have dealt with that and give me advice especially in my teenage years.

It's not gonna get any better for children who have a Western parent in Japan. The vast majority of "mixed-race" babies in Japan are half Japanese and........half Chinese or Korean.
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Old 09-12-2015, 04:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by green papaya View Post
it's always been like that, mixed race asians are never accepted as asian, they are usually considered the race of the father

especially mixed race children from US servicemen, those are usually looked down on and never accepted. Almost like the children of prostitutes
what if the father's race is asian?
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Old 09-12-2015, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Taipei
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Typical Asia tbh.
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Old 09-12-2015, 07:02 PM
 
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not in the Philippines.

you enjoy special status when you're "tisoy/tisay" (from the Spanish mestizo). You're considered attractive and most end up having careers in showbiz or modelling.

Filipino kids born to white fathers almost always look white so they definitely stand out but everybody likes them cos they're cute or gwapo
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